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Old 04-14-2009, 05:34 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,131 posts, read 9,901,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ainulinale View Post
I agree that the Youngstown area and Beaver Falls are very similar to each other. But if you think Northeast Ohio and Pittsburgh are the same than perhaps you need a new pair of glasses or contacts. Topography, structure and architecture are vastly different and even the demographics have their differences.
Actually Cortlandgirl is raising a good point. Historically the Midwest was settled by people from New York/New England (the Hoosiers), Pennsylvania and the Upper South. Suprisingly the biggest source of early pioneers was not NY/NE but Pennsylvania, and much of the actual Midwestern accents are related (although changed) to Pennsylvania. Even parts of upstate NY itself (especially in WNY and the Southern Tier) had more Pennsylvania influence than New England or Dutch.
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Old 04-14-2009, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,565,301 times
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^ I've said on here many times that I think Northeast Ohio is a transition zone between the Midwest and the Northeast. However, that has little to do with the similarities and dissimilarities between Pittsburgh and that area. As far as I'm concerned, Pittsburgh is fully a Northeastern city with its strongest influences from the "East Coast" and "Appalachia". In my opinion, Cleveland and the rest of the Northeast Ohio is the Midwest/Great Lakes with Northeastern influence (after all, that area was originally held by CT).
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Old 04-14-2009, 08:10 PM
 
5,721 posts, read 9,086,134 times
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We've been over this topic several times during the course of the last year or so. PA is a Northeastern state and while it is not East Coast, it is definitely not Midwestern in nature.
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Old 04-15-2009, 03:45 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, USA
3,133 posts, read 8,333,737 times
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I notice an almost distinct border between W.Pa. and E. Ohio. When I read personals ads it's common to read an Ohio woman's ad who is looking for a Christian man in particular and sometimes they go on about how important loving the lord, etc., is in their life. It's rare to see a Pa. woman's ad talking about anything religious. I've also noticed this about Michigan women and the religion, but not as much as Ohioans.
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Old 04-15-2009, 08:36 PM
 
421 posts, read 1,404,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsmith View Post
I don't think any part of Pennsylvania is mid-western, even the far west part of the state. In fact, I would sooner say that eastern Ohio is more eastern in nature. Still, I would say that western Pennsylvania, eastern Ohio, and northern West Virginia belong to a northern appalacian region that is not quite eastern nor midwestern.
I agree. This subject has been discussed in previous threads. I think the regional label "Midwest Appalachian" describes our neck of the woods the best. Places like Erie, PA, or Wheeling are definitely different from the Midwest, South, and Northeast. The places West of Pittsburgh like Erie and Sharon are more like the Midwest than the Northeast or, especially, the South. East of Pittsburgh and Buffalo, things start to feel a little more Northeastern, but still pretty different from New England, Jersey, or Eastern PA East of the Susquehanna. Buffalo feels fairly NOrtheastern, but not Pittsburgh or Erie. They are most akin to the Midwest, and that is a positive. They have the cultural accoutrements of Eastern cities but are slower paced and more friendly than the East. This makes them feel more like cities like Toledo or Chicago than a place in the Northeast.

The speech pattern thing has also been mentioned with regards to Pittsburgh before. Pittsburgheese is unique. It has much in common with the dialect heard in Columbus, Indy, Cincy, and St. Louis, though, as far as pronunciations. Aforesaid lower Midwest cities are places you'll encounter a "car dillership", a thief who "stills" stuff, cars that "need fixed", and jobs that "need done".
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Old 04-15-2009, 08:49 PM
 
421 posts, read 1,404,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CortlandGirl79 View Post
I live in Northeast Ohio and Western Pa is very, very similar to where i live. I always say both are part of a buffer zone between the NE and Midwest. I live app. 13 miles from the Pa border and trust me, there is no difference to me. There is no way that my side of the border is culturally midwestern and 13 miles away is different. Same if you are calling Sharon, Pa culturally Northeastern and saying Warren, Ohio is not. I say both locations are a mix of NE and midwest.
CortlandGirl has it just right. We both live in the same section of Ohio, near Youngstown/Warren, and very close to the PA border. Sharon and New Castle, PA are each less than 20 miles from Youngstown. To us locals, these PA towns do not feel different culturally from nearby Ohio towns. The only differences in living on either side of the border are in things like having to inspect your car yearly in PA, and not having to ever inspect your car in Ohio. Our whole area has a feel that is different from Cleveland and locations from there West, but more like cities like Toledo than places in Eastern PA. Other than our hillier terrain and slightly older and rustier factories, our section is much like Southern MI. Away from the bigger towns, agriculture is big around here. This area and Jersey have absolutely nothing in common. We are halfway from NYC to Chicago, and have far more in common with the latter.
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Old 04-17-2009, 09:39 AM
 
4,247 posts, read 9,712,249 times
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In my opinion, derived from 10+ years dealing with municipal officials and communities from all around PA, it's impossible to classify all of PA together, culturally. I see four main tendencies: Northeast Corridor, New England, Appalachia, and Lake States, with an overlay or an underlay of "Dutchy", and a complicating factor of "coalie". Lake States influence would be like the industrial Midwest, not the agricultural Midwest.
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Old 04-17-2009, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
6,495 posts, read 10,798,327 times
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Haven't you guys heard that saying about PA -- Pittsburgh on one side, Philly on the other, and Alabama in between?
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Old 04-17-2009, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
2,237 posts, read 6,565,301 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ki0eh View Post
In my opinion, derived from 10+ years dealing with municipal officials and communities from all around PA, it's impossible to classify all of PA together, culturally. I see four main tendencies: Northeast Corridor, New England, Appalachia, and Lake States, with an overlay or an underlay of "Dutchy", and a complicating factor of "coalie". Lake States influence would be like the industrial Midwest, not the agricultural Midwest.
In that case then, the Northeast Corridor would undoubtedly be broken up into muliple cultural regions.
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Old 04-17-2009, 11:06 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,990 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ainulinale View Post
^ I've said on here many times that I think Northeast Ohio is a transition zone between the Midwest and the Northeast. However, that has little to do with the similarities and dissimilarities between Pittsburgh and that area. As far as I'm concerned, Pittsburgh is fully a Northeastern city with its strongest influences from the "East Coast" and "Appalachia". In my opinion, Cleveland and the rest of the Northeast Ohio is the Midwest/Great Lakes with Northeastern influence (after all, that area was originally held by CT).
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
We've been over this topic several times during the course of the last year or so. PA is a Northeastern state and while it is not East Coast, it is definitely not Midwestern in nature.
I agree. You can argue this till the cows come home, but Pennsylvania is an eastern state, and the people who live there are easterners. It is especially funny to me, a native Pennsylvanian, now living in Colorado, to think that anyone sees Pennsylvania as midwest. I can assure you no one out here thinks Pennsylvania is the midwest. Even when I lived in Illinois, people thought I was an easterner, and I grew up about as far west in Pennsylvania as you can get, in the western part of a county on the western edge, Beaver Co.
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