U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-16-2009, 12:24 PM
 
943 posts, read 2,780,809 times
Reputation: 694

Advertisements

Remember the good old days when the suburbs were a place you would move to to escape bad schools, crime, grime and urban density? Well those days are gone.

It seems like the suburbs have more urban density, less trees, more crime, poorer schools and more ethnic diversity than the inner cities.

Is there any old fashioned suburbs any more and where are they?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-16-2009, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Teaneck, NJ
1,576 posts, read 5,136,811 times
Reputation: 683
So you're saying the ethnic mix is a bad thing?
It's America.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 12:57 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,413,703 times
Reputation: 8936
You're generalizing way too much, plenty of suburbs are still the typical safe, family friendly suburbs while many have also declined to be just as bad as inner cities. Not all suburbs are the same.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 01:24 PM
 
1,107 posts, read 2,685,531 times
Reputation: 473
sav858 is right, you are generalizing, but it may have to do with cities becoming more expensive than the suburbs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Columbus, Ohio
1,709 posts, read 2,651,969 times
Reputation: 1195
I can't relate to the first part because this isn't the case here. If you are looking for old fashioned suburbs, try moving to metro areas with horrible inner cities (like here, for example). I think Birmingham has less diverse suburbs than Jackson, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 01:39 PM
 
56,609 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505
I think it depends on where you live too. Even the more rough looking or blue collar suburbs in my area are still mostly White and even if they are "diverse", it's not even questionable that they are mostly White.

Also, I think what another poster said is true in terms of some suburbs being more affordable that many urban neighborhoods.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 01:46 PM
 
Location: West Cobb County, GA (Atlanta metro)
9,188 posts, read 30,231,422 times
Reputation: 5131
The reasons are going to vary city-by-city. There is no one answer, and some cities do not experience this problem.

In Atlanta for instance, a few years ago they started tearing down the public housing "projects" in the inner city to make way for "mixed use developments". These developments only have a small section reserved for what they call "affordable housing" - the rest are higher-dollar properties and retail spaces.

Well - the thousands of people (literally) who lived in the old projects didn't just disappear. They were given special vouchers and program assistance so they could rent homes or apartments anywhere in the metro area where they could find a place that accepted the vouchers. Section 8, etc etc.. Hence, in the past the lower-income and what some would call "bad" neighborhoods that were once condensed into small areas intown, now are spread out throughout the metro area.

So some suburbs here such as Duluth, Stone Mountain, Jonesboro... area which years ago were actually once sought out by new residents, are now acquiring a number of people using vouchers to rent homes/apartments. Unfortunately, many of these lower income households are single parent homes (mother only) with no father, and many times with several kids and/or teens in tow, who may have a habit of finding trouble where they live. Hence, crime goes up, values go down, and entire suburbs shift.

There is a distinct difference between low income and low class - I've known plenty of lower income people who had lots of class (and high income people with low class). But here at least, when large concentrations of the lower income "vouchered" take up residence in a particular suburb, it does seem to be having a negative impact. And remember that on top of this, some cities like Atlanta have also seen a huge increase in the number of illegal immigrants taking residence here - and most of the time they will seek out home rentals in the suburbs where a number of them can share one house.

But again, that is Atlanta. Some other places will have similar stories, while others will not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 02:27 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,270,232 times
Reputation: 2782
Quote:
Originally Posted by atlantagreg30127 View Post
The reasons are going to vary city-by-city. There is no one answer, and some cities do not experience this problem.

In Atlanta for instance, a few years ago they started tearing down the public housing "projects" in the inner city to make way for "mixed use developments". These developments only have a small section reserved for what they call "affordable housing" - the rest are higher-dollar properties and retail spaces.

Well - the thousands of people (literally) who lived in the old projects didn't just disappear. They were given special vouchers and program assistance so they could rent homes or apartments anywhere in the metro area where they could find a place that accepted the vouchers. Section 8, etc etc.. Hence, in the past the lower-income and what some would call "bad" neighborhoods that were once condensed into small areas intown, now are spread out throughout the metro area.

So some suburbs here such as Duluth, Stone Mountain, Jonesboro... area which years ago were actually once sought out by new residents, are now acquiring a number of people using vouchers to rent homes/apartments. Unfortunately, many of these lower income households are single parent homes (mother only) with no father, and many times with several kids and/or teens in tow, who may have a habit of finding trouble where they live. Hence, crime goes up, values go down, and entire suburbs shift.

There is a distinct difference between low income and low class - I've known plenty of lower income people who had lots of class (and high income people with low class). But here at least, when large concentrations of the lower income "vouchered" take up residence in a particular suburb, it does seem to be having a negative impact. And remember that on top of this, some cities like Atlanta have also seen a huge increase in the number of illegal immigrants taking residence here - and most of the time they will seek out home rentals in the suburbs where a number of them can share one house.

But again, that is Atlanta. Some other places will have similar stories, while others will not.
Yes, I think many cities are razing the old public housing in favor of mixed-income developments...which doesn't account for all of the displaced tenants. I'm sure there are many cases of this same phenomenon - the poor have to live somewhere, and I think the concensus is that we don't want them on the streets of downtown.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 02:27 PM
 
210 posts, read 770,137 times
Reputation: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weekend Traveler View Post
Remember the good old days when the suburbs were a place you would move to to escape bad schools, crime, grime and urban density? Well those days are gone.

It seems like the suburbs have more urban density, less trees, more crime, poorer schools and more ethnic diversity than the inner cities.

Is there any old fashioned suburbs any more and where are they?
You are trippin if you think the suburbs are more dense, more crime, poorer schools, and more diverse. Where do you come up with this nonsense?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 07:24 PM
 
1,084 posts, read 3,473,211 times
Reputation: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_810 View Post
You are trippin if you think the suburbs are more dense, more crime, poorer schools, and more diverse. Where do you come up with this nonsense?


its not non sense, it vary's for cities, in miami its true. many of its southern suburbs, and all of north have bad schools, high crime and poverty.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top