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Old 04-02-2010, 03:58 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,170,886 times
Reputation: 1809

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyJohnWilson View Post
pennsylvania's mountainous landscape is drastically different from the flat midwest

I live in the Midwest, and in a town that is Hillier than anywhere in Pennsylvania. So there.

 
Old 04-02-2010, 07:24 PM
 
2,248 posts, read 6,208,158 times
Reputation: 2078
Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
I'll keep posting this man, all day.
Go right ahead. It speaks volumes about your maturity.
 
Old 04-02-2010, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,465,981 times
Reputation: 10927
Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
I'm a native Minnesotan and would disagree with much of your sweeping statement. You are forgetting that not all of the NE is New York City, and not all of the Midwest is rural or small town. Or all Scandinavian and German, for that matter. I find there to be many similarities between parts of the NE and parts of the upper midwest -- including things like population density, diversity, and "values." Just because you live in what sounds like a small town (since you reference lack of urban amenities) does not mean that all Midwesterners do. I agree that every region has its own unique flavor, but let's put aside once and for all this view that somehow the Midwest is rural, the Northeast is urban, and there are somehow different values at work. (if anything, the NE and the upper Midwest seem to be similar on the values front, at least as seen through politics; both are "blue state" territory)

No not all of the midwest is small town, but it is FAR MORE rural. Most northeast states have 3 or 4 times the population density as any midwest state. New Jersey for example is well over 1000 people per square mile, New York is 400. Compare that to Minnesota which is about 70 people per square mile, Wisconsin and Michigan are both in the 100's per square mile. Illinois and Ohio have the greatest population density of any midwest states and they dont come near those numbers. Yes there are urban areas like Minneapolis, Chicago, Milwalkee or Grand Rapids, but the vast majority of the midwest has very low population density. Just driving through a state like New Jersey, you can tell, heck even feel the crowdedness of the place. Im not slamming the NE, but it is very very different from the midwest. Now you mention the blue state/political issue. Do you really think the states that are blue in the midwest are similar to places like Mass, NY or NJ???? Most of the midwest states only go blue by a percent or two in most elections. My state of Michigan may vote blue because of auto unions and farm subsidies, but that does not make it similar to an ultra liberal place like NJ or Mass. For example in the same year that Kerry won Mi by 2%, the state voted overwhelmingly to ban gay marriage. Anti hunting measures are impossible to pass here. The liberal agenda fails, everytime someone tries to pass it. The only reason this state votes democrat ever is because the unions support them.
 
Old 04-02-2010, 10:19 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,419,189 times
Reputation: 6702
I used to live just across the river from NJ. There are definitely rural, small town parts of the state. And spend some time driving through the state of NY: the numbers are skewed by New York City, but there are still vast parts of the state that feel uncrowded and rural. The area around Saratoga Springs visually reminded me a lot of northern MN.

And yeah, since you ask, I do think many of the blue states -- or at least the blue cities -- in the upper midwest are pretty similar in terms of politics to the blue cities in the NE. As an "ultra liberal" person I definitely felt at home during my time living and visiting New England and the mid-Atlantic. I wouldn't have felt at home in every area -- not all parts of those states are so liberal, either (look at Romney).

I think you are making the error of assuming that your experiences in Michigan represent all of the Midwest, as well as assuming that the NE is so extremely ultra liberal or that the upper Midwest isn't liberal.

I agree that the NE has more urban areas, and bigger cities, but I don't think the differences when comparing regions as a whole are all that different. Other than the stereotypes given to them by both insiders and outsiders, perhaps.
 
Old 04-02-2010, 10:45 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,084 posts, read 34,165,985 times
Reputation: 16839
Like I have said before, there isn't that much difference between the Northeast and the Midwest when it comes to the people, OR the amount of rural areas. I have lived in Michigan for 24 years and I lived in Maine for 20 years. My wife is from MA, and I have family that live in NH, MA, and VT. I know the Northeast and I know the Midwest, especially MI. Generalizing that the entire Northeast is less rural than the Midwest because of density stats is just as wrong as somebody basing their view of the Midwest on either Detroit or Chicago alone.
 
Old 04-02-2010, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,465,981 times
Reputation: 10927
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Like I have said before, there isn't that much difference between the Northeast and the Midwest when it comes to the people, OR the amount of rural areas. I have lived in Michigan for 24 years and I lived in Maine for 20 years. My wife is from MA, and I have family that live in NH, MA, and VT. I know the Northeast and I know the Midwest, especially MI. Generalizing that the entire Northeast is less rural than the Midwest because of density stats is just as wrong as somebody basing their view of the Midwest on either Detroit or Chicago alone.

Im not bashing the NE, but the statistics do not lie. Overall, most places in the northeast are much more populated. I have not looked up maines stats, but no doubt it is way lower than the rest of the NE. Your right about that place, very rural and parts of it are as isolated as upper Michigan or the arrowhead of Mn. Now the rest of the NE is different, even the outlying areas tend to be more populated. Can you find rural areas and small towns in the NE states, well yes you can but it is not as easy as it is here in Michigan. Also here in Michigan if you live in the city, a short drive and your out. If your in Bosh-Wash cooridoor, it is not as easy. I know you and one other poster in here disagree with me, but I still think the northeast is way different from the midwest. When I go to New England, it feels like another planet. Heck in some areas I can hardly understand the accents. Now a trip below mason-dixon, while very different from home does not feel as alien to me as a trip to the northeast.
 
Old 04-02-2010, 11:38 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,084 posts, read 34,165,985 times
Reputation: 16839
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Im not bashing the NE, but the statistics do not lie. Overall, most places in the northeast are much more populated. I have not looked up maines stats, but no doubt it is way lower than the rest of the NE. Your right about that place, very rural and parts of it are as isolated as upper Michigan or the arrowhead of Mn. Now the rest of the NE is different, even the outlying areas tend to be more populated. Can you find rural areas and small towns in the NE states, well yes you can but it is not as easy as it is here in Michigan. Also here in Michigan if you live in the city, a short drive and your out. If your in Bosh-Wash cooridoor, it is not as easy. I know you and one other poster in here disagree with me, but I still think the northeast is way different from the midwest. When I go to New England, it feels like another planet. Heck in some areas I can hardly understand the accents. Now a trip below mason-dixon, while very different from home does not feel as alien to me as a trip to the northeast.
Actually you can find rural towns just as easily in most of the Northeast States as you can in Michigan (exception being Northern Maine where there isn't any towns at all and you have to drive a LONG way to get to one). There is NOTHING in the UP of Michigan that is similar to the remoteness of the North Maine Woods. You keep comparing the entire Northeast region to the Bos/Wash corridor. Very little outside of that corridor is like that. That would be exactly like trying to say Detroit is a good indicator for the rest of Michigan, or Chicago is a good indication of the rest of IL. It simply isn't true. I know, I lived there for a couple decades, my job/family-ties took me to EVERY single County in ME, VT, NH, and MA. Curiosity took me to every single County in NY, CT and PA. Missed a few in DE, MD, NJ, and RI.
 
Old 04-03-2010, 08:40 AM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,170,886 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
Go right ahead. It speaks volumes about your maturity.

Just like you keep arguing against an opinion?
 
Old 04-03-2010, 07:14 PM
 
2,248 posts, read 6,208,158 times
Reputation: 2078
Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
I don't think the differences when comparing regions as a whole are all that different. Other than the stereotypes given to them by both insiders and outsiders, perhaps.
It's quite unfortunate that stereotypes have so much influence on people's perceptions of a region, or a group of people. I think the media helps to perpetuate them, too.

We're really not all that different, though.
 
Old 04-04-2010, 07:39 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,170,886 times
Reputation: 1809
I do agree that the midwest just isn't as dense as other regions. There's just not a saturation of people. Sometimes that's good, sometimes that's bad.
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