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Old 12-29-2017, 06:13 AM
 
Location: Washington State
18,529 posts, read 9,580,194 times
Reputation: 15782

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newarkbomb View Post
Have you ever thought a city was so bad, even know you have never been there, but end up going being surprised that it was actually a fine city.
Or
Have you ever thought a city was great but when you visited it was terrible.

If so, what cities?

I felt that way about Albany, NY. I thought it would be boonieville and it would be boring and nothing worth seeing, but when i was actually there I loved it.

(sorry, wrong forum to put this in... I thought i was in the General US forum)
From Washington state, I had a negative perception of South Carolina and when my company sent me to Greenville, I went with a negative pre-conceived opinion. However, I loved it there, the people very friendly, climate was good, a beautiful area, nice restaurants and very cool downtown.

When I was sent for a project in Shanghai, China, I also had a negative opinion but also really enjoyed it there as well.

Place that weren't as nice as I was expecting were Moscow, Russia and Italy...didn't like them.
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Old 12-29-2017, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,231 posts, read 2,510,875 times
Reputation: 5703
I thought Milwaukee was a dangerous, dying rust belt city. Not a town to give a second thought. Then when my husband had a job opportunity here I actually took the time to objectively research it. I was intrigued enough to visit. Needless to say, we've now been living in MKE for about seven weeks and I love it!


I had to take a work trip to Houston once so I was going to take the opportunity to visit my sister in San Antonio. Everyone told me I would love San Antonio and hate Houston. It was the exact opposite. I despised San Antonio. I don't understand the hype. Part of that may be from the numerous rude encounters I had at every turn. While I didn't necessarily love Houston, I didn't have any problem with it either.

Last edited by Vegabern; 12-29-2017 at 07:41 AM..
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Old 12-29-2017, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Clifton, Cincinnati
124 posts, read 62,340 times
Reputation: 161
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
Buffalo: I initially thought Buffalo would have a thriving Downtown surrounded by decaying blighted neighborhoods in all directions. Instead when I visited (on a weekend mind you) I found that Downtown, while clean, was downright desolate with not much to do (the SPOT Coffee location Downtown was hoppin' and awesome, though!) I then walked for miles all around adjacent Allentown and Elmwood Village and fell in love with those neighborhoods. Both of those neighborhoods could give the best urban neighborhoods of Pittsburgh a run for their money. The tree-lined streets and vernacular residential architecture made my tail wag, too!

Cincinnati: I never knew a lot about Cincinnati, so prior to visiting I had mediocre expectations for it. Instead I found out that I really enjoyed the city. Downtown, Over-the-Rhine, and Mt. Adams are three awesome neighborhoods. I love how dense, urban, and walkable, the Northern Kentucky suburbs just across the Ohio River from Downtown Cincinnati are. Cincinnati reminds me a lot of Pittsburgh with its greenery, older architecture, and hills---it's just more socially conservative and a LOT cheaper now that Pittsburgh is trying to become the next Seattle. Who can argue against Jungle Jim's or Skyline Chili, too? The zoo is great. So are the museums. Mass transit? Meh.

Cleveland: A lot of Ohio people hate Pennsylvania (size envy, I guess). A lot of Pennsylvania people hate Ohio ("flyover country" snobbery, I guess). As such, I first went to Cleveland expect it to be some sort of bombed-out war zone---the "Mistake on the Lake" if you will. Instead I found that while about half the city (far east and far south of Downtown) was just as described the Downtown was amazingly vibrant. I loved Playhouse Square with the giant chandelier suspended over the roadway and all of the Times Square-like TV screens around. In addition, Heinen's has to be the NICEST urban grocery store I've ever been in. The streets were a little wide for my tastes as a pedestrian, but then again I've never experienced the heavy traffic issues in Cleveland I experience in Pittsburgh, and Pittsburgh is a smaller city. Ohio City was awesome. I feel Cleveland boosters on here overhype Detroit-Shoreway and Tremont, though. I found myself bored in both neighborhoods in well under an hour. Little Italy, while compact, is much more "authentic" than Pittsburgh's Bloomfield, which is our Little Italy. University Circle, which is Cleveland's "eds and meds" neighborhood, reminds me a lot of Pittsburgh's Oakland. While Pittsburgh's Oakland is very crowded, concrete-y, and dirty, University Circle has much more greenery intertwined with the urban fabric, feels cleaner, and feels less claustrophobic.

Erie: Erie only slightly surpassed my expectations. A lot of Erie natives now live in/around Pittsburgh, and I've befriended many. They all speak fondly (albeit not "highly") of Erie, so I went there expecting an average city. I found the city to punch above-average. For a city of 100,000 it has a lot of amenities found in much larger cities. Presque Isle State Park literally blew me away with its breathtaking beauty. The city, especially from Downtown on west through the Frontier Park area, is lovely. The east side could use some work---just like Cleveland and Buffalo.
I practically grew up in the Pittsburgh area. I always get a kick on this forum when Pittsburgh (by its own posters) or Pennsylvania for that matter isn't viewed in the same light as Ohio. Ohio and Pennsylvania are more of a rival than Ohio is with Wisconsin or Missouri. Being labeled in a certain region doesn't mean much in the way of culture; location and distance do. Basic geography tells you Ohio is more in line with Michigan or Pennsylvania. Sorry, but anything west of I87 or New Jersey if you want to go that far is basically fly over country. There's more hate for Ohio on this forum from Pennsylvania (Pittsburgh posters, again) than the other way around. Interesting.
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Old 12-29-2017, 09:04 AM
 
Location: North of Birmingham, AL
325 posts, read 250,480 times
Reputation: 461
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
I had to take a work trip to Houston once so I was going to take the opportunity to visit my sister in San Antonio. Everyone told me I would love San Antonio and hate Houston. It was the exact opposite. I despised San Antonio. I don't understand the hype. Part of that may be from the numerous rude encounters I had at every turn. While I didn't necessarily love Houston, I didn't have any problem with it either.
My wife and I went to San Antonio around Christmas last year. I was expecting to like it a lot more than I did. The Riverwalk area is nice, but got old pretty quickly. I think it would be a fun convention city, though, and if we had more time we probably would've rented a car and headed out to the Hill Country.

On a plus side, Indianapolis impressed me more than I expected when I was there in May 2007 to run the Indy Mini Marathon. I'm sure it's even better now.
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Old 12-29-2017, 09:15 AM
 
1,273 posts, read 750,037 times
Reputation: 1596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newarkbomb View Post
I felt that way about Albany, NY. I thought it would be boonieville and it would be boring and nothing worth seeing, but when i was actually there I loved it.
Glad you were pleased with Albany. The Capital Region as a whole has a lot to offer. You should visit Saratoga and Lake George during the summer time. Lark Fest in Albany is a good time to many, although it's not really my scene. Troy now offers some really hip urban living spaces and the community is very walkable.
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Old 12-29-2017, 09:36 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,738 posts, read 9,030,452 times
Reputation: 11122
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I was surprised by Detroit when I first went there about 16 years ago. I thought it would be a bit more built up, but unfortunately it wasn't.

Boston took me by surprise as far as so much to do and the people were pretty friendly.
I was also pleasantly surprised by Detroit.
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Old 12-29-2017, 11:12 AM
 
3,961 posts, read 3,493,210 times
Reputation: 6362
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
I thought Milwaukee was a dangerous, dying rust belt city. Not a town to give a second thought. Then when my husband had a job opportunity here I actually took the time to objectively research it. I was intrigued enough to visit. Needless to say, we've now been living in MKE for about seven weeks and I love it!
.
IMHO Milwaukee is the most unsung city on this website.
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Old 12-29-2017, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,386,291 times
Reputation: 7710
I really didn't care for LA, more so because the attitude given from Californians (the pretentious snooty ones who think anything beyond California and NYC is a wasteland) but I visited this fall and enjoyed it. The train is pretty cheap and easy to get around. I was surprised at how brown it is, though. I know its a dry climate but I expected a little more "green."

I enjoyed my time in the city but could never live there. My ex was actually a little disappointed but he came in with higher expectations than I did. It is true that California is overhyped. I don't buy into the California hype so I was able to enjoy my time more, if that even makes sense.
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Old 12-29-2017, 10:36 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,584,119 times
Reputation: 6091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I'd say Los Angeles. The glamorous image that Hollywood presents is definitely not true for most of greater LA. Large portions of Los Angeles resembled a Third World city and there was a lot of grittiness throughout. Even Hollywood itself wasn't as nice as I had expected and Venice Beach felt very trashy and full of weird people. A lot of the Inland Empire was also kind of depressing and not as nice as other Southwest cities like Las Vegas or Phoenix.

I did like Orange County and San Diego though.

I expected Miami to be a Third World city similar to a typical Latin American city but it was more well kept than I expected though there certainly ARE a lot of very run down parts of town. But physically it still looked more like an American city while culturally its not really an American city.
I think your idea of "third world" is a bit skewed.
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Old 12-30-2017, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Chicago
5,890 posts, read 6,535,124 times
Reputation: 5356
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
IMHO Milwaukee is the most unsung city on this website.
So, you have these two cities, a mere 90 miles apart, on the southwestern shore of Lake Michigan. One is a huge, global city, the other one a relatively small major city.

What would you expect those in the big city to think about their far smaller neighbors?

well, if the big city is Chicago and the smaller one is Milwaukee, Chicagoans tend to see Milwaukee in very positive terms, and it is anything but unsung in Chicagoland.

We're more than happy to have Milwaukee as our northern neighbors, greatly appreciate its charms (they're man) and beauty (nobody does lakefront as Chicago and Milwaukee), and readily access the city for pleasure.

A trip from Chicago to Milwaukee is a day trip. And if you see the cars entering the city from the south on I-94, you will note that a good percentage of them (if not majority) have IL plates.

I simply never hear Chicagoans put down Milwaukee. Then again, consider what my city should have been named (and almost was....before the state line was moved northward to give IL Lake Michigan frontage):

Chicago, WI

In many ways, Wisconsin is our home state, we go to it far more than we go to downstate Illinois and we know it well. So Milwaukee easily joins a slew of places.....Lake Geneva, Madison, The Dells, Door County, Eagle River, Spring Green, etc.....that just feels like home to us.
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