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Old 07-01-2009, 01:25 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,899,356 times
Reputation: 660

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
Take it as an insult if you must, I said I simply don't LIKE those areas. Many people think Beachwood is beautiful with all those new homes and high-class retail shops. If you think I meant those two areas are trashy, you obviously haven't been there. Beachwood is ANYTHING but trashy. And I'm not really sure what you are talking about Cleveland being culturally similar to Indy. It's just not true. Cleveland is more culturally balanced (more blacks, hispanics).

Also, Indy is 2000 people per square mile. That is VERY low. Almost every suburb in Cuyahoga County (Cleveland) is more than that.. actually EVERY city might be. It's just spread out much, much, much more than Cleveland. If you are going to compare Indy to any city in Ohio, it would be Columbus. I won't take much more time elaborating but again, city data even has a lot of information on diversity, culture, etc.. I dare you to find ONE area in the Indy area with over 6,000 people per square mile... There are MANY in the Cleveland area.

My argument was that Lakewood, Shaker Heights, University Hts, Cleveland Heights, etc all share similarities to BOTH Chicago and NYC. This is heavily note and known widely by architectures. There are many websites that support this... it takes a simple google search or reading my old posts to find. Cleveland: Shaker Square - Part 2 There are some shots of Shaker. Check this post out while you're at it: http://www.city-data.com/forum/9518646-post33.html


But please save me the time if you are going to play the victim role and act all defensive because I don't like the looks of Beachwood and South Euclid. It's pathetic and embarrassing.
I have been visiting those two areas ever since I can remember for over 20 years...in no way do either of those places resemble NYC. They resemble Chicago far more than NYC, and I have been to the Chicago suburbs MANY times. As far as pathetic and embarrassing, you're the one that made the insinuations, so what was I supposed to think? You blow off any suggestion I make that could counter your opinion and say stuff arbitrarily. As far as embarrassing, you let me be the judge of that. And what was I supposed to think...you happen to like every part of Cleveland except the two areas I bring up...gee, somebody must be afraid of admitting they might be wrong. I don't care whether you like them or not...what I do care about is you thinking your opinion of them coincides with the truth...it doesn't, not in the least. I happen to really like both of these areas, and I know what you say about them is totally false, as I'm sure many of the residents there would agree. This a waste of time and space. Think what you want, just don't think you're right.

 
Old 07-01-2009, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Miami
888 posts, read 650,870 times
Reputation: 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I have been visiting those two areas ever since I can remember for over 20 years...in no way do either of those places resemble NYC. They resemble Chicago far more than NYC, and I have been to the Chicago suburbs MANY times. As far as pathetic and embarrassing, you're the one that made the insinuations, so what was I supposed to think? You blow off any suggestion I make that could counter your opinion and say stuff arbitrarily. As far as embarrassing, you let me be the judge of that. And what was I supposed to think...you happen to like every part of Cleveland except the two areas I bring up...gee, somebody must be afraid of admitting they might be wrong. I don't care whether you like them or not...what I do care about is you thinking your opinion of them coincides with the truth...it doesn't, not in the least. I happen to really like both of these areas, and I know what you say about them is totally false, as I'm sure many of the residents there would agree. This a waste of time and space. Think what you want, just don't think you're right.
I would have to agree with ajf on this one. I've been to those neighborhoods. To me they resemble Chicago more than NYC. That's not to say that you cannot find similar n-hoods in NYC (Bronx and Queens come to mind).
 
Old 07-01-2009, 01:10 PM
 
2,092 posts, read 5,867,791 times
Reputation: 918
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyDaysCopenhagenSkoal View Post
I would have to agree with ajf on this one. I've been to those neighborhoods. To me they resemble Chicago more than NYC. That's not to say that you cannot find similar n-hoods in NYC (Bronx and Queens come to mind).
I've lived in NYC for an extended period... Shaker Sq and the row of houses (one picture I posted) is VERY familiar to Upper Eastend in Manhattan. Not to mention the influence of Rockefeller, whom went on to develop in NYC. All I'm saying, there are very similar buildings/architecture in NYC to the cities I listed. If you read my post, you would understand I said they resemble Chicago as well, so you are pretty much agreeing with me. ajf got offended because I thought the neighborhoods in family lived in were ugly.. boo-freakin' hoo.
 
Old 07-01-2009, 01:19 PM
 
2,092 posts, read 5,867,791 times
Reputation: 918
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I have been visiting those two areas ever since I can remember for over 20 years...in no way do either of those places resemble NYC. They resemble Chicago far more than NYC, and I have been to the Chicago suburbs MANY times. As far as pathetic and embarrassing, you're the one that made the insinuations, so what was I supposed to think? You blow off any suggestion I make that could counter your opinion and say stuff arbitrarily. As far as embarrassing, you let me be the judge of that. And what was I supposed to think...you happen to like every part of Cleveland except the two areas I bring up...gee, somebody must be afraid of admitting they might be wrong. I don't care whether you like them or not...what I do care about is you thinking your opinion of them coincides with the truth...it doesn't, not in the least. I happen to really like both of these areas, and I know what you say about them is totally false, as I'm sure many of the residents there would agree. This a waste of time and space. Think what you want, just don't think you're right.
I can tell you are one of the conspiracy theorist. I don't like the areas you brought up, simply because I think they are unappealing to my tastes. I am by no means going to admit I am wrong when there are websites that confirm Cleveland architecture has many similarities to Chicago and NYC... I refuted they were alike Indy. This dates back to periods before the depression.

When did I say I liked every other area of Cleveland? WOW I can't even debate with you.. all you do is whine and cry and assume that I have some hidden agenda against you on an internet website.

Want me to list other areas I don't like? Ok I will: Parma, Euclid, Broookpark, Brooklyn, East Cleveland, etc.... Does that make you feel better

What is the most pathetic part about your response is saying I can't admit I am wrong. What am I wrong about? It's been noted that Cleveland has similar buildings to those built in NYC. I never said Cleveland is NYC. I also said Cleveland has similarities to Chicago.. which is true. Cleveland is NOT like Indy at all though, buddy.

And PLEASE quite talking about me not liking Beachwood or S. Euclid. That's a personal freaking opinion for christ sake. I've seen your type all too often. All you are doing is crying about how I hate your families areas, blah blah blah.. and that the residents will disagree with me, blah blah blah... that's why people are entitled to live where ever they chose.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post

My argument was that Lakewood, Shaker Heights, University Hts, Cleveland Heights, etc all share similarities to BOTH Chicago and NYC. This is heavily note and known widely by architectures. There are many websites that support this... it takes a simple google search or reading my old posts to find. Cleveland: Shaker Square - Part 2 There are some shots of Shaker. Check this post out while you're at it: http://www.city-data.com/forum/9518646-post33.html

Sad, I had to quote myself. I already agree that Cleveland is like Chicago in many aspects.. People sometimes refer to Cleveland as Chicago Jr. My whole point was there are very similar architecture in Cleveland/NYC dating back YEARS ago. I can post a website to confirm that if you really want. Lastly, please stop talking about how I don't like your families suburbs.. that's personal opinion. I listed my FAVORITE areas not any others I hated in response to you. I hate many areas in Northeast Ohio.
 
Old 07-02-2009, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Mequon, WI
7,835 posts, read 19,559,824 times
Reputation: 4430

YouTube - MIDWEST STREET RYDERS VOL. 1 INTRO
 
Old 07-02-2009, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Mequon, WI
7,835 posts, read 19,559,824 times
Reputation: 4430

YouTube - MIDWEST STREEET RYDERS VOL 3 MILWAUKEE SHOOT!!!
 
Old 07-03-2009, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,146,254 times
Reputation: 1113
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Pennsylvania is NOT the Upper Midwest or the Midwest, if that is what you are trying to argue. It is a Northeastern state, more specifically the Mid-Atlantic. It has the most in common with New York, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. The Upper Midwest is Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota...you could also add in Northern Illinois, Northern Indiana, and Northern Ohio. Philadelphia is not a Midwestern city..neither is Pittsburgh. Both feel and culturally are Northeastern.
I never implied Pennsylvania was an Upper Midwest state. I don't know how you could have possibly come to that conclusion. I was replying to a poster from Philadelphia who said he liked the Midwest but thought it was too conservative.
 
Old 07-03-2009, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,146,254 times
Reputation: 1113
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnybgood1999 View Post
It's simple for me: the midwest is devoid of mountains. Most of the rivers are muddy and dirty looking outside of the Ozarks and a few other isolated areas. The great lakes are nice, but again the topography doesn't compare to the rest of the country. That being said, I do like the people since I graduated in Gower MO!
I wasn't aware any other giant inland seas containing 20% of the Earth's freshwater existed in the US.
 
Old 07-03-2009, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,146,254 times
Reputation: 1113
Quote:
Originally Posted by fashionguy View Post
Agree with the river. The Mississippi river in Minneapolis (especially the section across the U of M)is very dirty. The Chicago river doesn't not look pleasant either, except in photos. Smaller cities in Midwest don't have as many jobs as small cities in California or the Northeast. In Midwest there is a big distinction between cities and small towns. Most states have a large land area, but only one or two big cities and the rest are very isolated therefore attract less jobs. The big cities are not close to the sea or the mountains (except Chicago and Milwaukee are close to Lake Michigan). The weather is the harshest here except maybe Alaska, hence the worst road conditions, full of potholes even on highways and not well lit. Most housing and buildings in cities look as grey and crappy as the old Northeast cities, but with less density and don't provide as many amenities. Lots of Industrial wastelands in cities are identified as having historic value and have to be preserved but in fact look ugly as hell. Living costs and job options fall short compared to rising Texas cities and the Sunbelt area in general.

Generally speaking, most cities in the Northeast are old and grey looking but they are dense and walkable, have superb rail transit, a lot more to offer. They have really beautiful historic buildings, with longer history, but better maintained and better looking than some warehouse or industrial wasteland. They are also clustered together, forming a very urban region. Cities in the South and West are newer and more colorful and more pleasant looking. California is uniformly dense, is the largest job market and the largest retail market as well. The cities in Pacific Northwest have developd well (Both Seattle and Portland are considered examples of what a city should be). The South are also developing all the amenities fast according to their growth. The largest cities in the South already surpassed most Midwest cities in terms of retail, transportation and art options. On the contrary, most Midwest cities are anti-development and backwards. And everywhere else in the country have better weather (except the Dakotas and Montana, of course, but these states don't actually have any reputation because most people only visit there and know very little about them). I guess that's why Midwest (except Chicago) does not get a good reputation.
Written like someone who has never even stepped foot in the Midwest.
 
Old 07-03-2009, 02:29 PM
 
2,092 posts, read 5,867,791 times
Reputation: 918
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
i wasn't aware any other giant inland seas containing 20% of the earth's freshwater existed in the us.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
written like someone who has never even stepped foot in the midwest.
lol!
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