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Old 04-12-2007, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,715 posts, read 33,749,623 times
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Most people from out of the area, think of NY by the images and sounds of New York City that they see on TV and in movies. But, there are parts of NY State that look, sound and where people act, nothing like NYC or the people of NYC. They hunt and they fish and they camp and their kids are in the boy scouts. You never see those places on TV on a regular or semi-regular basis unless they are covered with 12 feet of snow.

The people from California are all morally or intellectually challenged...except for everyone else in the state who are in gangs or are saint maids/nannies who don't speak good English raising the kids of too busy parents. Come on, honestly, have you ever seen a TV show or movie where the maid/nanny wasn't one small step from sainthood? Come to think of it, have you ever seen a TV show/movie with a maid/nanny that didn't take place in NYC or Los Angeles?

No one's opinion in flyover country counts. How frequently do you see non-victims like analysts, politicians or subject matter guests with opinions on talk shows or cable news shows that don't come from the East or West Coast? There's a primary coming up in Iowa. Ask yourself, have any of the major news outlets (broadcast or cable) actually asked someoneone from Iowa to come on their shows and analyze what's going on in their state or project what they think the outcome of the primary will be?

There are people making posts on the forums today who are looking to relocate and appear to know everything the do about the South from Deliverance, Dukes of Hazzard, Green Acres, Petticoat Junction, etc.

Would you retire to Florida after all of those Seinfeld episodes with Jerry's parents?

Tell me your impressions (good or bad) of states that you have never been to that have been shaped by Hollywood (TV shows or movies) or the news media.
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Old 04-12-2007, 10:19 AM
 
2,775 posts, read 2,854,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Tell me your impressions (good or bad) of states that you have never been to that have been shaped by Hollywood (TV shows or movies) or the news media.
This thread strikes a cord with me. Before I moved to Indiana, I couldn't even point it out on a map and just perceived it to be one of the "I" states. I thought it would be all farms and farmers.

I moved out here several years ago and learned it isn't much different than many of the other places I've lived. Yes there's more "space" than in NY or Florida, but all the familiar stores/businesses/activities are available. And indeed there are well-educated professionals as well.

The reason your question really struck a cord with me is that since I've been here I've been acutely aware that whenever Hollywood wants to say someone or somewhere is backwoods or from the country, they almost always state Indiana. Where's the wierdo from... Indiana. Where did the rinky dink small town the hero of the program miraculously hail from to become famous/wealthy/successful... Indiana. A strange event happened... Indiana. LOL, it's always the same. I don't know exactly why there's a conspiracy against Indiana in Hollywood, but there definitely appears to be something there.
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Old 04-12-2007, 11:20 AM
 
1,025 posts, read 3,767,453 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post

There are people making posts on the forums today who are looking to relocate and appear to know everything the do about the South from Deliverance, Dukes of Hazzard, Green Acres, Petticoat Junction, etc.
Thank you.

I've been dismayed to see how many people cling to ficticious or outdated perceptions -- about the south, in particular.
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Old 04-12-2007, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Just a few miles outside of St. Louis
1,921 posts, read 5,171,669 times
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Before I moved to Florida, from Wyoming, over 26 years ago, I thought of Florida as being balmy, breezy, and lots of palm and orange trees. We moved to the Panhandle, in the northwest part of of the state, not far from the Alabama state line, and guess what?! This part of Florida is more like Alabama than it is like the rest of Florida. No groves of orange trees, pitiful looking palm trees, (and they're only here because people like to transplant them here. They're not really suited for this area), and the first winter I spent here, I like to froze to death! I wore my down jacket everywhere, even inside. I kept telling my husband to take me back to Wyoming, so I could be warm again! I've been to South Florida, and trust me, it's like night and day.
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Old 04-12-2007, 12:20 PM
 
767 posts, read 2,272,118 times
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I'm from Chicago, which is one of the few cities outside of NYC and LA that gets featured regularly in TV and movies. The biggest stereotype about Chicago that gets perpetuated in the media is the notion that it's a disproportionately "blue collar town" in an industrial city with overweight guys talking about "Da Bears" all of the time while eating deep dish pizza and guzzling beer. Granted, I'm the biggest sports, pizza, and beer fan that you'll ever find, but Chicago has just as high or more of a proportion of white collar professionals than any of the coastal cities along with a spectacular lakefront shoreline, world class cultural institutions, the world's center for architecture, the most live theatre outside of NYC and London, one of the highest concentration of artists in the world, one of the top shopping centers for shopping and fashion anywhere with Michigan Avenue, and visionary restaurants on par with anything in NYC or Europe. Yet, the media always goes back to the image of the simple-minded Chicagoan (Jim Belushi needs to go away) as being representative of the city as opposed to getting the sophisticated label that is accorded to places like NYC, San Francisco, and Boston.

It wouldn't bother me so much other than people who visit Chicago from out-of-town are almost always shocked at how beautiful and upscale the city is (particularly with comments about the lake that being so big that they can't see the other side as opposed to the pond that they were obviously expecting) because the media perpetuates the image that it's a land-locked industrial Midwestern Rust Belt town.

Other than complaints about the weather (which can definitely suck), I have yet to meet someone that likes urban atmospheres (I'm not talking about the people who only like small towns) that isn't blown away by what Chicago has to offer. I just wish that the national and international perception of Chicago would be that highly regarded in the way with how people seem to have a romanticized vision of San Francisco even if they've never been there.
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Old 04-12-2007, 12:47 PM
 
1,486 posts, read 4,031,347 times
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Frank-

I think Chicago is an interesting situation. I originally grew up in Texas (you want to talk about media stereotypes ) but soon moved to the East Coast after college. I spent most of my time up there and became very enamored with the urban, neighborhood, public transit, walkable lifestyle that the major cities on the East Coast offered. But I have to be honest, I have only been to Chicago once in my life. I am sure I would like it there, but it just didn't have the draw to me that the East Coast had. Maybe it is more of a Midwestern thing; not sure. I know this is a stereotype, but it just always seemed to me that the Midwest was dying, where the big cities on the East Coast were vibrant and alive. I know that is a HUGE stereotype and I am sure a huge misconception, but I have to be honest that is how I felt (and even still do a little).

Now I live out in Phoenix (a place I hate btw and probably has the opposite problem) and there are tons of people out here from Chicago. Most of the people who were like me, i.e. moved from Chicago (the city not the burbs) because of the housing costs and the weather thinking that Phoenix was the new Eden are itching to get back! Hopefully in the near future I can spend some more time there. I have always wanted to see a Cubs game. In the meantime, I am off to Boston in May.
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Old 04-12-2007, 01:09 PM
 
767 posts, read 2,272,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irwin View Post
Frank-

I think Chicago is an interesting situation. I originally grew up in Texas (you want to talk about media stereotypes ) but soon moved to the East Coast after college. I spent most of my time up there and became very enamored with the urban, neighborhood, public transit, walkable lifestyle that the major cities on the East Coast offered. But I have to be honest, I have only been to Chicago once in my life. I am sure I would like it there, but it just didn't have the draw to me that the East Coast had. Maybe it is more of a Midwestern thing; not sure. I know this is a stereotype, but it just always seemed to me that the Midwest was dying, where the big cities on the East Coast were vibrant and alive. I know that is a HUGE stereotype and I am sure a huge misconception, but I have to be honest that is how I felt (and even still do a little).

Now I live out in Phoenix (a place I hate btw and probably has the opposite problem) and there are tons of people out here from Chicago. Most of the people who were like me, i.e. moved from Chicago (the city not the burbs) because of the housing costs and the weather thinking that Phoenix was the new Eden are itching to get back! Hopefully in the near future I can spend some more time there. I have always wanted to see a Cubs game. In the meantime, I am off to Boston in May.
Irwin,

I'm not surprised that's been your impression - you're confirming exactly what I was talking about. I can understand the fascination with New York - it's a world center on so many different levels. Yet, with the media bias in this country, other coastal cities such as Boston get a reputation as being more exciting. While I think Beantown is a beautiful town, there's no way that it's a more vibrant urban atmosphere than Chicago. I definitely think the negative (or at least boring/simple/family values/industrial) perception of the Midwest does drag down Chicago's perception overall. Often, Chicago gets lumped in with places like Detroit and St. Louis because of geography, even though by every social metric (economy, diversity, educational institutions, wealth, urban vibrancy, politics, culture), Chicago has a lot more in common with the coastal cities. I'll say this as a libertarian Republican - Illinois is as blue of a state as anywhere in the country (whether that's a good or bad thing is a different debate that ought to be avoided here) unlike its Midwestern neighbors.

By the way, in terms of a walkable urban environment with distinct neighborhoods plus comprehensive public transit, Chicago is second to none. Be sure to visit some time - like I said, if you love cities, I can't imagine you not loving Chicago!
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Old 04-12-2007, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Toledo
3,861 posts, read 7,605,774 times
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I guess I'm one of the few people outside of the northeast that differentiates between the NYC area and the rest of NY. I personally think the south gets the worst media portrayal.
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Old 04-12-2007, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Chattanooga TN
2,349 posts, read 9,683,041 times
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I feel that the south (TN/GA/AL/VA/KY) gets one heck of a rep, partly due to the media. Even local stations here will pick the biggest, dumbest hick with the fewest teeth that they can find to give a personal perspective on any given story. "Wheelllll, me un my paw were down at thuh store gettin some tar to fix thuh chimley (yes, chimley) and we wuza wonderin whut all that racket was over yonder. I'll be derned if it weren't that there train had run offah thuh tracks." Plus you throw in some major movies and there you have the "stereotypical" southerner. Sure, we've got that type and every other type you can imagine here. But I can say we don't all live in tar-paper shacks and "do" our daddies.
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Old 04-12-2007, 03:35 PM
 
134 posts, read 401,879 times
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So true! I know lots of people that move to the Huntsville, AL area from all over, and some are amazed that we have running water, wear shoes, and live pretty much like everyone else.

My current job is taking me all over the US. Something I realized is that once you leave the urban areas of any state, you can run into the many stereotypes people have of southerners, but its the southerners that are stereotyped the most, and usually in the most negative way.
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