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View Poll Results: What are your feelings towards "the suburbs?"
I hate them very much. I hate almost everything about them. 26 16.35%
I don't care for them, but thats just my personality. No biggie. 65 40.88%
I like them. 44 27.67%
I love them, and could never live in a rural/urban area. 10 6.29%
Other. 14 8.81%
Voters: 159. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-21-2009, 12:38 AM
 
13,570 posts, read 22,018,249 times
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Whether suburb, urban, exurban, rural...

The point is that we should have viable, pedestrian-friendly (or at least semi-pedestrian friendly), sustainable,neighborhoods/living areas with access to public transit throughout our metro areas.

The suburbs can and should be retrofitted/redeveloped over the next several decades. Malls can and should be retrofitted/redeveloped as well.

No new old-style malls should not be built. And most metro areas really should not be expanding into undeveloped land anymore.
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Old 04-21-2009, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
1,014 posts, read 3,117,775 times
Reputation: 483
Older urban suburbs are cool if they are safe, affordable ,have access to decent mass transit and are walkable to shops, restaurants ,bars etc. The ones I do not care for are the ones that have cookie cutter houses, wide hard to cross 4-6-8 lane roads, and it's almost mandatory to have a car to go any where. Those burbs tend to be more expensive than the older ones. I myself chose not to drive because there are too many aggressive drivers on the highways. Fortunately I was able to find an affordable city neighborhood to live in that is not too dangerous crimewise. I am also fortunate to have a husband who does all the driving so we get by with only one car.
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Old 04-21-2009, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
1,014 posts, read 3,117,775 times
Reputation: 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeyHolliday! View Post
Having been raised in the suburbs outside of Seattle(Eastside to be exact) i absolutely hate them. I do however understand that people like them for having space, raising kids, owning a home, and other luxuries that the burbs have to offer. The outer suburbs of most cities are a lot more expensive then cities in most cases as I have found as you most likely need to a own car which adds huge costs(maintenance, insurance, gas, state fees), you waste more time traveling around from location to location(everything is spread out), and since you depend heavily on the conditions of roads if your city/county gov isn't up to par with keeping roads maintained and clear and it snows for example you might be spending it at home(this of course depends on conditions and location). I enjoy the social atmosphere, the walking, and the stress free lifestyle the city has to offer. Of course, each to his own.
I soooo agree with you.You have totally hit on the nail.
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Old 04-21-2009, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
1,014 posts, read 3,117,775 times
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I like to addess something about another type of suburb : "ghetto burb" or "slumburb". These are either older inner urban suburbs that have been bad for decades or postwar burbs built in the 50s to 80s but declined in recent years. Those areas have bad schools, high crime,gangs and the poor and lower class live in them. In the former , they once had thriving shopping areas but the businesses closed or moved away. Now there is almost nothing but crumbling buildings with boarded up storefronts. Some of the examples are: Chester and parts of Norristown ( Philadelphia) ,Maywood and Cicero ( Chicago) , Wilkinsburg, Braddock and Homestead ( Pittsburgh) and East Cleveland , Ohio ( not to mention small cities in metro areas: ie Camden NJ, Gary, Ind., Newark NJ and East St. Louis, Ill.) As far as the newer latter ones are concerned there are abandoned strip malls, lawns that neglected ,section 8 renters moving into the ranchs, Cape Cods and split levels and overall blight. Some examples of these are Lincoln Hts. (Cincinnati) ,Urbancrest ( Columbus Ohio ) , Crestmont ( Philadelphia) and Ford Hts ( Chicago). So it goes to show not all suburbs = good and all city neighborhoods = bad. (I could give you many examples but I will save that for some other time).
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Old 04-21-2009, 02:45 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,265,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otters21 View Post
I like to addess something about another type of suburb : "ghetto burb" or "slumburb". These are either older inner urban suburbs that have been bad for decades or postwar burbs built in the 50s to 80s but declined in recent years. Those areas have bad schools, high crime,gangs and the poor and lower class live in them. In the former , they once had thriving shopping areas but the businesses closed or moved away. Now there is almost nothing but crumbling buildings with boarded up storefronts. Some of the examples are: Chester and parts of Norristown ( Philadelphia) ,Maywood and Cicero ( Chicago) , Wilkinsburg, Braddock and Homestead ( Pittsburgh) and East Cleveland , Ohio ( not to mention small cities in metro areas: ie Camden NJ, Gary, Ind., Newark NJ and East St. Louis, Ill.) As far as the newer latter ones are concerned there are abandoned strip malls, lawns that neglected ,section 8 renters moving into the ranchs, Cape Cods and split levels and overall blight. Some examples of these are Lincoln Hts. (Cincinnati) ,Urbancrest ( Columbus Ohio ) , Crestmont ( Philadelphia) and Ford Hts ( Chicago). So it goes to show not all suburbs = good and all city neighborhoods = bad. (I could give you many examples but I will save that for some other time).
Those are the types of areas that are ripe and ready for gentrification...real estate becomes very cheap and attracts creative/adventurous people, and then the improvements begin to attract the masses. It's a cycle that we have been in for many years now.
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Old 04-22-2009, 02:09 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, USA
3,133 posts, read 8,332,967 times
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You need a good school system to attract the masses.
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Old 04-22-2009, 03:37 AM
 
2,057 posts, read 4,869,174 times
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I am open to the suburbs.

Those suburbs have to be within 30 minutes of a major city though
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Old 04-22-2009, 05:05 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,893 posts, read 7,653,336 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterRabbit View Post
You need a good school system to attract the masses.
How do we get good urban schools when middle-class flight to the suburbs is one of the primary reasons they're in trouble in the first place?
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Old 04-22-2009, 07:54 AM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,265,202 times
Reputation: 2781
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterRabbit View Post
You need a good school system to attract the masses.
Not really...a large part of the masses don't have and don't intend to have any reason to "need a good school system". Anyway, there are many gentrifying areas that do have a good school system.
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Old 04-22-2009, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,562,228 times
Reputation: 3232
I despise suburbs. Everything about them makes me sick! The cookie-cutter houses, the traffic-choked streets, the gated communities, the "fakeness," the stupidly-named subdivisions. Give me a small town anyday! Even a big city would be better than the burbs.
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