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Old 11-14-2010, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK, USA
31 posts, read 137,822 times
Reputation: 23

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaBoom View Post
Um, yes. Were you absent from geography class that day, or did your school just suck?

Atlantic coastal plain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Spade meant the Plains in the central part of the U.S.
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Old 11-16-2010, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,396 posts, read 59,890,532 times
Reputation: 54044
Quote:
Originally Posted by iPwn View Post
ohio is as far east as florida.
It is indeed. However, Ohio does not border New York ... as a previous poster seems to think.
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Old 11-16-2010, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,748,384 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaBoom View Post
Um, yes. Were you absent from geography class that day, or did your school just suck?

Atlantic coastal plain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Native Floridans do not, nor ever will, consider themselves from a Plains state.
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Old 01-05-2011, 04:10 PM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,769,752 times
Reputation: 1464
Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyVaz1009 View Post
People are still saying eastern Colorado is Western. Alright, if you go to the border between Kansas and Colorado and look north, you'll see a wheat field on the right and a wheat field on the left. They are the same. The West begins when the mountains begin.
Culturally the eastern plains of Colorado have a lot in common with far western Kansas. But economically they are 100% tied into Denver. Of course the same thing could be said for the western tier of Kansas and Nebraska.

A number of counties in Nebraska and three counties in Kansas are on the mountain time zone because of the ties to Denver. The same thing could be said for South and North Dakota (though North Dakota is far enough from Denver that it probably is looking more towards Montana). Looking at the border between the mountain time zone and the central time zone is probably instructive.

Part of the reason why it's hard to say exactly where the midwest ends and the west begins is that there's just so few people who live on the eastern plains (or the Kansas / Nebraska high plains, for that matter). It's not like the farm areas further east that have a large rural population checkerboarded between small towns. A lot of that is due to the dry climate -- farmers need supplies of water for productive agriculture and there isn't much water in Eastern Colorado.

In a lot of ways I'd say that the high plains are a bit of a buffer zone between the west (Denver) the midwest (central and Eastern Kansas), and the south (Texas). With so few people living there, it's more of a no-mans-land than clearly belonging to one region or the other.
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Old 01-06-2011, 04:01 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,990,519 times
Reputation: 2967
^
This is a good discussion of how the Midwest fades into the west across the plains. Maybe the 100th meridian could be a good rough divide (which is sort of a rainfall divide between arid vs not-so-arid conditions).
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Old 01-07-2011, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
1,372 posts, read 2,598,258 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
^
This is a good discussion of how the Midwest fades into the west across the plains. Maybe the 100th meridian could be a good rough divide (which is sort of a rainfall divide between arid vs not-so-arid conditions).
so the entire midwest is in the eastern half of the country?
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:05 PM
 
1,054 posts, read 1,835,441 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geechie North View Post
Lebanon, Kansas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


"Lebanon is a city in Smith County, Kansas, United States, in the north central part of the state. The population was 303 at the 2000 census. In 1918, a scientific survey established that the geographic center of the contiguous (Lower 48) United States lies near the town and a monument was subsequently erected at the site.[3]"

Have to ask them how they derived the center.


As far as citing Democrats to prove somewhere is not 'Southern', well that fails on the basis of why the 'Solid South' was the Solid South, until 1965 or there abouts.

Some areas have changed-over to GOP faster than others in the South.
The Nebraska/Kansas border is the border between geographical north/south part of the US. Nebraska and Kansas are called the central plains.
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Old 01-07-2011, 05:56 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,077 posts, read 5,454,707 times
Reputation: 4333
My explanation of the Midwest by SONG (just ignore the references to non-Midwestern states...)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dkEvLjj_rqc
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Old 01-07-2011, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
884 posts, read 1,525,241 times
Reputation: 737
Quote:
Originally Posted by tfox View Post
Culturally the eastern plains of Colorado have a lot in common with far western Kansas. But economically they are 100% tied into Denver. Of course the same thing could be said for the western tier of Kansas and Nebraska.

A number of counties in Nebraska and three counties in Kansas are on the mountain time zone because of the ties to Denver. The same thing could be said for South and North Dakota (though North Dakota is far enough from Denver that it probably is looking more towards Montana). Looking at the border between the mountain time zone and the central time zone is probably instructive.

Part of the reason why it's hard to say exactly where the midwest ends and the west begins is that there's just so few people who live on the eastern plains (or the Kansas / Nebraska high plains, for that matter). It's not like the farm areas further east that have a large rural population checkerboarded between small towns. A lot of that is due to the dry climate -- farmers need supplies of water for productive agriculture and there isn't much water in Eastern Colorado.

In a lot of ways I'd say that the high plains are a bit of a buffer zone between the west (Denver) the midwest (central and Eastern Kansas), and the south (Texas). With so few people living there, it's more of a no-mans-land than clearly belonging to one region or the other.
You do bring up a great point. It could also be taken a step further and saying that the area can be its own no-man's-land-type region from the Texas panhandle through western North Dakota that is split up into the main US regions due to state boundaries. It lacks a major city though, unless you'd include Denver as its major city that simply has "a view of the mountain west" haha. Or Amarillo, maybe...

But that whole deal seems kind of off topic so we probably shouldn't get too much into it.
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Old 01-07-2011, 10:14 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,414 posts, read 7,714,971 times
Reputation: 3059
[quote=michigan83;17307895]My explanation of the Midwest by SONG (just ignore the references to non-Midwestern states...)

If my ears didn't fail me the non-Midwestern states he mentions in the song are New Mexico (Santa Fe), Texas (Amarillo), and Oklahoma.

Sounded like everything else was a tried&true Midwestern state. Good song. First time I've ever heard it; I like Jason Aldean's rocker-country style. Sounded pretty good even to this old man.
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