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Old 04-01-2007, 03:29 PM
 
23 posts, read 60,123 times
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Very Interesting post and that you've thought of it this way. You're definitely a Big Picture Thinker! I see what you mean about things seeming to be in transition and fairly rapidly too. IMHO Boston, Miami, New York, Los Angeles will remain top cities. I read recently a study that said that soon one in twenty persons living in Boston proper will be millionaires - they have a strong intellectual base, medical industry, and biotech on the rise. Boston itself is undergoing a stunning overhaul that will create a city worthy of attracting an even much greater tourist number than it enjoys currently. For whatever reason many people who live in New York love it and will never leave. it has so much going on it would take several decades before it could decline from the top ten list. We would have to see a long term mega recession before that happened (keep fingers crossed that that never occurs). Los Angeles is propped up by the entertainment industry, good weather and despite its drawbacks will continue to thrive because enough people with enough money call it home. Miami is growing yearly and in some industries is becoming a real player.
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Old 04-01-2007, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Wi for the summer--Vegas in the winter
653 posts, read 3,132,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
I definitely agree that LV is riding the big wave right now, but like I said, if the economy crashes and people just dont have the extra income to gamble or take pleasure trips, LV is going down. Mark my words. W/o the gaming industry, LV is no better than, say, Santa Fe, NM... hardly a power player.
Thing is, when Americans no longer have the money to come to Vegas, there will be plently of wealthy people comming from Japan, China, Thailand, India and other countries where personal wealth is increasing. And it doesn't neccesarily take a lot of money to come to Vegas and have a good time. One can come for a week, stay in a nice place, eat well, do some gambling--do it EASILY on 300-500 dollars if planned right. NO--I have to disagree with you. I believe Las Vegas has a continued bright future. It''ll have some ups and downs, but the city is destined for continued growth and prosperity.
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Old 04-02-2007, 05:49 AM
 
53 posts, read 285,227 times
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Also going in Vegas' favor is a unioninzed workforce, at least in the casinos. Compared to other service-economy cities with tons of 8$ an hour jobs, these Vegas wages should create a stronger, more diversified economy in the long run.
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Old 04-02-2007, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Denver
20 posts, read 85,131 times
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Denver is definitely going to be one of America's greatest cities in time, right now the economy is great, and I think it will get better soon. Its' great and rising economy, superior systems for transit, pollution, and population growth, and the great people that work hard for Denver will all pay off soon. I'm seeing it happen now, Denver is growing tremendously, and the city is doing well manging it all.
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Old 04-02-2007, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Wi for the summer--Vegas in the winter
653 posts, read 3,132,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ozradio View Post
Also going in Vegas' favor is a unioninzed workforce, at least in the casinos. Compared to other service-economy cities with tons of 8$ an hour jobs, these Vegas wages should create a stronger, more diversified economy in the long run.
Good Point!! I agree!!
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Old 04-02-2007, 06:49 PM
 
450 posts, read 1,838,692 times
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Default Good research: Water is a key as well as climate.

Just want to add that the availability of water is as big a factor as climate. Las Vegas has Lake Meade to draw on. But the Colorado will have to be supplemented by tapping into the Pacific Northwest and the cost and environmental considerations might make for less growth in the Southwest.

Some may have to put up with the humidity in the South to have access to water for urban growth. Along the Gulf Coast most development will occur North of the I-10 corridor--further inland with better elevation makes hurricane insurance cheaper.

Only the rich will live right on the water--coast. Others will have to settle for more inland areas. Homes will be built up to code to make Hurricanes more endurable, but they will still be a factor. Consider that older baby boomers are less resilient and want a safer environment.

Piedmont and mountains of the Carolinas a major draw. Hill country of Texas and Austin also big. But you have to have water and lots of it. Water is the white gold of the West. Environmental factors may limit growth in the Pacific Northwest. People in Washington State and Oregon do not exactly welcome newcomers with open arms. Panhandle of Alaska warmed by the Japanese Current is another possibility. But alot of that land is tied up by the Federal government.
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Old 04-05-2007, 07:22 AM
 
10 posts, read 39,545 times
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Default Some perspective from Detroit

http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll...ETRO/704050374

People are flocking south like never before...it wont stop. Sad thing is my home (Detroit) wont EVER recover.
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Old 04-05-2007, 09:51 AM
 
244 posts, read 1,018,561 times
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Excellent list. I agree with it. However, I see a definite development of far west states like Las Vegas, NV and Phoenix, and Denver. Additionally, I see Atlanta becoming a major player.

As for the other cities you mentioned, I do not see them becoming "major players", more like "side-line" players.
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Old 04-06-2007, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Metro Milwaukee, WI
3,198 posts, read 11,331,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
We'll see what happens to Vegas when the economy takes a downturn and pleasure/gambling trips are out of the question for many. Vegas is a gambling town, a tourist town. Take that away and its just another crappy southwest dustbowl.
Some people enjoy the relatively constant sunshine, dry air [eg: no humidity, few mosquitos], warm air [eg: mild and short winters and actual springs], mountains, lack of snow/freezing weather, sunrises/sunsets of the southwest though, or as you describe it a "another crappy southwest dustbowl".

Chicago or other midwestern cities are great cities for many. That's great. It also is April 6, and Chicago will barely get out of the 30s today, and this cold has been in place for quite awhile including snow showers. The same is in-line for the foreseeable immediate future.

Some people just enjoy the desert and the escape from areas that have thick, gray clouds so often in the winter, summers with high humidity and mosquitos, springs that don't truly start (eg: not just a few nice days here and there) until late April at best, etc.

If you happen to love the Midwest or Chicago, great. But there is quite a bit more to Vegas or other Southwestern cities than as you've described.
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Old 04-06-2007, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Metro Milwaukee, WI
3,198 posts, read 11,331,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr2007 View Post
Honorable Mention For The "NEXT" 10 Cities: Louisville KY, Albuquerque, Memphis, Kansas City, San Antonio, El Paso, San Jose, Tampa / St. Pete
I think your honorable mention list - while surely can be debated by others - is pretty darn good and solid. I am very familiar with Albuquerque and El Paso, and am glad to see you rememberd them for your list. They often still get overlooked as it relates to their bigger southwestern brothers (although that is changing especially for Albuquerque) they will both grow rapidly as they become more and more "exposed" and known for their superior summers to some of their bigger-city southwestern counterparts.

I think you did a great job compiling this and I think in most respects, you are close to being right on!
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