U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-06-2009, 01:26 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,894 times
Reputation: 18

Advertisements

Hello, this is my first post although I have been reading around for a while with a view to emigrating although this is looking very very unlikely.

One thing I can understand is how Americans can be dissatisfied with their standard of living.

Compared to the UK the advantages are many with few drawbacks. I know one big thing that is always brought up is the welfare system with free healthcare. Yes this is an advantage but the amount of taxation for this is unjustified IMO.

Some points I have realised:

practically any suburban house is a mansion compared to our surburbia.

Everything is A LOT cheaper in US espacially gas

Although taxes vary from state to state even california's taxes are not on par with ours and the 17.5% (reduced to 15% for a year) sales tax we have drastically increases the prices of all goods.

Also salaries in US dwarf UK ones in like-for-like jobs. (Just looking at the average expected earnings of class of 2009 on MSN made me feel a little light headed)

So with all this money, low taxes, very very cheap property in most states (as a multiple of income and deffinatly when compared to UK), whats the problem?

Maybe its a case taking all this for granted as that's just the standard there.

I dont want this to be seen as an attack on anyone or anything, its just something I wanted to get the opinion of real americans on. (As I intend to stay here a while maybe set up a camp-bed, please dont be offended by this, first impressions count!)

Last edited by greyUK; 06-06-2009 at 02:14 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-06-2009, 02:06 PM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,728,705 times
Reputation: 46028
Hey, you raise some good points. Namely that nobody is ever satisfied.

My brother-in-law hails from Manchester and, no slur on the UK intended, he says he's never moving back. According to him, he lives like a rich man in South Carolina on pay that would be barely getting by in the UK. He still visits and stays connected with family, but SC is where he's putting down roots. It's been interesting to me, because whenever his family comes to visit, they bring empty suitcases and go clothes shopping, because it costs so much more to buy just the basics.

Personally, I live in a nice house, drive a nice car, have three kids, money in the bank, and take two vacations a year. I'm not complaining in the least. I know that I have it good.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2009, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
1,954 posts, read 4,505,168 times
Reputation: 1817
Infrastructure and transportation here is poor compared to much of Europe and we have large urban areas that are in very poor shape. City life is much better and more vibrant in Europe with the exception of a hand full of American cities that are also going to cost you a lot to live in.

You make some good points though. If you are looking for a large house in suburbia you are much better off in the United States.

Basically it comes down to having better public spaces in Europe vs. the better opportunity to have more personal possessions in America.

Last edited by 5Lakes; 06-06-2009 at 02:27 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2009, 02:23 PM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,728,705 times
Reputation: 46028
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5Lakes View Post
Infrastructure and transportation here is poor compared to much of Europe and we have large urban areas that are in very poor shape. City life is much better and more vibrant in Europe with the exception of a hand full of American cities that are also going to cost you a lot to live in.

You make some goods point though. If you are looking for a large house in suburbia you are much better off in the United States.

Basically it come down to having better public spaces in Europe vs. the better opportunity to have more personal possessions in America.
Well, and the opportunity to accumulate wealth. My BIL said flatly that the tax structure in Europe is making it almost impossible for middle-class people to ever enjoy financial independence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2009, 03:28 PM
 
2,502 posts, read 8,049,058 times
Reputation: 885
I heard that in England, even much of the middle class has to pay up to 40% income tax. To me, that's just absolutely ridiculous.

Europe is cool to visit, but I'm happy with living in America. It's easier to live comfortably here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2009, 03:55 PM
 
3,277 posts, read 4,615,176 times
Reputation: 1913
Americans have different priorities. America is the most consuming nation in the world. Sure we save a lot of money by having lower income tax, but that money is spent on things like large houses and fancy cars(in part because any non-car related transport in most cities is horridly under built and underfunded)and private education. And then you factor in the astronomical costs of health care and Higher Education... Meanwhile, Europeans pay higher taxes, have less discretionary income, but have safer cities to live in, better transportation so they are not car dependent, no cost or low cost high education and health benefits, and public schools they can trust their children in.

I think there is a great need for Americans to rethink where our priorities should be. Especially in light of the collapse of our economy due to the ever expanding need to borrow and deregulate to keep consumption up with production.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2009, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington
2,317 posts, read 6,886,668 times
Reputation: 1701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoarfrost View Post
Americans have different priorities. America is the most consuming nation in the world. Sure we save a lot of money by having lower income tax, but that money is spent on things like large houses and fancy cars(in part because any non-car related transport in most cities is horridly under built and underfunded)and private education. And then you factor in the astronomical costs of health care and Higher Education... Meanwhile, Europeans pay higher taxes, have less discretionary income, but have safer cities to live in, better transportation so they are not car dependent, no cost or low cost high education and health benefits, and public schools they can trust their children in.

I think there is a great need for Americans to rethink where our priorities should be. Especially in light of the collapse of our economy due to the ever expanding need to borrow and deregulate to keep consumption up with production.
I would rep you for this if I could.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2009, 04:28 PM
 
11,879 posts, read 32,912,793 times
Reputation: 8626
It's true that even "poor" Americans would be considered pretty well-off in many countries. Consider: poor Americans often have cars, televisions, cell phones, and plenty of food (look at how obese we are).

A rising tide lifts all boats, meaning as our tax structure has allowed people to work hard and accumulate wealth if they so desired, our poorer population has benefitted, too.

I do fear for what's coming since most Americans seem completely oblivious to the dangers of living in a nanny state. A government large enough to give you everything you want is also large enough to take away everything you have.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2009, 04:35 PM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,728,705 times
Reputation: 46028
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
It's true that even "poor" Americans would be considered pretty well-off in many countries. Consider: poor Americans often have cars, televisions, cell phones, and plenty of food (look at how obese we are).

A rising tide lifts all boats, meaning as our tax structure has allowed people to work hard and accumulate wealth if they so desired, our poorer population has benefitted, too.

I do fear for what's coming since most Americans seem completely oblivious to the dangers of living in a nanny state. A government large enough to give you everything you want is also large enough to take away everything you have.
Yep. Anybody who hasn't been to Guatemala or Haiti have zero concept of what true poverty is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2009, 05:39 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 10,792,865 times
Reputation: 4125
Americans complain about taxes and quality of life but I think the true issue is that lack of community and the quality place to raise a family. That and our consumer culture has sapped what little community we had left.

It's time to abandon our selfish desires and force change.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top