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Old 04-02-2011, 01:48 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,529 posts, read 17,760,841 times
Reputation: 30873

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marius Pontmercy View Post
My friend who is French found Philadelphia to be somewhat similar to some Dutch and English cities,
Philly, like NYC, has a lot of neighborhoods with Georgian (early 18th - mid 19th century) and Dutch influence in the architecture. So I can see what your friend saw.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marius Pontmercy View Post
but he says our panhandlers and homeless, as well as our thieves and pickpockets are way more in-your-face and scary whereas in Europe they're much sneakier.
This is a fundamental social difference in the street life between the U.S. and most of Europe.

When I was young, there were pick-pockets and con-men in NYC, especially train stations and similar places. Today, if someone wants your money, they are more likely, if not a simple beggar, to intimidate the money out of you rather than trick you out of it or use the skills of the pickpocket.
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Old 04-02-2011, 01:55 PM
 
75 posts, read 97,602 times
Reputation: 45
LOL, AMERICA HAS NO CULTURE. Unless you consider McDonalds & Coca Cola apart of America's culture. Here's something funny. We all know the Japanese, Mexican, etc people have depth of culture, take a look at this:
Japanese Culture
Mexican Culture
BUT, when you google American Culture, you get THIS. Keep scrolling to see the McDonald's logo LOL
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Old 04-02-2011, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
2,037 posts, read 4,559,773 times
Reputation: 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banana Child View Post
LOL, AMERICA HAS NO CULTURE. Unless you consider McDonalds & Coca Cola apart of America's culture. Here's something funny. We all know the Japanese, Mexican, etc people have depth of culture, take a look at this:
Japanese Culture
Mexican Culture
BUT, when you google American Culture, you get THIS. Keep scrolling to see the McDonald's logo LOL
not quite:
louisiana culture - Google Search
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Old 04-03-2011, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Canackistan
746 posts, read 1,491,276 times
Reputation: 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcNZ View Post
I'm from New Zealand, but spent a couple of years in the US when I was younger and am in the process of trying to move back (fingers crossed).

I'm sure this could be a long list if I really thought about it, but here are just some that spring to mind now.

Positive shocks:
-How few stereotypical "loud Americans" there actually are. The overwhelming majority of people I met in the USA are warm and friendly, and completely different to the image those of us from outside the states often have. Sure, the US has it's fair share of idiots, but no more and no less than anywhere else.
-That I never saw a gun other than those carried by the police.

Negative shocks:
-That so many people I met were surprised to learn that countries other than the US or Britain speak English as a first language.
-That some people could name the capital of every state, but had almost no concept of where other countries in the world are. (This one may not be completely fair really, when you grow up in a little country like NZ, you have to be more outward looking than you probably need to be in the US)
I agree with your post for the most part. Most Americans are far from the stereotype. I have only met a few "loud obnoius" people in my time down south. I also agree with how some people are clueless about other countries. I have actually met people that do not know where Canada is, and have never heard of it.
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Old 04-03-2011, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,165 posts, read 54,646,759 times
Reputation: 66610
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcNZ View Post
I'm from New Zealand, but spent a couple of years in the US when I was younger and am in the process of trying to move back (fingers crossed).

I'm sure this could be a long list if I really thought about it, but here are just some that spring to mind now.

Positive shocks:
-How few stereotypical "loud Americans" there actually are. The overwhelming majority of people I met in the USA are warm and friendly, and completely different to the image those of us from outside the states often have. Sure, the US has it's fair share of idiots, but no more and no less than anywhere else.
-That I never saw a gun other than those carried by the police.

Negative shocks:
-That so many people I met were surprised to learn that countries other than the US or Britain speak English as a first language.
-That some people could name the capital of every state, but had almost no concept of where other countries in the world are. (This one may not be completely fair really, when you grow up in a little country like NZ, you have to be more outward looking than you probably need to be in the US)
That's kind of embarrassing to hear.
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Old 04-03-2011, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
2,037 posts, read 4,559,773 times
Reputation: 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_gateway View Post
I agree with your post for the most part. Most Americans are far from the stereotype. I have only met a few "loud obnoius" people in my time down south. I also agree with how some people are clueless about other countries. I have actually met people that do not know where Canada is, and have never heard of it.
well for what its worth, I got bored one day and memorized the location of every major country in the world, so I wont be adding to the ignorance. Mostly I did it because when I read or hear about a news article, I want to know exactly where its occurring and which areas will be affected. It takes a lot of the mystery and uncertainty out of world news.
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Old 05-23-2011, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Paradise CA, that place on fire
752 posts, read 439,719 times
Reputation: 2030
When I arrived in Florida, after living in Europe during my first 28 years, I spent the afternoon on the beach in Sarasota. Just before dinnertime I returned to my cousin's house, and he asked me how I like it so far. I told him this is the most fabulous place I've ever seen in my life, but the people are strange.
"What do you mean?" he asked.
I said, "They must be all gay. When I walk by they all say HI."
He laughed, "They aren't gay, just friendly."
It was highly unusual to me. In the huge cities I came from only the closest neighbors say hello. But after a week I became used to it and started to say HI to all.
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Old 05-24-2011, 12:40 AM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,982,118 times
Reputation: 6687
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banana Child View Post
LOL, AMERICA HAS NO CULTURE. Unless you consider McDonalds & Coca Cola apart of America's culture. Here's something funny. We all know the Japanese, Mexican, etc people have depth of culture, take a look at this:
Japanese Culture
Mexican Culture
BUT, when you google American Culture, you get THIS. Keep scrolling to see the McDonald's logo LOL
I'm not really that pro-American, but America does have culture. When I Googled "American culture" the first thing I got was Wikipedia's "Culture of the United States page." Not far below that was the following.

American Culture

The US is the home or origin of bluegrass and jazz as well as, I believe, boogie-woogie and early rock-and-roll. In the arts we've had the Hudson River School, Ashcan School, and Harlem Renaissance. The US has produced some of the most respected film directors like Orson Welles, John Ford, Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, From what I recall of Pew studies American culture does have distinctive tendencies, being more optimistic than most and about the most likely to believe that "a person's success or failure is their own doing."

Granted the US's cultural history is short compared to Mexico or Japan, but it's not non-existent.

Note: I'm aware this is a troll, but what the heck?
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Old 05-28-2011, 10:35 AM
 
3,703 posts, read 4,274,851 times
Reputation: 2234
Quote:
Originally Posted by sliverbox View Post
I would buy that a little. I believe people that live in major metros- particularly in the city cores- are a bit more vain. Its sort of the same out here in Cali. Leave San Francisco and head out towards say- Sacramento, or the inner empire and people tend to drive big honkin' trucks and be a bit fatter. Same was true when I lived around Nashville: People in the city itself- especially those involved with the music biz- were more fit and trim. Leave the city and wallah... fatter people.

I don't understand why obesity seems to be such a noticeable problem in the South. Its not the traditional regional cuisine. Both of my Grandparents ate a lot of fried food,butter soaked vegetables, and bacon. But they were skinny people. I grew up eating the same stuff. I'm also pretty skinny. So are all of my relatives. In fact- I'm only in my 30's and don't recall people being particularly large when I was a kid. Its only been more recently that this trend seems to have occurred.
Well, people tended to do more physical labor and recreation back in then. For instance, I am now chubbier that I work full-time than when I was unemployed. The reason? I work a (very crappy) desk job that basically tethers me to my desk. While when I was unemployed, I would usually pace back and forth a lot (not as creepy as it sounds) out of bored.

Also, people tended to live a bit closer to work, schools, stores, restaurants, and so on. You occasionally got to do this odd thing called "walking" as a mode of transportation. Now, with cul-de-sacs in suburbs, zoning laws that prohibit non-residential activities for sometimes dozens of square miles, and roads that are built for cars (and only cars), it is extremely hard to actually walk to places.
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Old 05-28-2011, 10:50 AM
 
3,703 posts, read 4,274,851 times
Reputation: 2234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hendu View Post
This is a great point. When my father-in-law last visited a few years ago, he went into a cafe and refused to accept coffee served in a paper cup. Finally the manager got involved and they gave him a proper coffee cup. His complaint wasn't about the waste of resources, but about cheapening the experience of sitting in a cafe and drinking coffee.

Other things I often hear about: How much cheaper electronics, cars and gas are than in Europe. The huge portions in restaurants. Despite stereotypes that the US is a rich country, there's a large amount of visible poverty, and the roads and transportation networks here are in poor condition. Also, the amount of tipping that is considered normal, and the types of services where a tip is expected.
When an American did that type of thing overseas, you hear a lot of complaining about how Americans think that there way is right and they make a big stink when they don't get it.
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