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Old 06-08-2009, 11:36 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,452,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
If these estimates actually are accurate:

The Bay Area CSA will have 8.447 Million residents by 2025. The state projects 8.297 Million by 2020.

If we add Stockton and Modesto(Not unlikely at this point), it rises to 9.863 Million. Actually this is not far off from the state's own projection of 9.940 Million by 2020.

If we add Salinas(Another big possibility), it rises to 10.297 Million.

Lake and Mendocino are two counties that probably will join the Bay Area too but this link doesnt have their projected populations for 2025.

Sacramento is a stretch for 2025 but if we added Sac, the combined area's population rises to 13.003 Million.

For SoCal, if these estimates are accurate:
The LA CSA will have 20.986 Million-within striking distance of NY.

Is there that much room to move all those people into the metro area?
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Old 06-08-2009, 11:49 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,341 posts, read 55,131,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
Is there that much room to move all those people into the metro area?
As far as The Bay Area, we've only developed 700,000 acres(roughly 1100 square miles) of 4.7 Million total acres(roughly 7000 square miles). 84% of our land mass is undeveloped.

The problem here is not space, but the willingness of locals to build on all the open space.

As far as consolidating with surrounding metros, that's going to depend on how many more people are employed here but live out in the outlying valley counties.
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Old 06-09-2009, 05:04 AM
 
Location: Tampa
3,981 posts, read 9,427,207 times
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I am curious how some of these areas are going to manage the growth.

Where are Dallas, Atlanta, and Phoenix going to get the water from?

How about traffic?
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Old 06-09-2009, 05:05 AM
 
Location: Tampa
3,981 posts, read 9,427,207 times
Reputation: 1171
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
As far as The Bay Area, we've only developed 700,000 acres(roughly 1100 square miles) of 4.7 Million total acres(roughly 7000 square miles). 84% of our land mass is undeveloped.

The problem here is not space, but the willingness of locals to build on all the open space.

As far as consolidating with surrounding metros, that's going to depend on how many more people are employed here but live out in the outlying valley counties.
My understanding is alot of that land is undevelopable. arent there alot of mountains that cant be built on?
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Old 06-09-2009, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,341 posts, read 55,131,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
My understanding is alot of that land is undevelopable. arent there alot of mountains that cant be built on?
SF itself is pretty much built out-but not built up.

The denser shoreline cities along the Bay are pretty much built out.

But scores of the inner ring and outer ring suburbs have plenty of room to grow but refuse to allow development.

This is why you feel like your driving through open fields from one population center to another in much of the suburban areas here.

Marin County for example feels rural even though its right on the other side of the Golden Gate Bridge.
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Old 06-09-2009, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Tampa
3,981 posts, read 9,427,207 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
SF itself is pretty much built out-but not built up.

The denser shoreline cities along the Bay are pretty much built out.

But scores of the inner ring and outer ring suburbs have plenty of room to grow but refuse to allow development.

This is why you feel like your driving through open fields from one population center to another in much of the suburban areas here.

Marin County for example feels rural even though its right on the other side of the Golden Gate Bridge.
you could take some floriduh politicians.

Miami is non stop city/suburb from the keys to west palm beach. 100 miles or so...
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Old 06-10-2009, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Palos Verdes
83 posts, read 248,984 times
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Interesting numbers, but I am sure we would all giggle a bit about them if presented again by 2025. My opinions:


1. Tampa Bay's growth is WAY overstated. You simply cannot suck many more lower middle-class residents out of the Midwest and place them in that nexus of underemployment and housing overcapacity at such a rate for the next 15 years. Stick a fork in the demographics of Florida (except perhaps Pensacola).

2. Phoenix as well - but replace "Midwest" with "people fleeing Southern California" and "New Yorkers who couldn't make it in New York". Oops - that last statement really just applies to Scotsdale, and is not my own.

3. Austin metro will surpass San Antonio metro as predicted - definitely by 2025, if not earlier. It will be interesting to see how San Antonio being Texas' "4th city" will pan out, especially on this forum.

4. Dallas nipping on the heels of Chicago's population? 50/50 shot on that one.

5. Detroit will continue the sad decline and become the Glasgow of America - which means that it will have a fairly good shopping mall built over the ruins of one-time industrial might. And a heroin problem. We are half-way there.
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Old 11-21-2009, 01:17 AM
am2
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
413 posts, read 744,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
bizjournals: Projected population of 250 U.S. metros (http://www.bizjournals.com/specials/pages/257.html - broken link)

think the projection is accurate for your city?

I think Charlotte will have more than 2.6 mil in 2030, more lilke 3 to 3.5. Its still fast growing despite economy
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Old 11-23-2009, 02:39 PM
SWV
 
Location: After College Brooklyn/Bronx/Queens NYC
445 posts, read 1,214,632 times
Reputation: 160
-Rethinking about moving to NYC-
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Old 11-23-2009, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,642 posts, read 7,444,233 times
Reputation: 4315
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuato View Post
Interesting numbers, but I am sure we would all giggle a bit about them if presented again by 2025. My opinions:


1. Tampa Bay's growth is WAY overstated. You simply cannot suck many more lower middle-class residents out of the Midwest and place them in that nexus of underemployment and housing overcapacity at such a rate for the next 15 years. Stick a fork in the demographics of Florida (except perhaps Pensacola).

2. Phoenix as well - but replace "Midwest" with "people fleeing Southern California" and "New Yorkers who couldn't make it in New York". Oops - that last statement really just applies to Scotsdale, and is not my own.

3. Austin metro will surpass San Antonio metro as predicted - definitely by 2025, if not earlier. It will be interesting to see how San Antonio being Texas' "4th city" will pan out, especially on this forum.

4. Dallas nipping on the heels of Chicago's population? 50/50 shot on that one.

5. Detroit will continue the sad decline and become the Glasgow of America - which means that it will have a fairly good shopping mall built over the ruins of one-time industrial might. And a heroin problem. We are half-way there.
NYC isn't appealing to everyone and there are plenty of people who live in Scottsdale among other places who are perfectly happy with their surroundings and not everyone is a "$30,000 millionaire" there. In addition, no one should count their chickens before their hatched (for those of you who are acting pretentious because you live in NYC)...your lives aren't over yet and things can change for you as quickly as they can change for anybody else who "hasn't made it in NYC".
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