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Old 06-25-2009, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
8,619 posts, read 8,523,848 times
Reputation: 5175

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoarfrost View Post
My point was that people who have not been to these places and don't live in the Midwest cannot tell the difference at face. Whereas pretty much anyone knows what makes New York or San Francisco or New Orleans unique.


And that is what ? That they are elitist snobs who think they can force the beliefs on people who only want to left alone to live their lives as they see fit????
P.S. Lived in SJCA longer then I have lived in MN

 
Old 06-25-2009, 05:56 PM
 
3,277 posts, read 4,613,607 times
Reputation: 1913
Quote:
Originally Posted by my54ford View Post
[/b]And that is what ? That they are elitist snobs who think they can force the beliefs on people who only want to left alone to live their lives as they see fit????
P.S. Lived in SJCA longer then I have lived in MN
But how do you really feel about them.
 
Old 06-27-2009, 01:20 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,899,356 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toxic Toast View Post
It is pretty common for states to advertise regional tourism. In Indiana, we get Michigan, Illinois, Ohio, Kentucky, and Missouri. At Circle Center Mall in downtown Indianapolis, Louisville has a tourism kiosk.

When I lived in Kentucky, it was the same thing. Indiana, Missouri, Tennessee, Ohio, Illinois, and West Virginia all ran tourism ads.
Tourism ads don't make a region though. Kentucky, Tennessee, and West Virginia are all Southern states culturally and in terms of speech patterns.
 
Old 06-27-2009, 01:24 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,899,356 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
How does that saying about Pennsylvania go again? Oh that's right, it's "Philadelphia and Pittsburgh with Alabama in between." Pennsylvania has just as many conservative rural areas as your average Upper Midwest state. Only the urban areas are going to be more liberal, just as they would be in the Upper Midwest.
Pennsylvania is NOT the Upper Midwest or the Midwest, if that is what you are trying to argue. It is a Northeastern state, more specifically the Mid-Atlantic. It has the most in common with New York, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. The Upper Midwest is Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota...you could also add in Northern Illinois, Northern Indiana, and Northern Ohio. Philadelphia is not a Midwestern city..neither is Pittsburgh. Both feel and culturally are Northeastern.
 
Old 06-27-2009, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Sanford, FL
598 posts, read 1,520,967 times
Reputation: 295
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Pennsylvania is NOT the Upper Midwest or the Midwest, if that is what you are trying to argue. It is a Northeastern state, more specifically the Mid-Atlantic. It has the most in common with New York, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. The Upper Midwest is Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota...you could also add in Northern Illinois, Northern Indiana, and Northern Ohio. Philadelphia is not a Midwestern city..neither is Pittsburgh. Both feel and culturally are Northeastern.
Not sure where you get that from.

Pittsburgh is not anywhere near an east coast/mid-atlantic city....more like Columbus or Cleveland. Not that it's a bad thing, just a completely different vibe.
 
Old 06-27-2009, 08:43 PM
 
Location: IN
20,845 posts, read 35,927,262 times
Reputation: 13282
Pittsburgh is the largest city in the Appalachian region.
 
Old 06-28-2009, 07:52 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,899,356 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by niceguy19125 View Post
Not sure where you get that from.

Pittsburgh is not anywhere near an east coast/mid-atlantic city....more like Columbus or Cleveland. Not that it's a bad thing, just a completely different vibe.
I will say that Pittsburgh has Midwestern influences, however the landscape and feel of it give it a more Northeastern feeling similar to Erie and Buffalo. It feels somewhat like Cleveland and Columbus, but it does not feel like a Midwestern city, not to me at least.
 
Old 06-28-2009, 10:29 AM
 
Location: IN
20,845 posts, read 35,927,262 times
Reputation: 13282
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I will say that Pittsburgh has Midwestern influences, however the landscape and feel of it give it a more Northeastern feeling similar to Erie and Buffalo. It feels somewhat like Cleveland and Columbus, but it does not feel like a Midwestern city, not to me at least.
Pittsburgh is definitely Appalachian overall IMO. All of the areas that surround Pittsburgh are Appalachian that share common traits including: topography, landscape, culture, and demographics.
 
Old 06-28-2009, 11:19 AM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
821 posts, read 1,253,307 times
Reputation: 754
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Pittsburgh is definitely Appalachian overall IMO. All of the areas that surround Pittsburgh are Appalachian that share common traits including: topography, landscape, culture, and demographics.
I agree with that. I live outside of Pittsburgh and southwestern PA is a part of Appalachia. In fact, I would venture to say that 2/3 of PA is Appalachian. Of course they don't have southern accents, but Appalachian doesn't necessarily mean southern.

When people think of the Appalachians, the states below the M-D line come to mind, but Pennsylvania and the states north of there to New England are part of the Appalachian chain and have some Appalachian influence.
 
Old 06-28-2009, 12:03 PM
 
2,092 posts, read 5,867,791 times
Reputation: 918
Quote:
Originally Posted by niceguy19125 View Post
Not sure where you get that from.

Pittsburgh is not anywhere near an east coast/mid-atlantic city....more like Columbus or Cleveland. Not that it's a bad thing, just a completely different vibe.
And to me, I don't find Columbus and Cleveland that alike. Columbus is pretty midwestern in it's look and charm. Architecturally, Cleveland has an east coast/mid-atlantic feel.
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