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Old 04-09-2007, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
29,041 posts, read 45,020,548 times
Reputation: 20425

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Quote:
Originally Posted by keith4gigs View Post
Hi Jhlcomp. Thank you for your help and concern. I had already come across the wiki link. It is incomplete and does not go beyond the state level. What I learned initially is that liquor laws differ greatly within a single state on the county and local level. There are plenty of anomolies, such as 'wet' cities in 'dry' counties and many other variations of the federal/state/local level.

I'm just curious why you would take two seconds to google 'liquor laws by state', paste a link and then act like you went out of your way to prove how proficient you are at conducting research. That is lazy. If you were really going to show how smart you are you would write my whole paper for me, put together a power point presentation, film it and then post it on youtube complete with your self-produced soundtrack of ambient glitch music. Can you have it done by Tuesday?
LOL... and as a reference librarian, I must throw in my distaste for Wikipedia. We don't consider it a credible source, even though it has some good info - but not ALL is good or accurate, which automatically eliminates it from our "bank".

And while I'm at it, the phrase "just Google it" kinda makes my skin crawl... I use Google for plenty of stuff, but it's not the answer to everything. Not to mention, if you aren't knowledgeable about good sources vs. bad ones, it can have dangerous results.
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Old 04-09-2007, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
29,041 posts, read 45,020,548 times
Reputation: 20425
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymous View Post
gizmo, I don't think that's the case. N.O. isn't any different from the rest of the Louisiana. I know that Louisiana was the last state to raise it's minimum age from 18 to 21, and it happened not that long ago. But I wouldn't call it a loophole, I'd call it the federal government strongarming the states for highway money.
I'd have to do some research (not on Wiki ), but that's what my brother told me... he went to Tulane in NO, and said you only had to be 18 to drink. I think it was something like "you can possess but not purchase", which meant they could still drink in a bar - as long as an older person actually handed over the money.
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Old 04-09-2007, 10:07 PM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,865,814 times
Reputation: 1668
wiki is a good starting point, but certainly nothing to be referenced in formal research. The liquor article is but one of many examples of its inaccuracies.
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Old 04-10-2007, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,371 posts, read 59,817,368 times
Reputation: 54016
But the Wikipedia link doesn't say stuff like "Pennsylvania's liquor laws are mired in bureaucracy, entitlement and cronyism."

Pennsylvania operates state stores and tightly controls the flow of liquor and wine. These state stores exist merely so the politicians' dysfunctional in-laws can have high-paying union jobs.

The liquor control board brags that because the state is the largest purchaser of wine in the country, and can command better prices. Why, then, can I buy the same bottle of wine at a Kroger in Ohio for $2 or $3 less?

Beer can be purchased by the case at a beer distributor, and by the six-pack at restaurants, bars, etc. -- again, tightly controlled; again, the prices are much higher than in other states, especially on six-packs.
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Old 04-10-2007, 02:37 PM
 
955 posts, read 3,323,480 times
Reputation: 607
from laborlawtalk.com

In South Dakota, alcoholic beverages are sold in private liquor stores, not state-owned establishments. Liquor stores must have off-premise licenses only, meaning it is illegal to consume alcohol on the property. Unlike many other states, South Dakota doesn’t restrict the days or hours that liquor may be sold, although many municipalities do. (not sold after 2am or Sundays in some municipalities).

South Dakota has a law forbidding open containers of alcohol in motor vehicles. This includes consumption of alcohol by passengers, and re-sealed containers, even re-corked bottles of wine. Any previously opened bottles should be transported in the trunk.

In South Dakota, drivers are considered to be driving under the influence with a blood alcohol content (BAC) above .08. A blood alcohol content over the legal limit is considered sufficient proof of violation in a court of law. Both of these laws are consistent with other states. South Dakota is one of only a few states where the penalty for refusing a breathalyzer test is less than the penalty for driving under the influence. DUI is considered a felony after the third conviction.

The legal drinking age in South Dakota, as in other states, is 21. The minimum age to work as a server in a restaurant that sells alcoholic beverages in South Dakota is 18. The minimum age to work as a bartender in a restaurant or bar is 21. Under South Dakota law, an individual must be 21 to handle, transport or sell spirits in a liquor store or off-premises establishment.

We do have "dry counties" on the reservations but I don't have exact details.

Also found this info on the same web site from above

Mississippi is the only state where it is still legal for a driver to tool down the street while slurping a cold beer. According to Mississippi State Representative Percy Watson, “People feel that as long as you’re not driving under the influence or driving while impaired, you should not be restricted in your consumption of alcohol.”

Seven other states permit passengers to drink from an open container of alcohol, as long as the driver is not imbibing or impaired. These include Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, Missouri, Tennessee, Virginia and Wyoming. Interestingly, with the exception of Alaska, most states that allow open containers rigidly control the sale of alcohol through state stores.

In two states, Arkansas and West Virginia, it is inexplicably legal to have an open container of alcohol in the passenger compartment, as long as no one drinks from it.
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Old 04-10-2007, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Somewhere close to Heber, AR
388 posts, read 1,643,339 times
Reputation: 201
There are 75 counties in AR; more than half are dry;
1. Ashley
2. Benton
3. Boone
4. Bradley
5. Clark
6. Clay
7. Cleburne
8. Columbia
9. Craighead
10. Crawford
11. Faulkner
12. Fulton
13. Grant
14. Hempstead
15. Hot Spring
16. Howard
17. Independence
18. Izard
19. Johnson
20. Lafayette
21. Lawrence
22. Lincoln
23. Little River
24. Lonoke
25. Madison
26. Marion
27. Montgomery
28. Nevada
29. Newton
30. Perry
31. Pike
32. Polk
33. Pope
34. Randolph
35. Saline
36. Scott
37. Searcy
38. Sevier
39. Sharp
40. Stone
41. Van Buren
42. White
43. Yell

I don't live in town, but the closest town is dry; no alcohol sales at all.

My house is wet.
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Old 04-10-2007, 05:48 PM
 
Location: The Bronx
1,587 posts, read 1,263,664 times
Reputation: 277
Default Has anyone heard of this?

I have heard that people have been cited for "open container" because they had cans in the car that they were taking to the store to get their deposit back.

Anyone else hear of this?
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Old 04-10-2007, 10:20 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Default Illinois

Quote:
j33: The wiki link is useful, but there is no real information for Illinois. We are pretty lax on our alcohol laws, but I'm fairly certain we actually have some.
I lived in Illinois some years ago, and here's what I remember from then. It may be different now. Alcohol of all kinds was sold in liquor stores and grocery stores. It could not be sold between 2AM and noon on Sundays. The alcohol aisles were roped off in the grocery stores that were open during those hours. Liquor stores were closed from 2AM Sunday until 12 Noon. There was a law that liquor could not be sold on election day until the polls closed, but I beleive that was changed. As my ex said, people should be in their normal state when they vote, i.e. drunk if they are usually drunk. LOL! I remember once buying a 6 pack of beer at some drive-up establishment on a Sunday.

Drinking age changed while I was there from 21 to 19, then back again to 21. Enforcement of age limits was lax in the bars in Champaign. My ex played in a band before age 21, was allowed to play in the bars.

In re: Wikipedia, I recently read an article that said Wiki is actually pretty accurate. I know that to be true in issues I have researched.
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Old 04-10-2007, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Helena, MT
373 posts, read 1,704,964 times
Reputation: 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
LOL... and as a reference librarian, I must throw in my distaste for Wikipedia. We don't consider it a credible source, even though it has some good info - but not ALL is good or accurate, which automatically eliminates it from our "bank".

And while I'm at it, the phrase "just Google it" kinda makes my skin crawl... I use Google for plenty of stuff, but it's not the answer to everything. Not to mention, if you aren't knowledgeable about good sources vs. bad ones, it can have dangerous results.
Good points. I know we don't let students use Wiki in their bibliographies the college where I teach. I even know of some courses in the world where students will specifically go out and place incorrect info on Wiki just to prove this point as part of their coursework.
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Old 04-11-2007, 04:57 PM
 
Location: The Bronx
1,587 posts, read 1,263,664 times
Reputation: 277
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
LOL... and as a reference librarian, I must throw in my distaste for Wikipedia. We don't consider it a credible source, even though it has some good info - but not ALL is good or accurate, which automatically eliminates it from our "bank".

And while I'm at it, the phrase "just Google it" kinda makes my skin crawl... I use Google for plenty of stuff, but it's not the answer to everything. Not to mention, if you aren't knowledgeable about good sources vs. bad ones, it can have dangerous results.
Right on.

What irritated me/scared me was people I used to meet out West that thought that the Internet would replace the library. Poppycock.

I often say: certain types of depth information, you could be clicking on that thing till next Tuesday, and I'll find the same or better information in a good library in 30 minutes.
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