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Old 04-13-2009, 07:54 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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The Civil War? Or much later, like the 1920s, or even the 1960s?
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Old 04-13-2009, 08:14 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
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In my part of the country at least, I think the Unions have a lot to do with it.

Michigan is actually pretty conservative socially, but the Democratic party traditionally sides with the Union, and that's where the votes go.

We might technically be a Blue State, but if you dig a little deeper, I think we are closer to the South in a lot of ways politically than we are to the east or west coasts. I think that's probably the case with Ohio too.
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Old 04-13-2009, 08:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
In my part of the country at least, I think the Unions have a lot to do with it.

Michigan is actually pretty conservative socially, but the Democratic party traditionally sides with the Union, and that's where the votes go.

We might technically be a Blue State, but if you dig a little deeper, I think we are closer to the South in a lot of ways politically than we are to the east or west coasts. I think that's probably the case with Ohio too.
as evidenced by the fact that once you get out of range of Chicago radio stations, you hear nothing but country and christian channels in Michigan.

on that note, i will never rent a car without a CD player ever again.
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Old 04-13-2009, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
The Civil War? Or much later, like the 1920s, or even the 1960s?
I think it was always less conservative than the south. What changed is Democrats being associated with liberalism and Republicans being associated with conservativism. Southern Democrats used to be largely conservative and many still are. I'm conservative and I would vote for a conservative Democrat over a liberal Republican.
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Old 04-13-2009, 08:55 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
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I think this coincided with the waves of eastern European immigration into the northern cities in the 19th and early 20th centuries. I also think that the agrarian nature and relative isolation associated with living in the South fostered the spirit of rugged individualism that has long been associated with conservative values.
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Old 04-13-2009, 09:05 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
The Civil War? Or much later, like the 1920s, or even the 1960s?
Probably earlier than that.. I'd guess it was prior to the war of southern independence.

In order to answer your question, you need to define conservative. I equate conservative with libertarian. Others see it as an issue of morality or religion. Others see it as an issue of tolerance or egalitarianism.

But in general terms I would say that immigration is the key factor in the political differences between north and south. The south was mostly african slaves and white anglo protestants, and it stayed relatively simple and segregated for hundreds of years. The northeast was a dynamic mixture of jews, catholics, protestants, southern Europeans, eastern Europeans, Scandanavians, etc. Climate and agriculture play a role, causing much of the north to be urban, and much of the south to be rural. Urban areas are generally not as conservative.

Last edited by le roi; 04-13-2009 at 09:19 AM..
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Old 04-13-2009, 09:12 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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The North was NEVER less conservative than the South. The Republican Party when it started out was left-leaning like the Democrats are today. Over-time they switched roles and the North began favoring the Democrats.
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Old 04-13-2009, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
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What kind of conservatism are you referring to? Social or fiscal conservatism? Northern folks can still be pretty fiscally conservative. Social conservatism is where you see the real divide, and even that issue isn't so much north vs. south as it is urban vs. rural, IMO.
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Old 04-13-2009, 10:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by rubber_factory View Post
Probably earlier than that.. I'd guess it was prior to the war of southern independence.

In order to answer your question, you need to define conservative. I equate conservative with libertarian. Others see it as an issue of morality or religion. Others see it as an issue of tolerance or egalitarianism.

But in general terms I would say that immigration is the key factor in the political differences between north and south. The south was mostly african slaves and white anglo protestants, and it stayed relatively simple and segregated for hundreds of years. The northeast was a dynamic mixture of jews, catholics, protestants, southern Europeans, eastern Europeans, Scandanavians, etc. Climate and agriculture play a role, causing much of the north to be urban, and much of the south to be rural. Urban areas are generally not as conservative.
Actually, some Southern cities like Charleston, New Orleans and Tampa, among others, received their share of those immigrant groups too. That's relatively speaking.

I agree with another poster that stated that the South is split in terms of urban vs. rural, in many cases.
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Old 04-13-2009, 10:38 AM
 
Location: where my heart is
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Social issues. That seems to be the biggest divide, and that has been going on for at least 20 years now. Religion, specifically the Bible Belt of the South, is probably key to this.

Today it seems you cannot separate the fiscal conservatism from the social conservatism. You get the whole kit n kaboodle.
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