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Old 06-11-2009, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
1,305 posts, read 3,093,283 times
Reputation: 1180

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevbomac05 View Post
ya im gonna get my ged but i find simple things in life great

im not into material things

i recommend you read the 7 spiritual laws to success
I went the "simple" way for a while. I did what I loved versus what could make money. I dreaded the idea of selling-out. I loathed the concept. I looked at all those people wearing suits who woke up at 7 in the morning five days a week as mindless fools. I laughed at how they spent all day Monday and Tuesday looking forward to Friday, only to do chores over the weekend. I laughed. I scoffed. I spent a good deal of time seeing the world on the cheap. It was a beautiful thing. But, now I am one of those fools. I wear a tie and am awake at 7 in the morning. You may ask why, and the answer is simple. Throughout life, you grow, and as much as you're probably tired of hearing it, your priorities change. What's important to you at 17 won't even register to you when you're 30. It's true. You may find it disheartening, but it's true.

My advice to you is this: Complete school, both high school and college. That way, when you do wake up in the morning and you find that your expectations out of life are no longer aligned with your youthful idealism, you'll be prepared for it. Personally, I recommend you squander your twenties on a beach in Costa Rica. There's no need to rush adulthood. But realize, there will come a time in your life when you do long for a bit more security than you did at age 17. If you're anything like me, you'll fight it a few years, but you'll inevitably give in to it. It's natural. It's primal.

I'm willing to bet if someone were to ask you what you wanted to do with your life, you wouldn't have a concrete answer. Not many people do at your age. Get yourself a liberal arts education that can be transferred into just about any line of work in the future (excepting skill driven positions like doctors and engineers). Having a degree and being slightly prepared for the future won't necessarily detract from any ability to achieve spiritual enlightenment. If anything, it'll open a few more doors that wouldn't otherwise be an option. Raw talent has rarely ever been enough to get anybody anywhere other than in the movies. Do yourself a favor, pretend you're a boy scout and Be Prepared.
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Old 06-11-2009, 12:11 PM
 
16 posts, read 28,339 times
Reputation: 13
texasthekid thats a great post

ya i know i might not feel like i do now, when im 30

anyways your talking about Costa Rica, sounds like fun could you tell me more about how you lived your life and traveled
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Old 06-11-2009, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
1,305 posts, read 3,093,283 times
Reputation: 1180
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevbomac05 View Post
texasthekid thats a great post

ya i know i might not feel like i do now, when im 30

anyways your talking about Costa Rica, sounds like fun could you tell me more about how you lived your life and traveled
I would, but not here. Those stories belong to me, not City-Data. I will tell you this though, a backpack, a thumb, a willingness to take on a ton of credit card debt and an unwillingness to reflexively say no to new experiences will take you a long way.
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Old 06-11-2009, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Springfield VA
4,037 posts, read 8,079,978 times
Reputation: 1499
I would say that Las Vegas is a good spot. Lots of restaurants and casinos to work in. But with the current economy I'm not so sure but yeah lots of success stories from folks who started out as busboys and then worked their way to waiters making $40K a year.
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Old 06-11-2009, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM - Summerlin, NV
3,436 posts, read 5,983,917 times
Reputation: 682
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevbomac05 View Post
ya im gonna get my ged but i find simple things in life great

im not into material things

i recommend you read the 7 spiritual laws to success

Spiritual Laws?!?, Screw that.. thats not going to get you far in life.
I hated high school and I still finished, I even went to one of the worst high schools in my state.. I forced my self to stay in High School.. becuase I did.. I know make $15,000+ more a year on top of having a bachelors degree and the career I chose. That probably wasnt the smartest move and sorry dude, but chances are slim in getting a good job with out a diploma from High School, we are in a "ever changing society" you will be luck if you can.. go to college at least.

Dont plan to ever make over $130,000 a year with out a diploma.
Thats the way I thought, I changed my ways and now i'm making that kind of money.
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Old 06-11-2009, 02:45 PM
 
6,046 posts, read 10,050,459 times
Reputation: 2334
What was the highest grade you completed? You're young enough that you might have time to go back to high school. As long as you would graduate before you're 21, they should let you back in. I think what the OP needs is someone like me (his own age) telling him he should finish high school. I would also recommend going to college. You said you're smart, so find a subject you like and major in it. You will be able to live a better life overall if you go to college and get a job making more money than you would without a degree. You could even go to a technical school if you want somewhere cheaper and shorter than a 4 year college. Even if you don't care about money, would you be happy at a minimum wage job (not the money aspect, but the actual work)? I don't understand how you would live life to the fullest while working a minimum wage job you hate.
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Old 06-11-2009, 02:46 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,456,522 times
Reputation: 2125
well seeing how New Mexico,Georgia and Nevada have the lowest graduation rates I would say one of these 3, but then again all the jobs might be already taken by the non-graduates so it could be tough maybe.
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Old 06-11-2009, 02:50 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,456,522 times
Reputation: 2125
hey we are all gonna die anyways, could be tomorrow so might as well live life up, we cant take a degree or money to heaven.
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Old 06-11-2009, 02:57 PM
 
6,046 posts, read 10,050,459 times
Reputation: 2334
I was trying to say how would he have a chance to live it up if he has to spend all his time working just to barely make enough money (because you do need a certain amount of money just to live unless you're content with being homeless)
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Old 06-11-2009, 04:10 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,966,872 times
Reputation: 6679
When I was born my parents chose to go into poverty because it was the only way they could get the programs needed for my disability.

There was much bad about that, but there was in fact some good. They made their own furniture, enjoyed the mountain scenery, listened to music really loud without anyone caring, spent time with us. They had four kids before me, but despite my disability they were able to really be there for all of us.

I'm not saying "go be poor, live on minimum wage" as it was also good to get out of that. Still if you are sincere, and know what you're getting into, a life of relative poverty isn't always bad. However my parents also knew people who went to the mountains full of unrealistic ideas and they hated it.

So if you want to voluntarily live a life of simplicity and poverty, which well-educated people can do see Thomas Merton, you should understand what this means and whether you can handle it. It's not going to be simply a romantic joyride. You will face limited options in what you eat and how you entertain yourself. If you bore easily you are not going to like it. If you want to have a big impact on the world at large than you're probably not going to like it. If you are very concerned with your appearance or your teeth than it might not be for you. If you can't improvise, cook, or are just bad with your hands than I would suggest not doing it.

If you are truly and sincerely willing to make the sacrifices in order to become more compassionate or connected to nature or God or something than I think that's great. However it's not easy and it's generally not something to be done on a whim. For many I think they are spiritually better to have money, and give generously, than to try for a poverty that makes them bitter or uncharitable.
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