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Old 04-08-2009, 11:52 AM
 
784 posts, read 2,049,757 times
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If you can stand the cool weather a bit, I would suggest Chicago. It will have tons of nightlife, good food, great downtown. It would be a good second pick from NY, since NY is so expensive.

If those three months of cold would bother you that much, you might want to try somewher in Florida. The cost of living in Florida is similar to what your already used to. The problem with Florida is you will not find a city with the kind of infrastructure your looking for, with the exception of Miami, and even so Miami can be expensive.

You might want to try something like Charlotte, Atlanta, or Norfolk. Norfolk is not that big, but you have Virginia beach twelve miles away. You also have many mid size cities like Newport News, Tidewater, etc..

If you are looking to get a bit further from the south, you will have to deal with some cold weather. But to what you originally said about NY, that you could deal with the weather for NY. You might want to really consider Chicago. As far as nightlife, things to do, large downtown, you would not be dissapointed. Chicago has great food as well.

I would also reccommend cities like Portland and Seatle, however, Seattles pretty expensive, similar to NY and I know that Portland has become more expensive as well.

I did the same thing as you when I was younger, heck even when I was older. I am a traveler too...It's good to see other parts of the world.

Good look with your decision..

Rick
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Old 04-08-2009, 12:23 PM
 
5,721 posts, read 9,085,203 times
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Another very important factor to keep in mind is how a potential employer will view your resume or application. In this job market, even if you apply for a job at Subway, there is likely to be dozens of applicants many of which will have a lot of work experience either directly in that field or one that has skills that are transferrable to another. Your lack of experience will likely prevent you from being considered for a job that otherwise you could get in a stronger job market.

Applying this logic to the situation, you should seek out a region that has the strongest job market possible while still having housing that is in your price range. Your lack of job experience will be less of an issue in an area that has a stronger economy because there will be less qualified applicants and simply less applicants going after the same jobs as you.
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Old 04-08-2009, 12:28 PM
 
18 posts, read 31,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunshineann View Post
growing up on the east coast and visiting all the states you mentioned...NJ and can be just as expensive...
Maybe the first thing you should do is research. Check out the sites on here, the pictures the people and ask questions in each states forum. they are very helpful. They helped me get to where i am at today.
I'm doing those things! lol. It's just a really big let down when you realize you can't afford the place(s) you REALLY want to move to, lol. It's just kind of hard to know who's opinions to trust because a lot of people on here appear to be very pessimistic. Just when I think I've found a city I read a whole bunch of negative comments about it (no jobs, high taxes, expensive housing, high crime rates, no scenery, etc. etc.). BTW, where do you live?
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Old 04-08-2009, 12:46 PM
 
18 posts, read 31,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Another very important factor to keep in mind is how a potential employer will view your resume or application.
There aren't very many jobs where I live either. Like I said, I live in a small city (or retired community) surrounded by other small cites. Austin is about an hour drive from me, but I have no interest in moving there or anywhere in the state of TX. I like TX, but I just want to experience different states. I'm getting off topic, so anyway, the point I'm trying to make is that there aren't many jobs in my area either. So, would I really be doing myself a disservice by moving away from a city that does NOT have many jobs? I could very well lose my job here and have a hard time finding more work sense I don't have very many options.
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Old 04-08-2009, 12:59 PM
 
18 posts, read 31,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SlickRick1 View Post
If you can stand the cool weather a bit, I would suggest Chicago. It will have tons of nightlife, good food, great downtown. It would be a good second pick from NY, since NY is so expensive.

If those three months of cold would bother you that much, you might want to try somewher in Florida. The cost of living in Florida is similar to what your already used to. The problem with Florida is you will not find a city with the kind of infrastructure your looking for, with the exception of Miami, and even so Miami can be expensive.

You might want to try something like Charlotte, Atlanta, or Norfolk. Norfolk is not that big, but you have Virginia beach twelve miles away. You also have many mid size cities like Newport News, Tidewater, etc..

If you are looking to get a bit further from the south, you will have to deal with some cold weather. But to what you originally said about NY, that you could deal with the weather for NY. You might want to really consider Chicago. As far as nightlife, things to do, large downtown, you would not be dissapointed. Chicago has great food as well.

I would also reccommend cities like Portland and Seatle, however, Seattles pretty expensive, similar to NY and I know that Portland has become more expensive as well.

I did the same thing as you when I was younger, heck even when I was older. I am a traveler too...It's good to see other parts of the world.

Good look with your decision..

Rick
Thanks, Rick! You've offered the most helpful (and positive) advice. I have an aunt who lives in Chicago. But I don't know her very well. I've only met her once. I might give Chicago some consideration. Anyway, thanks again!
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Old 04-08-2009, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
16,729 posts, read 23,151,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ablau View Post
I'd love to be able to help you, but your question is a little broad... hmmm...

I think it might be a wise idea to spend a bit of the money you have to visit a couple of places. I would definitely want to check out the area I'm thinking of moving to, and as you haven't been to Florida yet, you might end up hating it!

Another major thing you should consider in your move is the weather. Do you like TX weather? Prefer colder? Warmer? New York to Florida is a BIG difference...haha... just one more thing for you to consider.

You say New Jersey is expensive (but close to NY). I know that certain parts of Connecticut are only like 1.5-2 hours from New York City. Is that any cheaper? There might be more to do if you live around the college area, especially for people around your age. That makes it easier to find apartments and roommates too!

I can try to give more advice based on your responses. I do think you're on target with avoiding California. I've lived in both southern CA and the Bay Area, and you would have a rough time finding something $600 in a decent part of town! Might not be impossible, but it's rough. Also, southern CA has TERRIBLE public transportation. So yeah, don't bother with CA...haha...
CT ranges from 30 minutes outside of NYC (among the priciest real estate in the nation) to 2 hours from NYC near the MA border (Hartford area - much more affordable but still significantly higher than Austin and most other areas your'e considering). You won't find anything cheaper than probably $800 for a 1br in the area in the cheapest metro which is Hartford. New Haven can be affordable but generally in that city, if it's cheap, it's cheap for a reason. If you can find something in New Haven's Westville or East Rock sections, then go for it. Walkable, you don't need a car for anything, and it is along the commuter rail to Manhattan. Plus there is a ton of culture/nightlife thanks to many universities (including Yale) in a small area.
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Old 04-08-2009, 01:24 PM
 
18 posts, read 31,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
I'd like to recommend that you change your plans a bit. Right now your sole focus should be to move to an area where you can find a stable full time job. To be honest, the economy is in absolutely awful shape in most areas of the country and especially in places like NY and NJ.

Take it from someone that is in the same boat as you (at least as far as wanting to move to a place that I like) and that is you are going to have to make some concessions for a few years until things improve. I am going to have to stay in the Kansas City area and can't move to New England, NY, PA or even OH or IN where I'd much rather be. At least my current job is stable and I can survive for a few years here until the economy and job picture improve making a move to a more desirable place a better possibility.

With your limited job skills and experience you may have to settle for a job that you don't like or want but it may mean the difference between keeping a roof over your head or winding up back home with your parents, or worse... I'd like to recommend Omaha to you because the job market is stable and the economy there is actually in fairly good shape. You'll find some of what you are looking for there but just not in abundance. Mass transit is lacking though and you would have to make sure that you live and work on a bus line.

A few years? In a few years I might have a kid! In a few years I (or you) might be dead!! I don't mean to sound so over the top, but I'm just sayin'. And Nebraska is completely OUT of the question, lol. I think it's harder when you have a well-paying job and are trying to move versus you having a low-paying job that can easily be found. I don't think I have that much to lose-- no kids; no well-paying, stable job. Plus, my mom would be more than willing to help me out financially, but to a certain extent of course; she's not exactly rich. (Not saying I'd be willing to put the burden on my mom).
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Old 04-08-2009, 01:51 PM
 
5,721 posts, read 9,085,203 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mimi1988 View Post
A few years? In a few years I might have a kid! In a few years I (or you) might be dead!! I don't mean to sound so over the top, but I'm just sayin'. And Nebraska is completely OUT of the question, lol. I think it's harder when you have a well-paying job and are trying to move versus you having a low-paying job that can easily be found. I don't think I have that much to lose-- no kids; no well-paying, stable job. Plus, my mom would be more than willing to help me out financially, but to a certain extent of course; she's not exactly rich. (Not saying I'd be willing to put the burden on my mom).
Good luck then. I hope you can find a job where ever you wind up. At the very least, try to make some contacts prior to moving and perhaps you can luck yourself into something.
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Old 04-08-2009, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Greater Los Angeles area (unfortunately)
177 posts, read 656,020 times
Reputation: 173
Another issue you might want to consider...

If you are looking for a low-paying job, they probably won't hire you until you're in the area. If you are interviewing for career, higher-level jobs, they'll often give you an employment letter formally offering you the position. This isn't something I see a fast food or retail place doing. So it might not be practical to apply for things before you move and have something lined up. You might have to change your strategy.

Do you have any friends/relatives/acquaintances, anything in any of the places you named who you can stay with while pursuing finding a job? Do you have enough $ saved to last you until you find something?

I am not trying to be negative or rude, I am just trying to be honest. I think it's pointless to stay behind in a place you hate if you can easily find a job similar to the one you have now. Just make sure to really prepare for it...
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Old 04-08-2009, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Greater Los Angeles area (unfortunately)
177 posts, read 656,020 times
Reputation: 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimi1988 View Post
It's just kind of hard to know who's opinions to trust because a lot of people on here appear to be very pessimistic. Just when I think I've found a city I read a whole bunch of negative comments about it (no jobs, high taxes, expensive housing, high crime rates, no scenery, etc. etc.).
Yes, I know that it can be difficult to learn about a place with lots of different information being given to you. Everyone has an opinion, and certain things that people don't like about the city other people might love!

Here's what I do when trying to get a handle on things. If just a few people say something negative, I chalk it up to opinion. If MANY people say negative things, I take it more into consideration that they might be on to something. For example, in considering researching a move to Portland, OR, I read MANY people saying the area has a really bad job market. I accept that as fact because I've heard it so many times, and know that I would need to line something up ahead of time if I decide to go there.

Be realistic, but form your own opinion. That's why I think it's so important to check out a city for yourself. Yes, I know it's expensive, but spending time somewhere will allow you to experience the negatives and make a really informed choice.

Oh, and for safety, some people might be more paranoid than others. Most major metropolitan cities have crime maps, so you can put in the address, zip code, etc of an area and it will reveal the types and numbers of crimes in that area. It's a good tool for checking out a neighborhood. You can also call the local police (NOT on the emergency line!) and ask about a certain part of time; they're usually pretty happy to help you (again, as long as you call the office and not 911!).
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