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Thread summary:

Value in putting down roots and staying in same location or moving from state to state to chase employment, college graduate, love wide open spaces of Colorado, outdoor activities

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Old 04-12-2007, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,708,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tewhann View Post
"Plus, lots of people move for reasons OTHER than their job. Like me for example. The first post had lots of erroneous assumptions about why people move (ie: most women just spend their lives following their husbands around ), but I just don't have the time to pick through it all.
Of course I know that! I know several guys who are effectively stay-at-home dads and the wife is the "breadwinner." And of course singles in their 20s and 30s relocate often, whether men or women. I made that observation after observing dozens of posts on countless forums here that say, "My hubby just got transferred to," or "I would love to stay here, but hubby's job ..." I think it's funny... who is this infamous "Hubby" everyone keeps lamenting about?
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Old 04-12-2007, 09:43 AM
 
1,229 posts, read 3,153,392 times
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most women just spend their lives following their husbands around

And what is wrong with that?!
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Old 04-12-2007, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,667 posts, read 33,667,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
I know that city-data.com is a forum about relocation, so to ask this question might seem strange: Is there any value in choosing a place to live, putting down roots, and making it a permanent home, as opposed to chasing jobs across the country, always moving around from state to state?
I have lived the last 12 years of my life always with the idea that where I lived wasn't permanent. I rent and I lease my car. I'm divorced no kids. I moved here from another state because of a job advancement, no other reason. I needed a nice safe place to dwell, not live (there's a difference), while I was going to work in both DC and another MD county. I invested zero time in my current town. My friends were connected to my job but they do not live in my town and activities (beyond dining) with them were typically done someplace else in the county, state or even in other states.

The current town doesn't have much of an identity. The place doesn't look any different during the holidays except inside some of the stores. There are no parades or anything that remotely resembles town pride. I think that has a lot to do with me not being the only one who thinks the town is merely a stopping place in their lives and the proximity to Washington DC that overshadows the Maryland suburbs on holiday events and other events. It could also be the community I don't see revolves around the schools. I also think because the town is composed of long time feds, people have a lot of leave accrued and "go home" on major holidays. I even get two sets of the same TV stations (Baltimore and Washington) further obscuring the town's identity.

Now that I've just retired and I'm ready to move 540 miles away to still another state, I realize that I know more about the place I am moving to than where I live now. There are things I know I want to get involved with, do and see in the new place. I've explored it on a visit. I've spent a lot of time researching it. I know more about my future Congressman (what he stands for and his accomplishments) than my current one. I've been reading both the daily and weekly newspaper in my future town for the last 7 months but I don't even watch the local news on TV where I live now, unless there is some major weather event. I watch national news on cable, listen to national syndicated talk radio but I don't read the local newspaper or listen to the local radio stations. There are actually places in the town (it's only 5 square miles) where I live now that I have never been to, like a park just up the road from me. I don't belong to any local organization or clubs although when I lived and grew up in another state (before MD) that was not the case.

There's nothing wrong with where I live now other than that it is a fairly transient government town. People move in and people move out based on job promotions and retirement. It's fairly well-to-do with little crime. It's not too far from DC where most people work. I just never had a lot of interest in becoming involved in the town because I've always felt like I was passing through. Now that I am moving in retirement, 1) I've been reflecting on this (never gave it much thought before) and 2) have no desire to come back here even for a visit. It's not dislike, just apathy. I've invited friends to visit me in my new state even so much to describe what they could do or see but never mentioned coming back here.

I think it's a lot easier to not put down roots when the rest of the town is doing the same thing. I'm ready for something different now. I don't think chasing jobs from state to state is the issue. In retrospect, I think some investment in the community where you live is the issue, no matter how long you are planning to live there.
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Old 04-12-2007, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,708,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Now that I've just retired and I'm ready to move 540 miles away to still another state, I realize that I know more about the place I am moving to than where I live now. There are things I know I want to get involved with, do and see in the new place. I've explored it on a visit. I've spent a lot of time researching it. I know more about my future Congressman (what he stands for and his accomplishments) than my current one. I've been reading both the daily and weekly newspaper in my future town for the last 7 months but I don't even watch the local news on TV where I live now, unless there is some major weather event.
Quote:
There's nothing wrong with where I live now other than that it is a fairly transient government town. People move in and people move out based on job promotions and retirement. It's fairly well-to-do with little crime. It's not too far from DC where most people work. I just never had a lot of interest in becoming involved in the town because I've always felt like I was passing through. Now that I am moving in retirement, 1) I've been reflecting on this (never gave it much thought before)
I've been thinking about my initial post and these responses over the last two days, and just realized something... The people most likely to be involved with their communities in terms of volunteering and local politics are indeed retirees. They also have the time on their hands to be monitoring their local elected officials all day. Of course, in places like here in Arizona you get 100,000's of "snowbirds," who live here in RV's during the winter months and then drive back to their home in Minnesota when it starts getting hot in May.

Also, I think I confused two different issues. 1. "Living where you want"-- of course everybody factors in their climate, recreation, cultural, and geographical preferences along with their career choices. Assuming you're not in the military, no one can FORCE you to live in a place you don't like. And a lot of the cities that have a lot of job growth and opportunities, Denver included, are places that people are moving to in droves anyway, because they happen to be nice places to live and affordable. I think my fear is that some day I'd be fortunate to have a job opportunity too good to turn down, but I'd have to move to a lousy city. Ironically, I'm already living in the worst city in America if you were to listen to the majority of people on the Phoenix forum on this website.

2. "Having roots"-- that whole concept is a myth of course, especially in 21st century America. I think wherever you live, you should take pride in your community, but to expect people to be glued there forever is unrealistic. Except maybe for really small towns (New England, perhaps?), people do not live in the same exact place generation after generation anymore. As another poster remarked, even your hometown city will end up looking like a different place some day. I guess packing up and heading down the highway is part of the American way of life.
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Old 11-09-2007, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,708,587 times
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I wanted to come back to this question, since I read an interesting comment today by the moderator on the San Diego forum:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sassberto View Post
I have to agree with Joe. I work in Tech (web apps mostly) and while I am not underpaid by SD standards, I could either move to LA and make 20% more or move to Portland and have a 30% lower cost-of-living.

That said - tech market is good here - I've never had a problem finding work. jobs paying 100k+ are not exactly plentiful but they are there. A nice side effect of the somewhat transient nature of the city is that once you become an established, local candidate, a lot more opps open up to you.
Do you think this true? For cities that have a lot of transplants moving in and out all the time-- San Diego is like this apparently, Phoenix definitely is, and Denver (where I plan on moving back to next May) is like that too-- does living there long term give any special credibility and/or career advantages that people who are just recent newcomers don't have? What do you think about Sassberto's comment?
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Old 11-09-2007, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,320 posts, read 55,123,408 times
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My parents came to America and bought a house and over the years, instead of moving to a bigger place, they remodeled and extended the home to accomodate their growing family.

As an adult, I thoroughly appreciate that they did that. It really created a sense of belonging for us kids and our house became a home where we felt safe from the rigors of the world.

Now,
we still own that house and my parents finally agreed to move to a smaller house a block away when it became clear that they werent going to able to maintain a 7 bedroom house(LOL) so my sister and her husband and their brood(4 kids) live there now while he's finishing up medical school.

That said,
To each his own. What works for some families doesnt always work out for others. Im just glad we found what we needed.
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Old 11-09-2007, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Orlando
8,178 posts, read 16,542,413 times
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As a child, my family moved approx every three years.....here is the results...

Pros....I've lived in towns of every shapes and sizes, I've learned to expect the unexpected. I've learned how to make the best of situations. I've learned that if I wanted someone to hang with other than my siblings I had to make an effort to go out and meet people....not easy for a shy person.

Cons...no sense of permanence...why bother making deep friendships when you're leaving soon anyway. Who cares about making memories in a house when you're gonna have to leave those behind.

I'm all grown up now and have had to blend both pros and cons to better benefit my life. I've been in my house now for 14 years and to this day and I still wonder when I'm going to pack it all up.

I have no warm fuzzy memories of either my Mother or my Father's house. So I've worked hard to give those to my son.

So, my advise is this...move around when you are young. When you marry and have children find a place to grow you're roots.
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Old 11-09-2007, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,320 posts, read 55,123,408 times
Reputation: 15389
Quote:
Originally Posted by captnemo62 View Post
As a child, my family moved approx every three years.....here is the results...

Pros....I've lived in towns of every shapes and sizes, I've learned to expect the unexpected. I've learned how to make the best of situations. I've learned that if I wanted someone to hang with other than my siblings I had to make an effort to go out and meet people....not easy for a shy person.
Totally Agree. That's probably part of the reason I personally moved all over the world in my 20s. From India to Italy to Brazil to Australia to South Africa and so on. Perhaps subconsciously I was making up for not getting to experience that as a kid. It was a priceless experience.


Quote:
So, my advise is this...move around when you are young. When you marry and have children find a place to grow you're roots.
In a nutshell.
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