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Old 06-29-2009, 03:55 PM
 
Location: IN
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I love the orchards that are common in MI and WI. Rural Door County has so many wonderful local orchards with great produce.

 
Old 06-29-2009, 04:01 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toxic Toast View Post
Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota............. they ALL have rural farmland, not just Indiana.
You forgot Missouri as well. The Northern half Missouri is all rural farmland as well. Btw, for mountains I forgot to include the Appalachian foothills of Ohio. Especially just south of Cleveland, beginning in Chagrin Falls...those hills are incredibly tall and steep. Northern Minnesota and Northern Wisconsin are also very hilly and forested...they actually are not great for crops. Not to mention, Indiana is not all rural farmland...it has numerous state parks that are pretty hilly and cliffy from what I've heard. Illinois I know has many of these.
 
Old 06-29-2009, 04:06 PM
 
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They say Missouri has surprisingly good wine.
 
Old 06-29-2009, 04:08 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I love the orchards that are common in MI and WI. Rural Door County has so many wonderful local orchards with great produce.
Much of St. Louis County was once agricultural too....lots of corn, wheat, soybeans, and apple orchards were grown here, and you can still find farmland along the rivers today. South County was once ripe farmland. Sadly, urbanization in this county has severely limited agricultural farming to the flood plains, although the plus side of this is that as long as there is no flooding this is the most fertile soil in the county. The entire area west of Interstate 270 was almost all farmland/cropland before it was developed, not to mention much of Forest Park and I'm certain much of the rest of St. Louis County (outside of the Ozark foothills)...Webster Groves in particular was known for its apple orchards. Cleveland I believe was also big on apple orchards. another thing the Midwest is big on is its wineries. This particular true in areas where the soil quality is too poor for most crops. I know that Michigan and Missouri in particular are HUGE wine states...at one time all of the Midwestern states were the biggest producers of wine behind California.
 
Old 06-29-2009, 04:09 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonnieJonez View Post
They say Missouri has surprisingly good wine.
Yep...at one time we were the number 1 state in the country for wine...or number 2, I'm not sure if we were ever ahead of California. The Missouri Rhineland (along the Missouri River), and much of the Ozarks are huge on wine. You can even see vineyards along Interstate 44 as you approach Rolla from the west.
 
Old 06-29-2009, 04:14 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
I disagree. Everything you said is pretty dependent on where you are in the region. The Metroparks in Ohio (aka the Valley), rolling Appalachian hills in South east Ohio. There are so many beautiful parts of Michigan I don't even know where to begin.... I don't know, my feelings are most people haven't been to most of the midwest, only isolated areas where they get their impressions from. That OR they drove through a region and assumed to much. Northeast Ohio in general is pretty hilly as well..


Well I am entitled to my own opinion, and having lived in Washington DC and NYC for some extended time, I find more similarities to those areas then say anywhere in the midwest outside of Chicago or Detroit. Even the commercial architecture boom was similar to NYC and Chicago in design an layout of the region. I guess my nostalgia is that of cities like Shaker Heights, Cleveland Heights, and Lakewood - all inner ring suburbs of Cleveland.
History of Cleveland's Skyscrapers - by Frank Gerlak, AICP
My relatives happen to live in Beachwood and South Euclid, rigiht around those suburbs...they feel pretty darn Midwestern to me. Those parts of Cleveland feel no different from Chicago, Milwaukee, Detroit...they even feel pretty similar to Indy, and Columbus, and parts of St. Louis.
 
Old 06-29-2009, 04:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
My relatives happen to live in Beachwood and South Euclid, rigiht around those suburbs...they feel pretty darn Midwestern to me. Those parts of Cleveland feel no different from Chicago, Milwaukee, Detroit...they even feel pretty similar to Indy, and Columbus, and parts of St. Louis.
Beachwood is the quintessential 'cookie-cutter' area. I absolutely despise the architecture in that area. As with South Euclid - it's just ugly. Visit Shaker Heights, University Heights, Cleveland Heights, Lakewood, or Rocky River to understand the architectural influences of the East coast and Chicago. And I just can't agree that any of the cities I listed are similar to Indy... all listed are over 6,000 people per square mile - densely populated. Columbus is rather spread out with 'newly' developed areas mostly dominated by the cookie-cutter homes.
 
Old 06-30-2009, 12:31 PM
 
Location: St. Joseph Area
6,237 posts, read 8,461,586 times
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Quote:
Originally posted by GraniteStater
I love the orchards that are common in MI and WI. Rural Door County has so many wonderful local orchards with great produce.
Ahh, the orchards. We have so many in Michigan, especially along the West Coast. I'll miss them when I'm gone. But then, I actually like farmland. There's a peaceful, wide-open-space feel to it.
 
Old 06-30-2009, 02:33 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
Beachwood is the quintessential 'cookie-cutter' area. I absolutely despise the architecture in that area. As with South Euclid - it's just ugly. Visit Shaker Heights, University Heights, Cleveland Heights, Lakewood, or Rocky River to understand the architectural influences of the East coast and Chicago. And I just can't agree that any of the cities I listed are similar to Indy... all listed are over 6,000 people per square mile - densely populated. Columbus is rather spread out with 'newly' developed areas mostly dominated by the cookie-cutter homes.
I take that as a personal insult. If you are calling my family and where they live trash, then I guess this argument is over since you've just indicated you're exactly what you're calling them. You dismiss anything that could even call your own validity into question by attacking it, and you aim at the minimal differences between places to categorize them. And as far as dense population, that is the most ridiculous way to compare regions i've ever heard of. No two cities sprawl the same, regardless of which region they are in. They FEEL similar to Indy...culturally, in terms of landscape, etc, though moreso to Chicago or Detroit. If you want to put down my family and the places they live in to try and win this argument, you must be getting desperate. The layouts of those cities are different you are right...but the last time I checked, how a city is laid out and how it developed and sprawled isn't necessarily a characteristic of what region a place belongs. Cleveland and Detroit are both laid out fairly similarly. Not to mention, Cleveland was a much bigger and more important manufacturing center than either Indianapolis or Columbus.The latter two cities grew more slowly than the major manufacturing centers like Milwaukee, St. Louis, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and Cincinnati. They also had no means of transporting things by water like the other cities I mentioned...their locations away from large bodies of water likely are a significant reason for them being laid out differently. Culturally, however, there is little difference. This argument is over...you're a waste of my time and energy.
 
Old 06-30-2009, 06:55 PM
 
2,094 posts, read 5,868,453 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I take that as a personal insult. If you are calling my family and where they live trash, then I guess this argument is over since you've just indicated you're exactly what you're calling them. You dismiss anything that could even call your own validity into question by attacking it, and you aim at the minimal differences between places to categorize them. And as far as dense population, that is the most ridiculous way to compare regions i've ever heard of. No two cities sprawl the same, regardless of which region they are in. They FEEL similar to Indy...culturally, in terms of landscape, etc, though moreso to Chicago or Detroit. If you want to put down my family and the places they live in to try and win this argument, you must be getting desperate. The layouts of those cities are different you are right...but the last time I checked, how a city is laid out and how it developed and sprawled isn't necessarily a characteristic of what region a place belongs. Cleveland and Detroit are both laid out fairly similarly. Not to mention, Cleveland was a much bigger and more important manufacturing center than either Indianapolis or Columbus.The latter two cities grew more slowly than the major manufacturing centers like Milwaukee, St. Louis, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and Cincinnati. They also had no means of transporting things by water like the other cities I mentioned...their locations away from large bodies of water likely are a significant reason for them being laid out differently. Culturally, however, there is little difference. This argument is over...you're a waste of my time and energy.
Take it as an insult if you must, I said I simply don't LIKE those areas. Many people think Beachwood is beautiful with all those new homes and high-class retail shops. If you think I meant those two areas are trashy, you obviously haven't been there. Beachwood is ANYTHING but trashy. And I'm not really sure what you are talking about Cleveland being culturally similar to Indy. It's just not true. Cleveland is more culturally balanced (more blacks, hispanics).

Also, Indy is 2000 people per square mile. That is VERY low. Almost every suburb in Cuyahoga County (Cleveland) is more than that.. actually EVERY city might be. It's just spread out much, much, much more than Cleveland. If you are going to compare Indy to any city in Ohio, it would be Columbus. I won't take much more time elaborating but again, city data even has a lot of information on diversity, culture, etc.. I dare you to find ONE area in the Indy area with over 6,000 people per square mile... There are MANY in the Cleveland area.

My argument was that Lakewood, Shaker Heights, University Hts, Cleveland Heights, etc all share similarities to BOTH Chicago and NYC. This is heavily note and known widely by architectures. There are many websites that support this... it takes a simple google search or reading my old posts to find. Cleveland: Shaker Square - Part 2 There are some shots of Shaker. Check this post out while you're at it: http://www.city-data.com/forum/9518646-post33.html


But please save me the time if you are going to play the victim role and act all defensive because I don't like the looks of Beachwood and South Euclid. It's pathetic and embarrassing.
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