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Old 04-14-2010, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Hillsboro, OR
2,200 posts, read 3,792,726 times
Reputation: 1366

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PA has a very large mountain range dissecting it called the Appalachians. It's highest point is over 3,000 ft above sea level.

Now the midwest has hills for sure. Northern Michigan and Minnesota are great examples of this. It's very hilly right here near Omaha and KC, and again south of St Louis, in S Indiana, and S Ohio. None of these places are like PA, with the exception of extreme SE Ohio.

 
Old 04-14-2010, 07:08 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,169,979 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
Do you really believe what you're saying?

Here are terrain maps of Duluth and Pittsburgh----proof that Pittsburgh is much hillier than Duluth. (Just click on terrain view and zoom into the areas.)

duluth MN - Google Maps

pittsburgh pa - Google Maps

Pittsburgh's metro population is larger by over 2 million people. (Pittsburgh 2.5 million > Duluth 250k)

Pittsburgh is hillier and larger. Duluth is more like a town compared to Pittsburgh.

I don't know what you're arguing, and your links are cute, but the post i responded to a user that said "There are hills in PA that are bigger than ANYWHERE in the midwest, you clearly have NEVER been to PA"

And I responed with "Actually, I live in one of the hilliest bigger cities in America, and Ironically it's in the Midwest" and I have been to PA. So I pwnd that user's post.

According to C-D, not Google. Pittsburgh's highest point is 1,223 ft and lowest point is 696 ft, difference of 527 ft. Duluth's highest point is 1,485 ft and lowest point is 605 ft, difference of 880 ft.

I'm not talking about sizes of cities, but Duluth is a hilly city. And it's in the Midwest. So, the BS that the user said was wrong. And sorry, not using 'Google Maps' as imperical evidence that Duluth IS a hilly city. It's built on a hill. We have 2 weather temperatures because THATS how much the temp varies from the bottom to the highest point.

Last edited by knke0204; 04-14-2010 at 07:21 PM.. Reason: Had to check if I spelled anything wrong, or else the elitist east costers will bash you on a cheap internet forum for doing
 
Old 04-14-2010, 07:17 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,169,979 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Let's see. I post detailed information and facts from a manufacturing journal that shows how the Twin Cities ranks 4th in the country in total manufacturing. And as state? 14th. Clearly manufacturing plays a vital role in your economy. And guess what? I have lived in your state and worked in several manufacturing firms in past years. It is abundantly clear to me that you simply are uninformed about your own state's economic engine.

And what does Bob Dylan have to do with anything? Non sequitur.

Whatever you do, please do not move to New England. We don't want people like you.

Can you people please read better.

I never said that MN DOESN'T rely on Manufactuing. What I said was that comparing MN to the Manufactring devestation of places like PA, OH, IN, and MI, there isn't even a comparison. MN was merely hurt by the rust belt phenomenon, other than the Iron Range, but still nothing that compares to places like Cleveland, Pitts, Detroit...

I guess we're just the leading state in producing corn, soy beans and other agriculture for nothing..

And I mentioned Bob Dylan because some douche mentioned Robert Fripp in WV, so ask him what Robert Fripp has anything to do with um, anything.

Ha, and I've been to New England, you can keep it.

Last edited by knke0204; 04-14-2010 at 07:25 PM.. Reason: Purposely spelled Manufacturing wrong to see if another d bag would call me out for spelling something wrong
 
Old 04-14-2010, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,411,770 times
Reputation: 10115
Quote:
Originally Posted by psulions2007 View Post
PA has a very large mountain range dissecting it called the Appalachians. It's highest point is over 3,000 ft above sea level.

Now the midwest has hills for sure. Northern Michigan and Minnesota are great examples of this. It's very hilly right here near Omaha and KC, and again south of St Louis, in S Indiana, and S Ohio. None of these places are like PA, with the exception of extreme SE Ohio.
Here's just a few really quick examples of Midwestern hills. Theyre not as high in elevation as the Appalachians, but Im sure there are many that are just as high from base to summit as some in PA (not the ones in the photos below).

Missouri:
Flickr Photo Download: Taum Sauk Lower Lake (http://www.flickr.com/photos/makatsuta/825210566/sizes/o/ - broken link)

Illinois:
Flickr Photo Download: Cherokee Music (http://www.flickr.com/photos/serrator/1682695388/sizes/l/ - broken link)

Minnesota:
on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/espie/2849599858/ - broken link)

Wisconsin:
Morning - Alma Wisconsin on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/bellemorgan/3936499509/ - broken link)

Flickr Photo Download: Farming Wisconsin Style (http://www.flickr.com/photos/carquestguy/956611907/sizes/l/ - broken link)
 
Old 04-14-2010, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Blue Ash, Ohio (Cincinnati)
2,786 posts, read 5,677,444 times
Reputation: 705
Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania are plenty more hilly than Minnesota and Duluth. Here's the thing, look at it this way, the farther west you head, the "hillier" it gets. That is because you are steadily getting higher once you get towards the Rocky Mountains. For crying out loud, look at Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, and even parts of Wisconsin and Minnesota. They are flat as a pancake, but their elevations are higher than what you find back east. The reason, once again, the Rocky Mountains, you are getting closer to them.

Pittsburgh maybe smaller in elevation, but it is so much more hilly than anything in Minnesota. If people who have actually said they have been to PA really went, then they would know this. If you have two eyes that can see, then you will notice it.

And whoever said Minnesota or Duluth never had bad economic times, they were wrong. Minneapolis is a great city! One of my most favorite in the country, but Minnesota is part of the rust belt, and carries many characteristics of the rust belt. And Duluth will never even be able to be compared to Pittsburgh or Cleveland. These cities have history, diversity, are underrated, and get over-looked a lot. They have showed anyone who visits how one can turn around.

BTW, Duluth has been declining in population since the 1970s. Another rust belt characteristic.
 
Old 04-14-2010, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Blue Ash, Ohio (Cincinnati)
2,786 posts, read 5,677,444 times
Reputation: 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
Can you people please read better.

I never said that MN DOESN'T rely on Manufactuing. What I said was that comparing MN to the Manufacturing devestation of places like PA, OH, IN, and MI, there isn't even a comparison. MN was merely hurt by the rust belt phenomenon, other than the Iron Range, but still nothing that compares to places like Cleveland, Pitts, Detroit...

And I mentioned Bob Dylan because some douche mentioned Robert Fripp in WV, so ask him what Robert Fripp has anything to do with um, anything.

Ha, and I've been to New England, you can keep it.
Honestly, Cleveland and Pittsburgh are two of some of the most livable cities on the continent. They have diversified their economies, have large universities, and are home to some of the best medical facilities known to man.

Detroit on the otherhand, well that is a different story.
 
Old 04-14-2010, 07:33 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,169,979 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beavercreek33 View Post
Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania are plenty more hilly than Minnesota and Duluth. Here's the thing, look at it this way, the farther west you head, the "hillier" it gets. That is because you are steadily getting higher once you get towards the Rocky Mountains. For crying out loud, look at Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, and even parts of Wisconsin and Minnesota. They are flat as a pancake, but their elevations are higher than what you find back east. The reason, once again, the Rocky Mountains, you are getting closer to them.

Pittsburgh maybe smaller in elevation, but it is so much more hilly than anything in Minnesota. If people who have actually said they have been to PA really went, then they would know this. If you have two eyes that can see, then you will notice it.

And whoever said Minnesota or Duluth never had bad economic times, they were wrong. Minneapolis is a great city! One of my most favorite in the country, but Minnesota is part of the rust belt, and carries many characteristics of the rust belt. And Duluth will never even be able to be compared to Pittsburgh or Cleveland. These cities have history, diversity, are underrated, and get over-looked a lot. They have showed anyone who visits how one can turn around.

BTW, Duluth has been declining in population since the 1970s. Another rust belt characteristic.

Yeah, losing thousands of jobs will do that. But to compare Duluth on the same pages of Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Erie, Detroit just doesn't do justice.

And how is Minnesota part of the rust belt? Because tiny towns on the range lost production? Boo, hoo same story goes for groups of small towns in ANY state in the US, regardless of which type of output they relied on. Is it because Duluth once had a population of 110,000 and dropped to 86,000 over a 30 yr period?

Go tell that to some people in Pittsburgh, Cleveland and true rust belt places, that Duluth lost 24,000 people over a 20-30 yr period.
 
Old 04-14-2010, 07:34 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,169,979 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beavercreek33 View Post
Honestly, Cleveland and Pittsburgh are two of some of the most livable cities on the continent. They have diversified their economies, have large universities, and are home to some of the best medical facilities known to man.

Detroit on the otherhand, well that is a different story.

Ok, cool, but they still had devestating Manufacturing losses from the 1970s onward, and that's what we're discussing
 
Old 04-14-2010, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,411,770 times
Reputation: 10115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beavercreek33 View Post
Minnesota is part of the rust belt, and carries many characteristics of the rust belt
If you consider some hard-hit towns that are struggling with job losses, factories being shuttered, then EVERY state in this great nation of ours has "rust belt" characteristics.

I can reassure you, however, that MN is NOT rust belt.
 
Old 04-14-2010, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Blue Ash, Ohio (Cincinnati)
2,786 posts, read 5,677,444 times
Reputation: 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
Ok, cool, but they still had devestating Manufacturing losses from the 1970s onward, and that's what we're discussing
You are clearly a Minnesota cheerleader who wants to sugar-coat anything Minnesota.

Lets see, you clearly also do not know anything about Cleveland or Pittsburgh, and judge it off of what you have seen on t.v or read. Truly pathetic on your part. Onward, job losses? Once again, read up on your facts. Major job losses in Cleveland and Pittsburgh stopped in the 1980s, (jobs losses still happen just like anywhere else) the 1990s were pivotal turning points for the cities. If you want to talk about major job losses today, then like I said, look at Detroit. Based on one industry, the auto industry, they are shedding jobs left and right.

Duluth is still loosing people! For 30 years now they have been. Like I said, rust belt characteristic. Pittsburgh and Cleveland are larger cities, I would expect probaly bigger population losses from them, more people, so you will see more people moving out. Duluth is a smaller city, so they will loose smaller RAW numbers in their population. Its common sense.

Now, clearly "boo hoo" , its time for your bedtime!

Good night...
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