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Old 03-19-2011, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Weymouth, The South
786 posts, read 1,603,217 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oregonian88 View Post
About what Ramses said, in my experience it's true that when I live abroad, people are much more into being well-groomed and the standards are different enough that even well-groomed by American standards will be seen as near-homeless attire in some places. I don't really like it when people are negative about it either way, like Europeans who think Americans are being dirty or rude by dressing the way they do and Americans thinking that Europeans are snobs or unmanly for dressing the way they do... neither is the case, it's just different cultures with different styles.

On a side note, can someone explain to me why mullets are still in fashion and seem to be a permanent staple in Russia?
I hate when people try and say a whole country, or in fact, in the case of the ever popularly mentioned 'Europe', and entire continent, has just one style, or one way. It's ludicrous.

Also, do they have mullets, or is that just russians in american crime shows? I honestly don't know.

Last edited by BruceTenmile; 03-19-2011 at 05:22 PM..
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Old 03-19-2011, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Boston
1,432 posts, read 3,348,913 times
Reputation: 780
I'm French but have been here for quite a while...

One of the most shocking things was how cheap things are...especially restaurants, gas, and clothes.

Because of that the amount of waste is also shocking. People rarely finish all their food in restaurants, drive a mile to the store instead of walking, and throw away things that could be saved or reused.

Tons of Ice in soda is weird too because it already comes out of the fountain cold and I feel ice is really just a way for places to give less soda for the money. Freshly Brewed Iced Tea, however, is a unique American concoction where ice serves a nice purpose.

Mega sized cups of watery coffee...

The amount of power that individual states have that often surpasses Federal law

Lack of concern for wasted electricity and water...mostly due to the cheap cost.
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Old 03-20-2011, 01:52 AM
 
61 posts, read 52,880 times
Reputation: 69
This Thread So Far:

40% Shocked! at the amount of fat, lazy, geographically illiterate (insert generic stereotype) Americans there are!

40% Shocked! at the amount of fat, lazy geographically illiterate (etc) Americans there were not!

...

20% interesting, if flawed by design, generalizations about wealth, social mobility (or decreasing lack of), and sweatpants!!

Dear God THE SWEATPANTS!!!




Other than that ...and a quick reference to the old, somewhat contentious documentary 'The Listening Project'
http://www.snagfilms.com/films/title...ening_project/ ... it's been a fun thread. Can't wait for more.

================================================== ==================

P.S. That 'shocking' picture no one could figure out? The one with the lady and the shorts?
I think it was people-crossing-the-street-against-the-light.




Last edited by KeepTheDog; 03-20-2011 at 02:05 AM.. Reason: Added link to documentary 'The Listening Project'.
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Old 03-20-2011, 10:07 AM
 
1,085 posts, read 2,111,215 times
Reputation: 1189
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepTheDog View Post
Dear God THE SWEATPANTS!!!
It's funny to me that people keep talking about sweatpants in public because, where I live, I rarely see people out and about in sweatpants. And, it would strike me as odd if I did with any frequency. Is that a non-New England kind of thing?
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Old 03-20-2011, 11:10 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,807,465 times
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I know I posted on this thread already but I have something to add. I think that visitors to America are surprised that their interactions with locals are much more pleasant than they are when Americans visit their countries.
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Old 03-20-2011, 11:15 AM
 
1,085 posts, read 2,111,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
I know I posted on this thread already but I have something to add. I think that visitors to America are surprised that their interactions with locals are much more pleasant than they are when Americans visit their countries.
I've heard that before too. But then, I don't find Americans to be particular more or less out of place than anyone else abroad - the loud, ugly American is really a caricature, as far as I'm concerned. For example, when I lived in NYC, I could spot the German and French tourists a mile away, with their scared bunny looks (yes, it's a generalization, before anyone jumps on me).

The thing I always have found most funny, BTW, is that - when I'm in France - Italians always ask me directions. I don't know what it means, but it is a repeatable phenomenon, so I guess it must mean something!
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Old 03-20-2011, 11:17 AM
 
1,085 posts, read 2,111,215 times
Reputation: 1189
Double post.
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Old 03-20-2011, 01:44 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,512 posts, read 17,740,343 times
Reputation: 30801
<I am in a coffeeshop> I was about to say 'I never see people in sweatpants'. Then I just saw someone in sweatpants. She also appears to be wearing fuzzy bedroom slippers. Granted it is Sunday, pre-evening. I just find it lazy and tacky.

Then again, I am often accused of dressing 'like a lumberjack'. I attribute that to the fact that my European ancestors were all forest workers/fishermen who drank from steams with hand-carved cups that attached to their belts, not namby-pamby office workers who cried when their fingernails broke. :-)
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Old 03-20-2011, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Edmond, OK
4,036 posts, read 9,197,997 times
Reputation: 4180
We had 2 German exchange students who lived with us for about a month, a few years ago. I think the thing that surprised them the most was how spread out it was here. They told us they thought that Americans were silly and wasteful for having so many cars until they visited here. When they realized that in this region of the country, everything is so spread out that it would be almost impossible to live without cars, they changed their minds.
The other thing that really shocked them was WalMart. They were from a very small village in southern Germany, and one of the places they requested to see as soon as they arrived was WalMart. We spent 3 hours roaming the isles of a Super WalMart one Sunday afternoon. They just could not get over all the selection, or the idea that you could buy tires put on your car, ammo for your guns, new shoes and food for dinner all in one store.
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Old 03-20-2011, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Boston
1,432 posts, read 3,348,913 times
Reputation: 780
Quote:
Originally Posted by debzkidz View Post
The other thing that really shocked them was WalMart. They were from a very small village in southern Germany, and one of the places they requested to see as soon as they arrived was WalMart. We spent 3 hours roaming the isles of a Super WalMart one Sunday afternoon. They just could not get over all the selection, or the idea that you could buy tires put on your car, ammo for your guns, new shoes and food for dinner all in one store.
I'm surprised by that because in France the superstore idea is very commonplace and has been around a long time...maybe even longer than the walmart supercenter. I would have assumed that Germany was the same but I guess not. I actually find that Americans are shocked to learn that France has these types of stores.
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