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Old 04-10-2007, 05:00 PM
 
436 posts, read 539,975 times
Reputation: 243

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A retired college engineering professor (from a large state university) who volunteers at the same non-profit as I, has opined she believes that college degrees aren't worth what they used to be worth just fifteen/twenty years ago, and that too many students with undergraduate degrees are unprepared to enter their chosen fields.
I can't speak to that, but I am bothered by something altogether different involving several colleges (is it more widespread?) - the recent scandals that trusted college officials used their positions to line their pockets. Do you think officials found guilty of steering loans to personally profit from it should see incarceration time along with monetary loss and forced early retirement?

Maybe David Chase (Sopranos creator) could create a new blockbuster HBO pilot revolving around animal house parties, drugs, sex, binge drinking, high-tech exam cheats, parent to teacher payoffs, high cost college SAT prep camps, parents who push their kids for their own self-aggrandizement, corrupt school administrative officials padding their retirement kitties, and sordid faculty misdeeds - on second thought.. no way, to reality based.

Last edited by brian_2; 04-10-2007 at 05:31 PM..
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Old 04-10-2007, 05:04 PM
 
2,356 posts, read 2,734,973 times
Reputation: 864
Which college scandals are you referring to?

Many people share the opinion that academically, college doesn't help you in in a real job. I disagree, and just think that's indicative of how many people don't figure out what they want to be in college.
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Old 04-10-2007, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Missouri
6,046 posts, read 21,943,528 times
Reputation: 5076
I also read about the college loan scandal. I think those who participated should lose their jobs, and the universities they work for should be fined.

I didn't learn how to do my job in college, but I did learn strong writing and problem solving skills.
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Old 04-10-2007, 08:38 PM
Status: "Happy New Year!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
88,633 posts, read 104,981,334 times
Reputation: 34139
I didn't hear about the college loan scandal. I think anyone who is suspected of breaking the law should be prosecuted.

I think a college degree is well worth the money, time, and effort spent on it. You learn skills that are transferrable to many jobs. People change carreers many times over a lifetime of working, why "train" them to do something specific that may be obsolete in a few years?
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Old 04-10-2007, 08:47 PM
 
5,935 posts, read 14,300,550 times
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brian, looks like you're headed down two tracks with this thread. I'll address the second one. From what I've heard, many of the college officials involved haven't technically broken the law. It's a question of ethics. What they've done is steer students/familiies to certain lenders in return for all kinds of trips, perks, gifts, etc. But just because it's not illegal doesn't make it not despicable.
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Old 04-12-2007, 03:52 AM
 
Location: Hell
606 posts, read 550,729 times
Reputation: 85
scandals spread all over the place,colleges cannot be avoided.

by the way,i'm a college student major in engineering,ahh.
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Old 04-12-2007, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Illinois
250 posts, read 874,545 times
Reputation: 163
Whoa! What do you mean college doesn't teach you job skills???? I am a Nursing student and I couldn't get a nursing job without a college degree! I learn everything I need to know from my college courses. Then I will have clinicals to help enhance these learned skills. My degree is very valuable! It is definately money well spent (and it beats working as a waitress as I have for the last 12 years) because in the area that I live in, you don't get a good job unless you have a degree.
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Old 04-12-2007, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Hell
606 posts, read 550,729 times
Reputation: 85
it's very very difficult to find a job without a college degree.
College degree can help you a lot but can't guarantee anything.

JenM,where are you living? Michigan? How's the employment there?
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Old 04-12-2007, 12:19 PM
 
Location: in a house
3,574 posts, read 13,272,054 times
Reputation: 2354
Quote:
Originally Posted by JenM View Post
Whoa! What do you mean college doesn't teach you job skills???? I am a Nursing student and I couldn't get a nursing job without a college degree! I learn everything I need to know from my college courses. Then I will have clinicals to help enhance these learned skills. My degree is very valuable! It is definately money well spent (and it beats working as a waitress as I have for the last 12 years) because in the area that I live in, you don't get a good job unless you have a degree.
Actually, you'll need to pass the N-CLEX and get your license to be able to work as a registered nurse - not the degree. Graduation from a post-secondary institution of higher learning permits you to apply for the licensing exam. Good luck!
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Old 04-12-2007, 04:45 PM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
24 posts, read 125,675 times
Reputation: 17
Yes, here in California I hear about increasing tuitions for students, then I hear about salary raises for the college trustees. Something just doesn't add up. Factor that in with the exorbitant amount of money students spend on textbooks (which are updated with new versions often), and it's sad that the price of a college degree is putting many students in debt.

I think the two years it takes to finish the General Education requirement is somewhat of a waste. I know it's important that we have well-rounded students, but honestly I do not remember much from all the General Ed classes I took. I don't apply that knowledge to my daily life either, so I think those classes could be limited.

I think more emphasis should be placed on writing and computer classes, despite a student's major. Requiring internship is a good idea also, since learning about something via a textbook and actually doing it could be totally different experiences. Plus, when a student graduates, he or she will have obtained some work experience already through those internships. Nowadays I think you can't just get a Bachelor's and expect jobs to come your way easily, especially if your major was broad and not career-specific.
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