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Old 04-01-2010, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,509 posts, read 7,454,824 times
Reputation: 10907

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
Perhaps the Great Plains states like Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Indiana, Southern Illinois, and Southern Ohio share commonalities with the Southern US, but the Great Lakes states have zero in common with the South.

Minnesota, Iowa to a lesser extent, Wisconsin, Northern Illinois, Michigan, and Northern Ohio have more in common with the Northeast states like Pennsylvania and Upstate NY than they do with the South or even the Great Plains states.


That is no where near true. The northeast is another planet from the upper midwest. The northeast has a totaly different feel to it, as it is much faster paced, much heavier population density. People are completly diffferent, have much different ethnic makeup and value system. I live in Michigan and I have seen several northeast people move out here, and promptly return to the east because they cannot handle the major culture shock they experience. The slower pace of life, lack of urban ammenities, lack of what they call culture, and too "hickish", are reasons for thier displeasure. Also your comment about nothing in common with the south is wrong as well. Chicago and Detroit both had HUGE influxes of southerners moving in to those cities during the first part of the 20th century. Much of the population of the Detroit area in Michigan are decended from southerners. The only influence the northeast states have left on the upper midwest are place names, as it was northeasterners who settled places like Mi, Wi and Mn back in the 1830s and 1840s. Thier influence has long ago been reduced by the large numbers of german immigrants in the late 1800s and southerners moving north a few years later. The upper midwest is a bit different from the lower midwest as you noted, but I believe that has to do with the large population of people with a German, Scandanavian or Dutch ancestory. The upper midwest is a unique place, and is certainly not comparable to the northeast. People from this part of the country would never say we have much in common with the northeastern states.

 
Old 04-01-2010, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Blue Ash, Ohio (Cincinnati)
2,786 posts, read 5,674,849 times
Reputation: 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
Why does everything have to be Southern for?

Not everyone that speaks with a different accent than you is necessarily affiliated with the South.

Also, all of this is relative. Try telling someone in Jackson, Mississippi that Columbus is in "the South"--they'd find that quite humorous.
Exactly.
 
Old 04-02-2010, 10:17 AM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,166,181 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
So you've extrapolated your scientific analysis of three people to the entire state and concluded that everyone talks like that? Please.

I am also originally from Michigan--the Lansing area--and have lived in this state for five years. People here in Fort Wayne, and Indianapolis in general, don't sound terribly different from what I was used to growing up.

Some people, especially in the lower third of the state, do have a different way of speaking, but even that doesn't apply to the majority.

No, I never said that EVERYONE talks like that. But, to the Hoosiers I have met, they've all had twang accents, so it's easy for me to assume that most people probably talk like that. My buddy's parents still have that southern twang, and they've lived here for 25 years.

I met a kid from Evansville on a retreat, and he had a twang too. It's just how you sound. Are you seriously going to sit there and act like people from different parts of the country DO NOT notice a difference in the dialect? That's just ignorant. So, to me, yes, most people from Indiana have a southern accent. Mind you, I've also been to Indiana a handful of times, as I have family there, as well as Michigan in Lansing, East Lansing, Battle Creek, Benton Harbor, and they sound differnt from the folks I've met in Indiana.

My cousins who grew up in East Lansing, MI also sounded different to all of us in MN too. It's not that astonishing. People in Northern Minnesota sound much different from Southern Minnesota. More noteably, people in Duluth sound like Canadians, or the movie Fargo compared to the Twin Cities.

If you met 3 people from MN you'd probably say they speak like Cananadians, but I doubt you would mean the entire state sounds like Canadians.

You are getting offended like it's a bad thing. It's not bad. I'd rather sound like a Hoosier than a Minnesotan.
 
Old 04-02-2010, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,530 posts, read 10,134,238 times
Reputation: 2384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
Why does everything have to be Southern for?

Not everyone that speaks with a different accent than you is necessarily affiliated with the South.

Also, all of this is relative. Try telling someone in Jackson, Mississippi that Columbus is in "the South"--they'd find that quite humorous.
What do you want to call it then, "hill-billy twang"...."drawl"? I don't care what you call it, it's just different from how some Northerners speak, and I don't think Northern is better by any means -- it's actually really annoying sometimes!

And what I thought was funny (at least in Ohio) was that nobody thought they had an accent, and that Ohio was accent-neutral or something. I recognize that I sound different to different people but don't get offended when somebody calls it out. Who f'in cares?
 
Old 04-02-2010, 01:07 PM
 
2,248 posts, read 6,205,020 times
Reputation: 2078
Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
If you met 3 people from MN you'd probably say they speak like Cananadians
No, I wouldnt. That's the difference between me and you: I wouldn't make that kind of inductive reasoning because there are too many variables that would come into play.

By the way, what is a Cananadian?
Quote:
but I doubt you would mean the entire state sounds like Canadians
So why would you imply that all 6.4 million people in Indiana speak with southern accents?

Quote:
You are getting offended like it's a bad thing
I'm not getting offended. Like I said, I'm not even from here.

See, the issue is not about who speaks what. The issue is people throwing around inaccurate information on a heavily-read forum.

Last edited by Colts; 04-02-2010 at 01:17 PM..
 
Old 04-02-2010, 01:16 PM
 
2,248 posts, read 6,205,020 times
Reputation: 2078
Quote:
Originally Posted by west336 View Post
What do you want to call it then
It's called Midland English, and unless you are an expert dialectologist, that's not up for debate.
By the way, I thought you'd like to know that experts agree that the Midland dialect is the dialect closest to "general American" English.
http://www.seattlepi.com/dayart/20050520/dialect-map-0520.gif (broken link)
Quote:
"hill-billy twang"
^^Completely unnecessary. How would you like it if someone said you and your friends and family spoke "hillbilly twang?"
Quote:
I don't care what you call it, it's just different from how some Northerners speak, and I don't think Northern is better by any means -- it's actually really annoying sometimes!
I don't disagree with this.
Quote:
And what I thought was funny (at least in Ohio) was that nobody thought they had an accent, and that Ohio was accent-neutral or something. I recognize that I sound different to different people but don't get offended when somebody calls it out. Who f'in cares?
Obviously you care, or else you wouldn't have responded to my post.
 
Old 04-02-2010, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,530 posts, read 10,134,238 times
Reputation: 2384
Okay, I live in Minneapolis right now...have lived in St. Louis, Columbus, and Chicago. What do I sound like? Don't forget to use your map!
 
Old 04-02-2010, 01:49 PM
 
871 posts, read 1,956,701 times
Reputation: 596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monelli View Post
Lack of jobs,bad weather and time looks to be standing still around here.I think PA is mediocre too.It`s the same ole ritual,same landscape,same life.
pennsylvania's mountainous landscape is drastically different from the flat midwest
 
Old 04-02-2010, 02:01 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,408,176 times
Reputation: 6702
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
That is no where near true. The northeast is another planet from the upper midwest. The northeast has a totaly different feel to it, as it is much faster paced, much heavier population density. People are completly diffferent, have much different ethnic makeup and value system. I live in Michigan and I have seen several northeast people move out here, and promptly return to the east because they cannot handle the major culture shock they experience. The slower pace of life, lack of urban ammenities, lack of what they call culture, and too "hickish", are reasons for thier displeasure. Also your comment about nothing in common with the south is wrong as well. Chicago and Detroit both had HUGE influxes of southerners moving in to those cities during the first part of the 20th century. Much of the population of the Detroit area in Michigan are decended from southerners. The only influence the northeast states have left on the upper midwest are place names, as it was northeasterners who settled places like Mi, Wi and Mn back in the 1830s and 1840s. Thier influence has long ago been reduced by the large numbers of german immigrants in the late 1800s and southerners moving north a few years later. The upper midwest is a bit different from the lower midwest as you noted, but I believe that has to do with the large population of people with a German, Scandanavian or Dutch ancestory. The upper midwest is a unique place, and is certainly not comparable to the northeast. People from this part of the country would never say we have much in common with the northeastern states.
I'm a native Minnesotan and would disagree with much of your sweeping statement. You are forgetting that not all of the NE is New York City, and not all of the Midwest is rural or small town. Or all Scandinavian and German, for that matter. I find there to be many similarities between parts of the NE and parts of the upper midwest -- including things like population density, diversity, and "values." Just because you live in what sounds like a small town (since you reference lack of urban amenities) does not mean that all Midwesterners do. I agree that every region has its own unique flavor, but let's put aside once and for all this view that somehow the Midwest is rural, the Northeast is urban, and there are somehow different values at work. (if anything, the NE and the upper Midwest seem to be similar on the values front, at least as seen through politics; both are "blue state" territory)
 
Old 04-02-2010, 03:53 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,166,181 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
No, I wouldnt. That's the difference between me and you: I wouldn't make that kind of inductive reasoning because there are too many variables that would come into play.

By the way, what is a Cananadian?

So why would you imply that all 6.4 million people in Indiana speak with southern accents?


I'm not getting offended. Like I said, I'm not even from here.

See, the issue is not about who speaks what. The issue is people throwing around inaccurate information on a heavily-read forum.
Wow, do you know the difference between opinion and facts? Because Facts are information.

"Throwing out inaccurate information.."

Sorry, but it's my OPINION that from the people I've met from Indiana, or that live in Indiana, they tend to have dialects that are different than where I'm from. From my experience in travelling around the country, people from Indiana or who live in Indiana, have accents that sound similar to a southern-twang.

I also never implied that EVERYONE in Indiana talks like that, go read my posts, I said everyone I have met from Indiana talks with a southern twang. You're the one who keeps gereralizing it.
I'll keep posting this man, all day.
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