U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Old 06-14-2009, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Stumptown
2,220 posts, read 4,250,572 times
Reputation: 1446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
My Aunt went to Belgium and was shocked at the lax church-attendance of the land of her ancestors. It made her wonder just what was wrong with Belgium to foster that. I don't know if any Belgian answered her.


Quote:
Originally Posted by aidxen View Post
Thats true.
My contact was with professionals (Engineers, Scientists, Business people, and of course lawyers) and they all worked huge hours.

Interestingly, I was talking to a canadian the other day here in Aus and they said that in Canada, if you are a mother and you work part time that you are seen as a bit of a looser. In Australia, job sharing is quite common.

What is the go in America?

I am not talking working in McDonalds here. These are professional and semi professional positions like teachers, accountants, office managers, accounnts receivable / payable person, secretaries, sales people, public servants.
I can totally see this, although "loser" is a bit of an overstatement probably. North Americans tend to be workaholics. Sure, a professional who becomes a mother should have some maternity leave, but then it's the norm to go back full-steam afterwards.

For better or for worse, it's probably a bit looked down upon.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-14-2009, 09:52 PM
Status: "Corn well over knee high!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
67,297 posts, read 54,882,833 times
Reputation: 18705
Having been a working mom for most of the past 24 years, I'd say it's not looked down upon in my profession (nursing), but it's definitely not the way to get ahead on the job. Many hospitals, dr's offices, etc run essentially on part-time help.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2009, 01:21 AM
 
1,202 posts, read 2,199,010 times
Reputation: 527
I was at first shocked that most public infrastructure in US look old and not well maintained. Many buildings are grey and they don't paint the side and back. Potholes and cracks are common on the road and they don't seem to have the interest to fix them. Also there is no automatic reporting of the stations on most buses and some subways. Back home we regard US the greatest country in the world so I thought everything should be clean and perfect, and technologically advanced. I gradually learned that my expectations were just too high for the real world.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2009, 04:40 AM
ako
 
Location: Hopefully not here.
140 posts, read 205,530 times
Reputation: 43
How everything in the US is so expensive. But it may actually be that everything here in Taiwan is so cheap. I was a lot more shocked by how expensive things were in European countries.

But I don't think that the US looks old and is badly maintained. The US is a LOT cleaner than many other countries. Potholes and cracks in the road? You should see Taiwan.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2009, 04:48 AM
 
44 posts, read 49,257 times
Reputation: 60
you want to compare Taiwan and the USA?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2009, 05:00 AM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
13,859 posts, read 12,570,518 times
Reputation: 6435
It depends on where in the US you are on that. For a variety of reasons, size and history, the USA is fairly uneven. Loma Linda, California has among the highest life expectancies in the world and I believe Japanese Americans in California live as long as the Japanese of Japan. However at Pine Ridge Reservation or the poorest parts of Mississippi life expectancy is similar to Haiti or Guatemala. Palo Alto, California is highly educated, but there are towns in California itself made up of extremely poor/uneducated Hispanic farm worker types. America has wealthy large towns like Greenwich, Connecticut and poor large towns like Monroe, Louisiana. Dirt roads and space ships, sometimes in the same state.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2009, 08:48 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
4,964 posts, read 5,815,117 times
Reputation: 4010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
It depends on where in the US you are on that. For a variety of reasons, size and history, the USA is fairly uneven. Loma Linda, California has among the highest life expectancies in the world and I believe Japanese Americans in California live as long as the Japanese of Japan. However at Pine Ridge Reservation or the poorest parts of Mississippi life expectancy is similar to Haiti or Guatemala. Palo Alto, California is highly educated, but there are towns in California itself made up of extremely poor/uneducated Hispanic farm worker types. America has wealthy large towns like Greenwich, Connecticut and poor large towns like Monroe, Louisiana. Dirt roads and space ships, sometimes in the same state.

This is an excellent point.

The USA has a very low taxation rate and if you took out even half our enormous military budget then you'd have one of the lowest taxation rates in the industrialized world. Personally, for the amount our citizens are taxed, I think we're doing pretty good.

As for variety, heck, even within the same metro area of some cities the roads and quality of life differs. Take for instance the Rainier Valley of Seattle vs. Bellevue, a nearby suburb. Bellevue has immaculate streets, the public bus system is next to godliness, and there are shops and wonderful parks. Rainier Valley has gangs and drugs and run down looking places, and the roads are pot-holey.

A lot of it has to do with income gap. A lot also has to do with public order. Some suburbs and nice neighborhoods in cities have citizens who care about the public good and very few cases of neglect or trashing public property happen. In some areas, especially poorer areas, the people could not care any less and don't care what you think about them spitting tobacco juice on the sidewalk, or ripping apart a phone booth, or urinating in subways.

For better or worse, we're a nation of contrasts. Advanced technologically, yet poor education (except university). Great cities, poor cities. And yes, dirt roads and spaceships all in one state at times (e.g. Texas and Florida).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2009, 09:43 PM
 
44 posts, read 49,257 times
Reputation: 60
This is because america is a class society ...

Desperate poor people don´t loose all their pride in their hearts, but they don´t care much about civil duties and aesthetics. It doesn´t manner if they´re living in a self- made shack (maybe this is even better for their pride and responsibility), a housing project or a run down rural wooden house, it doens´t matter if their living room is big or small.

It all depends on social integration

As Individuals they are to blame, because everybody is responsible for his life, but structurally the elites and the highr classes in general are to blame, because they want to make money with cheap employees, outsourcing, avoiding and stigmatization the underclass and try to keep and enlarge their privileges and luxury.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2009, 10:17 PM
 
1,446 posts, read 2,247,239 times
Reputation: 863
GermanCiticen...America is a class society? America has always prided itself on being classless. We have no history of an aristocracy and most Americans are the descendants of poor immigrants. Yes, there is more divisions in American society, I am really concerned about the shrinking middle class. However, looking at the big picture, this certainly isn't someplace like Saudi Arabia or an extremely corrupt African country.

The issue of social integration...I fear much of this deals with issues of culture and race. Take the divisions in Washington DC. We can see the ethnic divisions most clearly between the haves and have-nots in this city. I shouldn't have to say more but I am afraid we are seeing social status on racial lines (with many exceptions of course). The correlation between higher socio-economic status and ethnicity is too great to ignore. But that leaves me with the question...Is this a racial issue or a class issue or both? How should we diffine these divisions. (Sorry if I am being too indirect, but it can be a touchy subject)

Fashionguy...First, it may appear that our infrastructure is deteriorating. Yes, many areas do have an unsatisfactory infrastructure system in this country. Compared to Japan or places in Western Europe it does appear that way. However, I have also traveled to a couple of countries in Africa that have almost a complete lack of any paved roads what-so-ever. I noticed a few paved roads in many cities...that's it. Most are dirt. Therefore, we need to put into perspective where our infrastructure is by international standards. I should say our infrastructure is "well developed" but not "very well-developed." Like others have said before, these standards vary by community. I live in a well-off exosuburb in which our infrastructure is quite good. However in other areas, I know it could be better. Buildings 100 years old are often falling apart, our passenger rail service is not impressive, too much graaffiti exists even in nice areas, etc. I believe too much is spent on the best infrastructure for our armed forces...but this is only part of the problem. Much of the rest has to do with the "excluded from mainstream" communities feelings of isolation from the rest of the country. (I will not debate why this is, just that it doesn't help with civic responsibility).

Backdrifter...You said that Americans tend to be workaholics...true, but only for the adults. There was a good recent article on how much schooling and homework our youths have versus our European counter-parts...You may want to look into the effects of this (just a suggestion).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2009, 10:18 PM
 
1,446 posts, read 2,247,239 times
Reputation: 863
Sorry, I have been busy lately. However, as the OP I have been reading the responses and I enjoyed many of them. I will now be able to respond more often.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $79,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top