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Old 06-04-2009, 06:51 PM
 
81 posts, read 198,017 times
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I think Ohio and Michigan, among other, so called "rust-belt" areas, will see increased population in this twenty-year period. For one, the housing is dirt-cheap in these areas; for 20K you can buy a decent home. Think no real bills. What artistic entrepreneurial type can resist the opportunity/freedom this would bring? I am just saying this will create tremendous opportunities for the right people. Moreover, a strong artsy class builds and insulates our best, most vibrant cities.
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Old 06-04-2009, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
4,852 posts, read 8,989,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
True. A lot of people from Texas always say how we're losing population because apparently tons of people are flocking down south. Well, not enough for us to be losing population
After watching a little bit of last night's special on ABC, NYC would not be desirable since those dams have to be built. The finance industry and the rest of the population will shift to Philadelphia since it's inland like Houston instead of on the coast like Galveston.
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Old 06-04-2009, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,232,834 times
Reputation: 1819
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
After watching a little bit of last night's special on ABC, NYC would not be desirable since those dams have to be built. The finance industry and the rest of the population will shift to Philadelphia since it's inland like Houston instead of on the coast like Galveston.

I really don't think so. I've never heard this before and I watch the news often. Apparently ABC is the only news station that believes this lol.
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Old 06-04-2009, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
4,852 posts, read 8,989,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
I really don't think so. I've never heard this before and I watch the news often. Apparently ABC is the only news station that believes this lol.
Did you watch some of the special last night on ABC's flagship Channel 7? You might want to learn why Texas' great city of Galveston shifted to Houston a century before.
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Old 06-04-2009, 08:12 PM
 
686 posts, read 1,515,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schertz1 View Post
I think Ohio and Michigan, among other, so called "rust-belt" areas, will see increased population in this twenty-year period. For one, the housing is dirt-cheap in these areas; for 20K you can buy a decent home. Think no real bills. What artistic entrepreneurial type can resist the opportunity/freedom this would bring? I am just saying this will create tremendous opportunities for the right people. Moreover, a strong artsy class builds and insulates our best, most vibrant cities.


I doubt there will ever be a rebound in the rustbelt, for a rebound there has to be buisnesses moving there and I just don't see that happening when alot of buisness is going south.
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Old 06-05-2009, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,562,228 times
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My city (Niles, Mich.) is actually forecast to grow over the next 50 years, which is surprising, seeing as how the city's population has been declining since 1980. What's even more surprising is that it's considered its own metro area - it borders South Bend, IN and for all practical purposes is an extension of that city. Locally, the Niles - South Bend area is called "Michiana" or simply the South Bend metro area. I don't know what the U.S. Census Bureau was thinking when they decided to separate Niles from the rest of Michiana; they obviously have never been here. If Niles and South Bend were combined, it would rank as the 102nd largest metro today.
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Old 06-05-2009, 03:31 PM
 
5,969 posts, read 7,741,043 times
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I think the Philadelphia metro will grow more than predicted.
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Old 06-05-2009, 03:33 PM
 
5,969 posts, read 7,741,043 times
Reputation: 1614
Quote:
Originally Posted by schertz1 View Post
I think Ohio and Michigan, among other, so called "rust-belt" areas, will see increased population in this twenty-year period. For one, the housing is dirt-cheap in these areas; for 20K you can buy a decent home. Think no real bills. What artistic entrepreneurial type can resist the opportunity/freedom this would bring? I am just saying this will create tremendous opportunities for the right people. Moreover, a strong artsy class builds and insulates our best, most vibrant cities.
I do agree with this, the rust belt areas will provide alot of opportunities as far as real estate.
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Old 06-05-2009, 05:53 PM
 
3,285 posts, read 5,430,440 times
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If you do the research on some areas you can see that the population projected on that website is different than what it will actually be.

ex Greenville, SC metro had 588,714 residents in 2005 and the projections are saying it will have 710,478 residents in 2025. But if you really look into how many jobs are coming to the area, and it still has not saw it's job, and residential boom yet (which is projected to happen very soon, 2010 or 2011) then you can understand that these numbers are off. There are a few developments in the planning that will have +20,000 jobs (not just one) and jobs bring people so one of those 20,000 job developments can bring 40,000 residents possibly! If you really do the projections yourself, the numbers will be way different than there's because you know more details than the researches do (like the people who made that projection list)...BTW Detroit people I'm sorry but that other nations keep taking your jobs...(The GM is planning to move out of Detroit, Greenville, SC, is trying to get it, and Charlotte is too...I'm not sure who is else is trying to get it)
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Old 06-05-2009, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
1,734 posts, read 5,058,248 times
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GM has no plans to change headquarters and leave the Detroit area. The debate is weather or not they will leave Downtown Detroit and move to one of the suburbs.
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