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Old 11-15-2011, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Florida and New England
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Does anyone have a link to a site with historical data by school back to the 1950s? This would be useful for research more longitudinal than what schooldigger provides.

Also, schooldigger does not seem to recognize high schools that have closed in the last few years: only schools currently open are listed. Even name changes seem to cause a data loss.
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Old 11-19-2011, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
3,070 posts, read 10,708,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westender View Post
Does anyone have a link to a site with historical data by school back to the 1950s? This would be useful for research more longitudinal than what schooldigger provides.

Also, schooldigger does not seem to recognize high schools that have closed in the last few years: only schools currently open are listed. Even name changes seem to cause a data loss.
No, I've only seen one site that goes back to the 70s and it was only for the year 1970 I believe, and I think it was for the entire district.

I might have a solution for the 2nd part though, on schooldigger try searching for "city" instead of "district" and it usually shows schools that have closed within the last few years, they will appear on the map and the list, but as "closed". This has worked good for me. If it's a big city you might have to zoom in to the schools location to see it though because the site can only have so many markers on the map. See if this works for you.
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Old 11-19-2011, 04:10 PM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,581,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chitown85 View Post

If you were to go to a school with a large poor white population in rural Tennessee, the learning is just as bad as if you went to an inner city school.
Seriously, do you believe this nonsense?
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Old 11-20-2011, 11:00 AM
 
Location: IN
20,853 posts, read 35,976,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
Seriously, do you believe this nonsense?
Look at the educational attainment for Campbell or Hancock counties in TN as a couple examples.
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:58 AM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,581,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Look at the educational attainment for Campbell or Hancock counties in TN as a couple examples.
You exaggerate things greatly.

Campbell County Comprehensive High School
Hamilton High School (Memphis)<--Inner City School

Grade 9:
English 1: (Campbell County) School Proficiency level: 52% (-9%)
English 1: State Proficiency Avg: 61%
English 1: Hamilton High (Memphis) 20% (-41%)

Algebra 1: (Campbell County) School Proficiency level: 62% (+15%)
Algebra 1: State Proficiency Avg: 47%
Algebra 1: Hamilton High (Memphis) 4% (-43%)


Grade 10:
English 2: (Campbell County) School Proficiency level: 66% (+5%)
English 2: State Proficiency Avg: 61%
English 2: Hamilton High (Memphis) 17% (-44%)

Biology 1: (Campbell County) School Proficiency level: 31% (-18%)
Biology 1: State Proficiency Avg: 49%
Biology 1: Hamilton High (Memphis) 7% (-42%)


Grade 11:
Writing: (Campbell County) School Proficiency level: 94% (+4%)
Writing: State Proficiency Avg: 90%
Writing: Hamilton High (Memphis) 86% (-4%)

U.S. History (Campbell County) School Proficiency level: 100% (+3%)
U.S. History: State Proficiency Avg: 97%
U.S. History: Hamilton High (Memphis) 86% (-9%)

http://www.greatschools.org/modperl/...om..HeaderLink
http://www.greatschools.org/modperl/...om..HeaderLink
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Old 11-22-2011, 08:11 PM
 
Location: IN
20,853 posts, read 35,976,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
You exaggerate things greatly.

Campbell County Comprehensive High School
Hamilton High School (Memphis)<--Inner City School

Grade 9:
English 1: (Campbell County) School Proficiency level: 52% (-9%)
English 1: State Proficiency Avg: 61%
English 1: Hamilton High (Memphis) 20% (-41%)

Algebra 1: (Campbell County) School Proficiency level: 62% (+15%)
Algebra 1: State Proficiency Avg: 47%
Algebra 1: Hamilton High (Memphis) 4% (-43%)


Grade 10:
English 2: (Campbell County) School Proficiency level: 66% (+5%)
English 2: State Proficiency Avg: 61%
English 2: Hamilton High (Memphis) 17% (-44%)

Biology 1: (Campbell County) School Proficiency level: 31% (-18%)
Biology 1: State Proficiency Avg: 49%
Biology 1: Hamilton High (Memphis) 7% (-42%)


Grade 11:
Writing: (Campbell County) School Proficiency level: 94% (+4%)
Writing: State Proficiency Avg: 90%
Writing: Hamilton High (Memphis) 86% (-4%)

U.S. History (Campbell County) School Proficiency level: 100% (+3%)
U.S. History: State Proficiency Avg: 97%
U.S. History: Hamilton High (Memphis) 86% (-9%)

http://www.greatschools.org/modperl/...om..HeaderLink
Hamilton High School Test Scores - Memphis, Tennessee - TN
Those are the school stats for the county... It doesn't indicate what the dropout rate is for the county which is very high. The educational attainment for the county as of 2010 indicates less than 70% of the population has a high school diploma and less than 10% has a four year degree. Those are very bad numbers so any future progress will be extremely incremental. Proficiency tests differ on a state by state basis as well.
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:28 PM
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Location: Ohio
16,825 posts, read 33,229,869 times
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Since the enrollment at the school in the OP was fairly constant, to draw any larger conclusions about the makeup of the city, it matters a lot whether the attendance areas were redrawn. During that span of years, many cities ended school busing for racial balancing purposes.
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Old 11-23-2011, 05:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Those are the school stats for the county...
No. Those are the school stats for the high school found within the county he mentioned. The other stats are for Hamilton High, an inner city high school in Memphis, in the same state, which takes the same criterion assessment tests.

Quote:
It doesn't indicate what the dropout rate is for the county which is very high.
The person to whom I was responding stated that Campbell County Tennessee's educational level was similar to that of an inner city school. I proved him wrong by providing the standardized scores on tests that all students within the state of Tennessee take.

Drop-Out rate isn't the only measure of educational attainment. Test scores are as well.

Quote:
The educational attainment for the county as of 2010 indicates less than 70% of the population has a high school diploma and less than 10% has a four year degree. Those are very bad numbers so any future progress will be extremely incremental. Proficiency tests differ on a state by state basis as well.
You do realize that those numbers take into account senior citizens who never went to school beyond grammar school? It's a common known fact that people of older generations in Appalachia (of which Campbell County is a part) didn't complete school, often to work for the family. Thus, in a true reference of educational performance, you have to look at current high school students and a current graduation rate, not the percentage of people who has a high school diploma, or, to a lesser extent, a four year degree. The latter is very dubious, as many yuppies will live in the Memphis city schools, have children, but then flock to the suburbs. These people have four year degrees, so it drives up the figures, and gives some people the idea that it is the city schools producing such individuals.


Speaking of graduation rates. Anyone who has ever had experience within an urban, inner-city school setting knows that they often socially promote students fearing that failing them will lead to a life of drugs, crime, and prison. Other places are less apt to socially promote beyond the middle school level, but it often continues at the high school level in the inner city. It's why you get people graduating who can't read. Thus, graduation rate really doesn't mean much. You don't know the standard to which each county enforces a pass-fail system within the schools and the districts at large. However, with standardized tests, they are the same criteria on a set of standards that students must show their proficiency. It is a much more accurate system of educational level and quality.

Last edited by Stars&StripesForever; 11-23-2011 at 05:59 AM..
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Old 11-23-2011, 07:08 AM
 
56,678 posts, read 80,995,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
No. Those are the school stats for the high school found within the county he mentioned. The other stats are for Hamilton High, an inner city high school in Memphis, in the same state, which takes the same criterion assessment tests.

The person to whom I was responding stated that Campbell County Tennessee's educational level was similar to that of an inner city school. I proved him wrong by providing the standardized scores on tests that all students within the state of Tennessee take.

Drop-Out rate isn't the only measure of educational attainment. Test scores are as well.

You do realize that those numbers take into account senior citizens who never went to school beyond grammar school? It's a common known fact that people of older generations in Appalachia (of which Campbell County is a part) didn't complete school, often to work for the family. Thus, in a true reference of educational performance, you have to look at current high school students and a current graduation rate, not the percentage of people who has a high school diploma, or, to a lesser extent, a four year degree. The latter is very dubious, as many yuppies will live in the Memphis city schools, have children, but then flock to the suburbs. These people have four year degrees, so it drives up the figures, and gives some people the idea that it is the city schools producing such individuals.


Speaking of graduation rates. Anyone who has ever had experience within an urban, inner-city school setting knows that they often socially promote students fearing that failing them will lead to a life of drugs, crime, and prison. Other places are less apt to socially promote beyond the middle school level, but it often continues at the high school level in the inner city. It's why you get people graduating who can't read. Thus, graduation rate really doesn't mean much. You don't know the standard to which each county enforces a pass-fail system within the schools and the districts at large. However, with standardized tests, they are the same criteria on a set of standards that students must show their proficiency. It is a much more accurate system of educational level and quality.
Unfortunately, this doesn't take into account resources, expectations, family structure/educational history and other factors. Interestingly, the Memphis City SD has one of the best graduation rates for urban school districts in the country and I believe has a rate higher than the national average, which was around 69.2% in 2006 and 68.8% in 2007. http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Educati...-straight-year

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2009/0609/p02s13-usgn.html
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Old 11-23-2011, 07:46 AM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,581,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Unfortunately, this doesn't take into account resources, expectations, family structure/educational history and other factors. Interestingly, the Memphis City SD has one of the best graduation rates for urban school districts in the country and I believe has a rate higher than the national average, which was around 69.2% in 2006 and 68.8% in 2007. Graduation rate for US high-schoolers falls for second straight year - CSMonitor.com

US high school graduation rate climbs to 69.2 percent - CSMonitor.com
Yes, I noted that the graduation rate was rather high for an inner city school district. As stated, it's likely that social promotion is going on in the schools, or what gets one passed in one of these inner city schools is subpar to what will get one promoted in other schools.

By the way, looking at Campbell County Comprehensive High School in rural Appalachia Tennessee, it has 99% of its student population accepted for free or reduced lunch. By contrast, the inner city school is much lower, around 64%, I believe. Yet, Campbell County still vastly outperforms Hamilton High on standardized tests.
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