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Old 05-01-2009, 10:12 AM
 
1,201 posts, read 1,987,485 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterRabbit View Post
Yinz and y'uns is said to be characteristic of Pittsburgh. It might be Appalachan.
in west tn, several of the elderly rural folk, probably born late 1890's to early 1900's, use(d) words such as hisn, youins, theren, yourn, thines, pertnear, yonder, clum, hangged, clam (used to indicate a direction), and hiest. while visiting my grandparents farm in the summers and on holidays, i heard many older farmers use these terms regularly while speaking.
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,947,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingchef View Post
i love this one, thank you jesus!
LOL I'm glad yo ulike that
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Old 05-01-2009, 11:16 AM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,450,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
live oak trees
kudzu vines
cotillion
"dry" counties (& bootleggers!)
languid rivers
the smell of pine tar
the sound of bullfrogs
pecan groves
storytelling
Awww... I like this list. It almost reads like a poem!
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Old 05-01-2009, 11:18 AM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,450,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Let's pause for a big A-MEN, brother!

I will be just a bit more charitable though, my friend. I am sure there are a random few Southerners out there who truly don't care for fried okra. Unfathomable as it might be. I have yet to meet one...but law of averages says it must be so in some isolated and remote quarters! Now, I think a LAW is that one cannot be a true Southerner if they never even heard of it!
You just met one!
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Old 05-01-2009, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh but I'm ready to relocate......
727 posts, read 1,687,183 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
The quintessential Okie here....I can't believe nobody has put down fried okra = the finest vegetable on God's green earth. Growing up in Oklahoma we ate it like popcorn it was so dang good. In my book, you can't call yourself a Southerner if you don't like okra. Alright, j/k.
I personally like my Okra in Seafood Gumbo but I'm not a Southerner
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Old 05-01-2009, 12:47 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,108,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by houstoner View Post
You just met one!
C'mon, Houstoner (and Deacon)...what would y'alls kinfolk think of this? *righteous look of indignation*

BUT...welll, to be fair? Probably the same as mine when I got old enough to flat admit I really didn't care all that much for Pecan pie! Just too damn sweet for me! That was almost heresy for a Texas/Southern boy. Because if anything was ever a constant at our family gatherings other than good stories, it was Pecan Pie.

If I was Catholic I might have had to go to confession over that!
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Old 05-01-2009, 02:35 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,108,570 times
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Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Doing this is supposed to make you wealthy, according to family lore.
My understanding of that cherished Southern custom is that it is for good luck during the New Year...and traces back to the WBTS (although there is interesting history and speculation on that one!). BUT...the "wealth" mention you make is a very important part of the whole tradition. That is, the black-eyed peas are for good luck...while the "greens" (which can range from cabbage to turnip) served with them are for "wealth"!

All I know is ya gotta have cornbread (no sugar) with it all!
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Old 05-01-2009, 06:51 PM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
4,085 posts, read 11,450,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
C'mon, Houstoner (and Deacon)...what would y'alls kinfolk think of this? *righteous look of indignation*

BUT...welll, to be fair? Probably the same as mine when I got old enough to flat admit I really didn't care all that much for Pecan pie! Just too damn sweet for me! That was almost heresy for a Texas/Southern boy. Because if anything was ever a constant at our family gatherings other than good stories, it was Pecan Pie.

If I was Catholic I might have had to go to confession over that!
Well, since you asked, I'm a terrible Southerner. I don't care for pecan pie either! And I'm a bad Texan because I don't really like BBQ! I know, I should have my Southerner/Texan licenses revoked! Truth is, I'm a really finicky eater. My folks understand because I have been all my life.
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Old 05-01-2009, 07:01 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,108,570 times
Reputation: 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by houstoner View Post
Well, since you asked, I'm a terrible Southerner. I don't care for pecan pie either! And I'm a bad Texan because I don't really like BBQ! I know, I should have my Southerner/Texan licenses revoked! Truth is, I'm a really finicky eater. My folks understand because I have been all my life.
LOL I can see an interesting thread starting....and I am will be the one to do it. Gimme a minute...!
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Old 05-01-2009, 10:10 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,412 posts, read 7,704,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingchef View Post
bass&catfish2008: child, i had an aunt---and i was just thinking of the pecan pie recipe two days ago---and she made the best pecan pie i have ever eaten. she used a tad of light brown sugar, besides the white granulated, then she used both light and dark karo---no substitution for karo, please. she added one extra yolk, instead of using the standard two. the thing that distinguished her pies from my grandmother's and my dear mother's pie was not the filling particularly, but rather, the pie shell. all of the women in my family made their own pie shells and cakes. my aunt lyndell made her pieshell and would bake it washed with karo syrup and butter. she would then place the filling in this shell and bake them both to set the pie filling. the next day, when she allowed the pie to be cut, the shell would be saturated through with butter and the syrup from the pie. the best thing that i can relate this to is the desert, baklava. for those of you who eat it, you know the way the honey saturates the phyllo...well the old fashioned pie crust is even better than the phyllo. mercy. i remember to this very moment how wonderful this pie was for sunday dinner. too, i remember many occasions where family and friends alike gathered for a fish fry around our big black cooking kettle. pounds and pounds of catfish fillet, crappie, bass, and brim were fried up golden brown. i wish i had some now. those were happy times not soon forgotten. i am realizing how precious these memories are becoming as i get older. by the way, bass, my maternal grandparents owned a cafe and my grandmother made all of the homemade pies. her specialty was coconut cream w/ meringue. my grandfather always said that it was mile high calves slobber...he wouldn't eat a piece without it.
This is a great post! Yeh, my Grandma (and now my Mom as well) used to make her pecan pie with the light and dark caro syrup too....best stuff to ever go in an Okie's mouth!

Wow, describing that pie crust....you're makin' me hungry! Ya'll sound like you're some expert pie makers in your family...it's also good to know there are still folks out there that know how to make a good cream pie....send some on over, Friend.
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