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Old 06-19-2009, 08:34 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 10,792,865 times
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The quality of the health care. All my friends who are foreign remark that they've never seen nor been treated as well ever before. Only my Japanese friends have said that the service they received in the US was on par with the service in Japan, but even then, sometimes you have to wait for service there.

A friend of mine in Canada wishes she lived in the USA so that she can get the care she requires for her pinched nerves from a car wreck she had as a teen. She could apply to have stem cells from her good spine areas injected into the bad and clinical trials on others have shown remarkable improvement.
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Old 06-19-2009, 11:09 PM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,286,267 times
Reputation: 20413
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
It didn't sound that bad a law to me either, but is it that they can't have other kids at all or that they can't without an adult present? A teen driving her injured mother, and members of her soccer team, to the hospital sounds potentially okay by me. Well probably, might depend on other factors.
At one time I hosted an exchange student and he was able to get a CA Drivers License valid for 4 years... he used his CA Driver's License until it expired back in his home country in Europe...

Anyway... here's a few highlights on new restrictions.

Effective January 1, 2006, persons under age 18 must be accompanied by a parent/guardian or other person specified by law when:

Transporting passengers under 20 years of age, at any time for the first twelve months.

Driving between the hours of 11:00 PM and 5:00 AM for the first twelve months

Are there any other exceptions to the restrictions?

A. Medical necessity when reasonable transportation facilities are inadequate. You must carry a signed statement from your doctor stating the diagnosis and the probable date the necessity will end.

Schooling or school-authorized activities when reasonable transportation facilities are inadequate. You must carry a statement signed by the school principal, dean or a staff person authorized by the principal or dean, indicating when the schooling or school-authorized activity will be completed.

Necessity of family member including yourself, when adequate transportation facilities are unavailable and you need personal transportation or to transport a family member. You must carry a signed statement by a parent/legal guardian verifying the reason you must drive and the probable date the necessity will end.

Emancipated minor If you have filed documents with DMV to show you are emancipated and have filed either an SR-1P or SR 22 as required by law, you are not held to the provisional driving restrictions. It may be a good idea to carry proof of your emancipated status with you.

Q. Can I drive in the event of an emergency even though my provisional license is restricted?

A. The law does not provide for emergencies; only for exceptions as listed in Vehicle Code Section 12814.6. It is the discretion of law enforcement to determine if they will cite you for violating your provisional license restrictions.


Some of my foreign visitors have commented the above is much more restrictive than there home countries...
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Old 06-21-2009, 09:42 PM
 
44 posts, read 69,588 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by BergenCountyJohnny View Post
Most of my foreign visitors are astonished at the quality and quantity of food for the money in eateries. Overall, most are astonished at the value they get their for their money here, but mostly with food, I think mainly because we have so much more variety and it is very good with low costs. Of course, I hear this mostly in NY, Orlando, and Las Vegas where one can eat very well for very little.

My brother used to go to the UK a lot and he said that after seeing what they pay and what they get in return he can understand why they go nuts with food here. Particularly sandwiches, which, according to my bro, are much more expensive there and the bread is nothing good and they put like a slice of meat and/or cheese on it and that's it.
Well northern european people - ESPECIALLSY UK - arenīt famous for tasty and various foods and famous for its high living costs

I bet that most people outside the UK donīt like the britsh food at all and their wonder about the high costs for everything ...

So donīt think that the UK represents the european average kitchen and costs

During my UK- visits I got the impression, that the life quality in the UK for low incomers is worse than in Germany, more houses are run down, living space is even smaller (allthough itīs rather small here too), costs are very high . But things might be different, correct me if your experience is different.
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Old 06-21-2009, 11:32 PM
 
3,277 posts, read 4,615,176 times
Reputation: 1913
Quote:
Originally Posted by BergenCountyJohnny View Post
Most of my foreign visitors are astonished at the quality and quantity of food for the money in eateries. Overall, most are astonished at the value they get their for their money here, but mostly with food, I think mainly because we have so much more variety and it is very good with low costs. Of course, I hear this mostly in NY, Orlando, and Las Vegas where one can eat very well for very little.

My brother used to go to the UK a lot and he said that after seeing what they pay and what they get in return he can understand why they go nuts with food here. Particularly sandwiches, which, according to my bro, are much more expensive there and the bread is nothing good and they put like a slice of meat and/or cheese on it and that's it.
That's funny. I'd say the food we eat is one of the main detriments to America.
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Old 06-22-2009, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Boston
1,125 posts, read 4,103,252 times
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so many americans are fat, lazy and ignorant. thats what i get reminded of every time I come home from Europe. At least boston is not as bad as some other areas of the country.
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Old 06-22-2009, 02:52 PM
CBB
 
Location: Munich + FL, 32082
481 posts, read 2,042,072 times
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I'm not really SHOCKED about anything in the U.S. - which I love and spend a month in each year.

1) The really OBESE people: those who can't walk anymore - you don't see them here.
2) The obsession about lawns: we think it's crazy to water and fertilize a lawn constantly even if the climate calls for something else.
3) We own a little home in a charming beach community in Florida and were stunned to learn that a lot of weapons were stolen from our community (by the same person). Nobody I personally know owns a weapon.
4) Slums sit right next to wealthy neighborhoods.
5) Inner U.S. cities are run down while they are the most expensive neighborhoods in our towns.
6) Order your Coke WITHOUT ICE unless you want a terribly tasting cloridic beverage.

Other than that I enjoy being in the U.S. for one month a year and don't find it too different or "shocking". But then, we've been there so often.
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Old 06-22-2009, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Vermont
1,475 posts, read 3,670,581 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
It's a mix. America does have a higher murder rate than Western or Central Europe. (Several Eastern European nations are more murderous)

However there are states in the Northern Plains or New England that aren't any more murderous than Sweden. Like the Dakotas, Minnesota, Vermont, Maine, and a few others (Going by the UN's stats and the World Almanac. Although Norway is less murderous than any US state) My guess would be though that if you watch local news in Minnesota or Portland or whatever you see "a lot" of murder because local news here tends to play that up. Especially in areas where maybe not much else is going on.
In America you have a better chance of being involved in a major crime, although you're chances are very slim if you stay out of ghettos. In Europe, you are more likely to be involved in minor petty crimes like pickpocketing or auto smash and grabs.
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Old 06-22-2009, 08:31 PM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,372,703 times
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I know when I go to Europe for 5 weeks or so and come back the very first thing I notice isn't just "fat" people. There are overweight people in the USA as well as Europe (obviously more here), but the one thing that catches my eye are the morbidly obese people in the USA. It's kinda shocking after you go weeks on end not seeing something like that. Obviously there are a LOT of skinny/normal weight people in the USA, but I've just never seen the level of HUGE people anywhere else.

It's very disheartening to see people trying to walk down the street and carry on their lives when they're so large they can barely move or breath normally on their own.
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Old 06-22-2009, 08:38 PM
 
3,597 posts, read 7,705,848 times
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I'm an American expat who's been living abroad for a few years, and prior to that has traveled extensively... Albeit for work more so than pleasure.

Americans have perfected the art of being very friendly on the surface, which I think is extremely strange to foreigners. They then expect Americans to genuinely extend friendship, whereas for us it's just a social behavior that makes public interaction more pleasant.

The size of things. Americans are used to crossing large distances every single day as if it were a matter of course. So many Americans have at least an hour long commute-- it's very common. Here in Sao Paulo, it's unthinkable. In Europe, it just wouldn't happen.

It's so much more acceptable in America to just be in your own space. This is something that I discover over and over again. We really live in our own little world on a daily basis. We tune out with headphones, books, newspapers and the way we walk. Especially the way we walk. As a woman who came here I was told that I walked like a man, even though in the US I've since mastered the art of walking in stilettos. You truly can tell Americans by how we walk-- it's our space, wherever we are, and you'd damn well better not get in my way.

People in other countries, especially in Asia and South America, are terrified of working for Americans. To a lesser extent, it's also true in Europe. We're stereotyped as hyper-productive worker drones that will kill ourselves and anyone else until whatever we want done is done. They treat us like an alien species they've only heard about in newspapers and television shows. My colleagues here tell me that their families prayed for them when they found out they'd be working for an American woman... and then promptly wanted to know what I looked like, as if I'm going to look any different from them

I was lucky enough to have an admin when I came here, and when the copier broke one of the first days she had a nervous breakdown. I had no idea what happened-- of the languages I speak, Portuguese is not one of them-- and when I tried to find out why there was so much paper all over the place she went into hysterics. As if I'm going to kill someone for a technical error I just helped her clean up the paper and rearrange as much as we could. It's irritating to everyone involved, but really? I'm still working on getting her to fear less and work more

Back to work ethic. There is no one more productive than American workers. We agonize over how good we are at our jobs. Work just rules our lives. We're the most driven people on the planet, overall. For whatever reason, good or bad, we're willing to give up almost everything for work. My colleagues here ask me, "How can you stand to be away from your family?"

Which is another point. I don't really talk to my family, and I haven't for over a decade. They could never understand this-- family is so much more important here than it is back in the states. We think nothing of moving far away. That just doesn't happen here.

There are also other differences here that I'm more or less comfortable with. Men catcall you on the streets, which previously I'd attributed to construction workers in Doris Day movies. Although I suppose it's meant to be a form of compliment.

On the whole, people here and elsewhere are much more "wholesome" than we Americans. We're probably the most jaded, over-sexed, over-hyped and burned out people on the planet. We've seen it, been there and done that. I and many of my fellow Americans here are surrounded by gorgeous natural scenery, and we honestly are only just discovering it. Rain forest? Fine, whatever. Waterfalls and canyons and mountains? Yes, yes, gorgeous, but where's my coffee? I had to learn the hard way to put the wonder back in life.
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Old 06-22-2009, 08:48 PM
 
Location: NE Florida
9,362 posts, read 22,801,560 times
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My aunt had a friend visit from Sweden and in the grocery store remarked about the large selection of feminine hygiene products.
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