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View Poll Results: What are your feelings towards "the suburbs?"
I hate them very much. I hate almost everything about them. 26 16.35%
I don't care for them, but thats just my personality. No biggie. 65 40.88%
I like them. 44 27.67%
I love them, and could never live in a rural/urban area. 10 6.29%
Other. 14 8.81%
Voters: 159. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-12-2009, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington
2,317 posts, read 6,885,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
It depends on the suburb...some are acceptable, some aren't. Some determining factors are: proximity to the city, transit stations, character, amenities, traffic, etc.
Agreed.
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Old 04-12-2009, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
704 posts, read 1,325,963 times
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Having been raised in the suburbs outside of Seattle(Eastside to be exact) i absolutely hate them. I do however understand that people like them for having space, raising kids, owning a home, and other luxuries that the burbs have to offer. The outer suburbs of most cities are a lot more expensive then cities in most cases as I have found as you most likely need to a own car which adds huge costs(maintenance, insurance, gas, state fees), you waste more time traveling around from location to location(everything is spread out), and since you depend heavily on the conditions of roads if your city/county gov isn't up to par with keeping roads maintained and clear and it snows for example you might be spending it at home(this of course depends on conditions and location). I enjoy the social atmosphere, the walking, and the stress free lifestyle the city has to offer. Of course, each to his own.
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Old 04-12-2009, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Augusta GA
880 posts, read 2,529,827 times
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In general I am not a big fan of suburbs but the streetcar suburbs are ok to me. I am NOT a fan of the exurbs at all and the larger the lot size of the subdivisions, the less I like them (too much isolation from your neighbors and not a fan of yardwork). Not sure if I would call Lawrenceville GA an older suburb (more of an older small town that has had the suburbs surround it over the years).
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Old 04-12-2009, 11:48 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,412,818 times
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If you're talking the modern stereotypical suburb - the beige modern houses, small trees, cul-de-sacs, no sidewalks, businesses consisting of Applebee's and Macaroni Grills, then yes, I hate those suburbs and can't imagine ever being happy living there. To each his own, I guess.

On the other hand there are a lot of nice suburbs out there, too, many with the features often associated with city life. I didn't vote on the poll because I hate it when people paint all "cities" as dirty, crime-ridden, bad schools, etc. - some cities or some city neighborhoods might be awful, but others are pretty nice; same thing with the suburbs (especially when you're looking at a national level, as things vary so much by city and region).
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Old 04-12-2009, 11:53 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,682 posts, read 33,681,492 times
Reputation: 51867
I like places where I can get in my car and drive without a hassle on open roads. My car represents freedom. I like parking lots and just pulling up to curbs, not downtowns, parking garages or parallel parking (something I haven't done since my road test a bazillion years ago).

I don't like how cities smell, especially in the summer, or their incessant noise. I think they're overcrowded and when I leave one, I just want a shower. I don't think grafitti is art. I like trees---lots of them.

Not a fan of public transportation. I don't like waiting for it (really big time waster if you add up all the time you spend waiting for it in a year). I don't like rushing like a herd of sheep to get on and off it. I don't like being crowded into it. I don't like people jostling me or banging into me with their oversized pocketbooks, man bags, briefcases and lunch coolers. I don't like transferring. I don't like breakdowns, and now I think of public transportation as a threat in waiting. I don't like buggy eyed drunk/drugged/mentally ill homeless people yelling abominable things at me as I walk from public transportation to my actual destination. And I hate it when tourist groups ride public tranportation during rush hour or congregate in front of a subway stop during rush hour..

I love visiting rural America (for photo taking and events), do it frequently but I need more mental stimulation on a daily basis, more hours per day, now that I'm retired so I don't live in a rural town, I live in suburbia.

I don't love visiting big cities. I live right outside of Knoxville and have never been to its downtown in two years. When I lived on Long Island, I think I went to NYC 7 times (three were work-related) in 35 years. It was just the place I went through when going someplace else. When I lived in Maryland, I worked in downtown DC for 5 years and then thankfully spent 7 years working in Maryland. In those 12 years, I went to DC for non-work things maybe 4 times and 3 of the 4 times it was with visitors.

That being said, I lived in NYC for the first 7 years of my life and I lived in DC between the ages of 18 and 21 and loved both places then.
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Old 04-13-2009, 04:04 AM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
1,928 posts, read 4,631,417 times
Reputation: 1274
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I like places where I can get in my car and drive without a hassle on open roads. My car represents freedom. I like parking lots and just pulling up to curbs, not downtowns, parking garages or parallel parking (something I haven't done since my road test a bazillion years ago).

I don't like how cities smell, especially in the summer, or their incessant noise. I think they're overcrowded and when I leave one, I just want a shower. I don't think grafitti is art. I like trees---lots of them.

Not a fan of public transportation. I don't like waiting for it (really big time waster if you add up all the time you spend waiting for it in a year). I don't like rushing like a herd of sheep to get on and off it. I don't like being crowded into it. I don't like people jostling me or banging into me with their oversized pocketbooks, man bags, briefcases and lunch coolers. I don't like transferring. I don't like breakdowns, and now I think of public transportation as a threat in waiting. I don't like buggy eyed drunk/drugged/mentally ill homeless people yelling abominable things at me as I walk from public transportation to my actual destination. And I hate it when tourist groups ride public tranportation during rush hour or congregate in front of a subway stop during rush hour..

I love visiting rural America (for photo taking and events), do it frequently but I need more mental stimulation on a daily basis, more hours per day, now that I'm retired so I don't live in a rural town, I live in suburbia.

I don't love visiting big cities. I live right outside of Knoxville and have never been to its downtown in two years. When I lived on Long Island, I think I went to NYC 7 times (three were work-related) in 35 years. It was just the place I went through when going someplace else. When I lived in Maryland, I worked in downtown DC for 5 years and then thankfully spent 7 years working in Maryland. In those 12 years, I went to DC for non-work things maybe 4 times and 3 of the 4 times it was with visitors.

That being said, I lived in NYC for the first 7 years of my life and I lived in DC between the ages of 18 and 21 and loved both places then.
Next to rural areas, I like suburbs, especially the exurbs that border rural areas. I echo a lot of what LauraC says. I'm especially tied to my car and like it that way. I'm not a big city guy and don't like mass transit and being crowded - can't stand high density areas. In my opinion, cities are to be avoided.
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Old 04-13-2009, 07:15 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,131 posts, read 23,648,900 times
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I dislike them in general because of the incredible waste and selfishness they represent, but there are certainly some suburbs that are better than others. I like having the freedom of biking or walking to where I need to go without ever really thinking about parking things. I like being able to have all I need within the neighborhood. Of course, a lot of city nabes can be fairly terrible, but almost every city has some good ones (though some have more and better).
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Old 04-13-2009, 07:42 AM
 
2,486 posts, read 2,360,151 times
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Wow, I actually agree with most people in this thread. I like many suburbs. There are a lot of old 1920s street car suburbs around here that I like such as Oakmont, Mnt. Lebanon, Swissvale, and Edgewood. They are walkable, have their own downtown, unique houses, and decent transportation to get into the city.

The ones I hate or dispise are the ones I grew up in. The exurban development 30 miles from the city, and 10 miles from the nearest real suburb for groceries, movies, or practically anything. There is no logic in these sprawling un-environmental subdivisions. The people create them to be out with the dear, but put half an acre lots next too each other and make a very ugly looking neighborhood worse then where they came from. They add traffic, create higher taxes to build larger roads for their subdivisions, have no public transportation, and everything else about them is just horrible. The one I grew up in didn't even have sidewalks, and there was nowhere to go without a car. All sense of a community or town is lost in these crappy subdivision. I would rather live in Hell then live in one of those.

My parents always say, "When you have kids you will live in a subdivision". Trust me, If I ever had kids I would never put them through the torture of being raised in an exurban subdivision. Maybe a 1920s street car suburb, not even a 1950s more sprawly suburb that still has amenities (like Monroeville), but never never never a 1990s sprawly exurban development.
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Old 04-13-2009, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,236,781 times
Reputation: 1819
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Not a fan of public transportation. I don't like waiting for it (really big time waster if you add up all the time you spend waiting for it in a year). I don't like rushing like a herd of sheep to get on and off it. I don't like being crowded into it. I don't like people jostling me or banging into me with their oversized pocketbooks, man bags, briefcases and lunch coolers. I don't like transferring. I don't like breakdowns, and now I think of public transportation as a threat in waiting. I don't like buggy eyed drunk/drugged/mentally ill homeless people yelling abominable things at me as I walk from public transportation to my actual destination. And I hate it when tourist groups ride public tranportation during rush hour or congregate in front of a subway stop during rush hour..

How you described public transportation is how I feel about taking it here in NYC. I feel like it's a big waste of time. True, it's cheap and efficient, but I really hate relying on that to take me to work. Sometimes I wait 25 minutes in the cold for the bus when it should be coming every 8 minutes or so. It takes me about double the time compared to driving. Don't even get me started on how many times I've gotten hurt by people shoving their big bags against my legs on a crowded bus...lol. This is why I'm excited to move back to Long Island and have a car. I still have buses and trains in case I can't use my car, but I like relying on a car more.
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Old 04-13-2009, 08:50 AM
 
Location: The Lone Star State
8,031 posts, read 7,633,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
It depends on the suburb...some are acceptable, some aren't. Some determining factors are: proximity to the city, transit stations, character, amenities, traffic, etc.
I'm in agreement with this.
Not all suburbs are the same.
The better suburbs are those that (1) aren't too far out from the major city meaning not more than about 20 miles and (2) have most of what people would need everyday available instead of just being bedroom communities and (3) have attracted or grown out of being employment centers in themselves, having some companies and jobs.
If I missed something, tell me.
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