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Old 04-17-2010, 11:07 AM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,165,159 times
Reputation: 1809

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
The guy is incredibly ignorant. Pure and simple. After reading his latest posts it is obvious he cannot accurately convey his thoughts to "paper" and get his message across. He types one thing and believes he is saying one thing, but virtually everyone that reads what he posts interpret his message as something different than he intends.

What can't you interpret? Seriously? I keep coming on here and am amazed at how you still don't understand what I'm saying

Somebody made a stupid comment, and I responded.
All I said is that I live in a really hilly city, in the Midwest, and that I have been to PA. If you don't understand that, then that's your problem, not my ignorance.

Also, I said that MN isn't as much of a Manufacturing state as others, and that Agriculture is on the top of our list. I also will consistently keep arguing that MN is not a Rust Belt state, however places like Duluth have been effected by the loss of Manufacturing jobs in the US, just like other places.

 
Old 04-17-2010, 11:40 AM
 
5,721 posts, read 9,084,153 times
Reputation: 2460
Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
What can't you interpret? Seriously? I keep coming on here and am amazed at how you still don't understand what I'm saying

Somebody made a stupid comment, and I responded.
All I said is that I live in a really hilly city, in the Midwest, and that I have been to PA. If you don't understand that, then that's your problem, not my ignorance.

Also, I said that MN isn't as much of a Manufacturing state as others, and that Agriculture is on the top of our list. I also will consistently keep arguing that MN is not a Rust Belt state, however places like Duluth have been effected by the loss of Manufacturing jobs in the US, just like other places.
Thou are precious oh nectar filled form. I know what you said and so do quite a number of people. This is precisely why several of us took you to task for your comments and alleged facts that you posted.

You said PA was not very hilly and that Duluth was hillier than any community in PA. And you tried to pass off other dopey statements as fact as well such as stating MN was not much of a manufacturing state. I saw your first post about this subject and that is the context in which it was written. As a matter of fact Minnesota until recently was seeing growth in Manufacturing unlike most rust belt states (not calling MN a Rust Belt state. That is debatable.) which saw a decline. Again the Twin Cities is the 4th largest manufacturing center in the country and the state rank is around 14th. By anyone's definition that makes it a major manufacturing state.

Read this:

http://www.demography.state.mn.us/documents/mfgpn.pdf

A sampling of your idiotic statements I am posting in this string for your review.

#241 - I live in the Midwest, and in a town that is Hillier than anywhere in Pennsylvania. So there.

#252 - You say that there are parts of PA that are hillier than anywhere in the midwest, when that's just not true, especially when I live in the midwest in one of the hilliest cities in America.

I have been to PA too, just Philly though.

#302 - Interesting jab. Go read a book though, seriously. The death of manufacturing that was once very preveltent in Detroit is what has killed that place, not people 'goofing' around at work. Nice way to look ignorant.

Also, it's 'THEIR', not 'THIER'

Reminds me of something I saw on the news last night. A sign made in WV for the coal miners in someone's yard read: "Keeping the miners and thier families in our prayers"

Good job on that education West Virginia. I know yours was just a silly typo, but the WV sign was funny!

#268 - 99% of Americans should know how to spell 'THEIR'

I bet less than 50% can spell Prevalent.

#270 - What are you talking about? Minnesota isn't much of a manufacturing state. Our economy depends on agriculture and tourism. The Twin Cities aren't the rust belt, again, pick up a book. I guess I'll have to drive by the Mansions of CEOs of Best Buy, Target, Cargill, General Mills, 3M, USBANK, Wells Fargo (CEO from MN and still has homes here) and we can discuss why they have their World Wide companies in our backyard and NOT in West Virginia.

And my initial post was me laughing at the sign. Just thinking it was ironic how WV people on C-D will fight tooth and nail to avoid being stereotyped as the back-water, deliverence, toothless redneck area that most of America thinks of WV, and the first media exposure I see on a large scale of WV is a fat, horribly dressed woman with a sign that spells THIER. It was more ironic and anecdotal than anything, and you self-conscious, insecure babies took it the wrong way. To me, I KNOW it was ironic that I spelled a word wrong while calling out somebody who had done so. All I know is if I'm going to take the time to make a sign in big letters, I'm going to make sure I spell THEIR right. When I'm checking up C-D in my few free minutes at work and quickly type something wrong on an internet forum, I couldn't care less.
 
Old 04-17-2010, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Hillsboro, OR
2,200 posts, read 3,790,765 times
Reputation: 1366
Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
Ok, well then don't say that PA has more hills than anywhere in the Midwest.

You are clearly a troll.
 
Old 04-17-2010, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,394,762 times
Reputation: 1305
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN55 View Post
Another Minnesotan here.

Northeastern Minnesota is very much a part of the rust belt. Gt to Hibbing, Grand Rapids, Chisholm, Virginia, Eveleth, or Duluth and try and tell me it is not a part of the rust belt; it's as rust belt as you can get. This isn't a bad thing either; old rust belt cities can be amazing places if managed right. I hope someday Duluth can be revitalized - the location is too good to spoil. That being said, it is true that Minnesota's economy is not nearly as dependent on manufacturing and mining as other states. Agriculture is larger and the Twin Cities MSA has the seventh highest concentration of Fortune 500 HQ's in the US.

And yes, MN has some of the best schools in the country. Of all the states that primarily take the ACT (basically the South and Midwest/the flyover states), MN has the highest average score.
ACT Scores
Only schools in New England and the rest of the Upper Midwest rival ours in terms of the sheer percent of schools that are good. There are no bad school districts in the state while it is common in other states where people pay double the prices for similar houses less than a mile away just to get in the better district. You don't have that in MN.
Minnesota's ACT numbers are only based off 68% of students.
 
Old 04-17-2010, 03:19 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,084 posts, read 34,145,269 times
Reputation: 16839
Quote:
Originally Posted by thePR View Post
Minnesota's ACT numbers are only based off 68% of students.
Right, mostly those that are college bound. Several other states use the ACT as part of their testing for NCLB and ALL students take it, college bound or not.
 
Old 04-17-2010, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,394,762 times
Reputation: 1305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Right, mostly those that are college bound. Several other states use the ACT as part of their testing for NCLB and ALL students take it, college bound or not.
I see.

And while I am not arguing about Minnesota's quality of high schools, I am discounting using ACT scores as a way of showing that.
 
Old 04-17-2010, 04:10 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,084 posts, read 34,145,269 times
Reputation: 16839
Quote:
Originally Posted by thePR View Post
I see.

And while I am not arguing about Minnesota's quality of high schools, I am discounting using ACT scores as a way of showing that.
I was agreeing with you that it isn't a good way to show quality of schools.
 
Old 04-17-2010, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,394,762 times
Reputation: 1305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
I was agreeing with you that it isn't a good way to show quality of schools.
I know, I said that for MN55.
 
Old 04-17-2010, 05:41 PM
 
Location: South South Jersey
1,652 posts, read 3,407,862 times
Reputation: 734
'The Midwest' isn't a real place. 'The Midwest' is a state of 'badness,' and so therefore its component states can shift depending on what sort of 'badness' the speaker wants to emphasize. If it's 'flatness,' the Great Plains states are emphasized, and, weirdly, Oklahoma (and even Texas!) are often included. (The highest peak east of the Rockies is in a Great Plains state, actually. ) This is also true when people want to emphasize a lack of "culture." They forget about Chicago, suddenly - an amazingly HUGE city and the second largest financial center in the nation, with more culture, innovative cuisine, fashion, etc. than any one person could feasibly experience in her/his own lifetime (with an unbelievably gorgeous setting on Lake Michigan, to boot). Most Canadians are proud of Toronto and don't consider its setting on one of the Great Lakes to be a tremendous problem. But once we're talking within a United States paradigm, suddenly a city situated on one of the Great Lakes is in a horrible dry desert, since it's not on a "coast," 'dude.'

If the speaker wants to emphasizse "Rust Belt" characteristics (and this has oddly become more and more common of late), (s)he focuses on states like Michigan and Ohio. While there is no official definition of 'Rust Belt,' if we use the term as it's been used semi-informally by most economists/sociologists for years, a higher percentage of the Rust Belt is on the "East Coast" than in the "Midwest." (In fact, there are plenty of "Rust Belt" cities in "Ivy League" [I'm borrowing another poster's term, here ] Connecticut, but you'd never see a low-brow comedy about Blue Collar people set there - unless it was an indie film made by a native of a CT industrial town, perhaps.)

Sometimes 'Midwest' refers to almost any state that doesn't touch a coastline. Religiosity is often emphasized by speakers critical of the mythical 'Midwest,' even though the 'Bible Belt' (and fundie-ism in general) is very much a Southern entity. But then I would argue that parts of what's popularly considered the 'Midwest' ARE Southern - Missouri, for instance, and the southern halves of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. Sometimes 'Midwestern' simply means "rural," even though the region (I'll pretend there is one for the purposes of this post) is thick with lots of very cool mid-sized cities. The inland/non-coastal West, on the other hand, is BY FAR the most rural part of the United States, but it doesn't have a handy 'label' ("Inland West" is one I just invented for this post), so it gets ignored.

I think 'Midwest' needs to be abolished as a term. I would strongly prefer, for instance, "Great Lakes (States)" and "Great Plains (States)." With the latter, you'd have Nebraska, the Dakotas, etc. suddenly being properly grouped with states like Wyoming - ones with which they have more in common than they do, for instance, a state like Ohio. Also, the Great Lakes states would suddenly seem less dry and dusty to average Joes living in Mid-Atlantic states. Really, what you need to remember is that state boundaries don't often represent actual cultural/economic/topographic boundaries. But no one's going to bother doing this, because humans like to keep things cognitively simple, and they LOVE stereotypes - the mass media and entertainment industries know this well. They also know that the bulk of the U.S. population lives along the Northeastern seaboard. Oh, and that they don't like being laughed at or laughing at themselves.

Anyway, though, it's interesting to me that the media is focusing a bit more on the so-called 'Midwest' in their bad comedies and such than they have in quite some time (they mostly limited the mockery to the South for quite awhile there - mostly I think because 1.) everyone hated fundies when Bush II was president and 2.) movie people had finally grown out of the parochial belief that anyone living in any rural area in any part of the U.S. had a Southern accent). I think the newfound focus on the Midwest has a lot to do with an insanely, insanely symplistic new "coasts" vs. "Flyova Country" model (which sort of protects the South, since quite a bit of it is coastal ). Also, in movieland, the 'Midwest' is less and less being portrayed as nothing but farmland (even primarily agricultural states Minnesota - I think this is largely because Minnesota is more apt to be conflated in a person's mind with Michigan than a state like, say, Iowa would be - there are details too complicated to go into in this post, though). It is now a bad bombed out 'Rust Belt.' Forget upstate NY. Forget the many, many East Coast cities that resemble Bridgeport, CT. Forget the mill towns of New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Forget PA, even. For the nonce, Midwest=Rust Belt, so we'd better get used to it.

Last edited by Alicia Bradley; 04-17-2010 at 06:03 PM..
 
Old 04-17-2010, 07:38 PM
 
96 posts, read 166,315 times
Reputation: 36
i agree with just about everybody on here who is in favor of the midwest loosing attention i think it has been that way for years i have dreamed of going to chicago in with just what i have heard in what my father read a while back in the new york times stating chicago is one of the most relaxed cities in america for immigrants to settle and feel relaxed i think he said it was in the new york times like two months ago if someone gave me a million dollars to move to any city in the world it would be chicago i think it is beutiful and has some of the best style in building architecture and not to mention from everyone who i know that has been there they have told me the people are off the chane in friendlyness its ashame more cities cant be like that i am not saying the midwest is a saint nor chicago but from what surveys and people i know have told me it is a beutiful city and very overlooked it is the only city in america that you can do just about anything you can do in any other city but with only a head count of a little over 2 million people chicago seems to be very overlooked in film and television especially with mafia movies and tv shows and just all around good cop shows i think if more people went there they would be surprised.
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