U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 05-11-2012, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,707,623 times
Reputation: 15560

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Actually there are very very few conservation lands in the Midwest to enjoy being outdoors since many states have a 99% private ownership rate. That is not the case at all in other regions in the country when you have a much higher percentage of public lands or conservation lands. While one can find national forests and conserved lands at the periphery of the Midwest (Northwoods, Ohio Valley, northern Ozarks) not much can be found at all near the core of the region.
Mark Twain Forest IS in the core of the region.
"Mark Twain National Forestís 1.5 million acres through 29 southern and central Missouri counties is known for its rivers and trails."
Mark Twain National Forest - Home

 
Old 05-11-2012, 09:32 AM
 
Location: IN
20,845 posts, read 35,927,262 times
Reputation: 13282
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
Mark Twain Forest IS in the core of the region.
"Mark Twain National Forestís 1.5 million acres through 29 southern and central Missouri counties is known for its rivers and trails."
Mark Twain National Forest - Home
Yes, I didn't say that Missouri DIDN'T have a large amount of public lands and national forest lands. The states that have next to no public land (unless you get permission from the private landowner to use their land) are: Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, and Illinois.
 
Old 05-11-2012, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Maryland
4,266 posts, read 5,471,909 times
Reputation: 4591
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Actually there are very very few conservation lands in the Midwest to enjoy being outdoors since many states have a 99% private ownership rate. That is not the case at all in other regions in the country when you have a much higher percentage of public lands or conservation lands. While one can find national forests and conserved lands at the periphery of the Midwest (Northwoods, Ohio Valley, northern Ozarks) not much can be found at all near the core of the region.
But how does that stop me from going hiking in a park (state or national)? Cross-country skiing on a trail? Trail running? Outdoor biking? Swimming in a lake? I live in south-central Wisconsin and have never been at a loss for things to do outdoors (except maybe climbing a mountain, which I acknowledge we don't have here). We have plenty of recreational opportunities here, urban or rural. Cities own/run a number of urban parks and trails here...and 1% of land is still a lot of land!
 
Old 05-11-2012, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,707,623 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Yes, I didn't say that Missouri DIDN'T have a large amount of public lands and national forest lands. The states that have next to no public land (unless you get permission from the private landowner to use their land) are: Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, and Illinois.
You know, you never did answer the question I asked you in post #425, its something I would really like to know the answer to.
 
Old 05-11-2012, 12:10 PM
 
Location: IN
20,845 posts, read 35,927,262 times
Reputation: 13282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
But how does that stop me from going hiking in a park (state or national)? Cross-country skiing on a trail? Trail running? Outdoor biking? Swimming in a lake? I live in south-central Wisconsin and have never been at a loss for things to do outdoors (except maybe climbing a mountain, which I acknowledge we don't have here). We have plenty of recreational opportunities here, urban or rural. Cities own/run a number of urban parks and trails here...and 1% of land is still a lot of land!
So the cities or towns own the rights to the trails and they are public access? Ok, that wouldn't be that bad. I have been on many hiking trails through the Wisconsin Dells, as I recall a state park in that region. Of course I prefer the Northwoods and all of the trails up in Vilas and Oneida counties. I like mountain hiking the most and NH has a plethora of trails within the National Forest that I use or the Appalachian Trail. Wisconsin does have a fair amount of national forests and trails by Midwest standards, though.
 
Old 05-11-2012, 12:13 PM
 
Location: IN
20,845 posts, read 35,927,262 times
Reputation: 13282
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
As far as your claim that rural areas in the lower Midwest are not as well maintained, you wouldnt mind providing some credible data to back that up, would you?
Southern Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Missouri all have median household incomes well below the national average. Now, the "Mississippi Hills" region of Missouri is an exception to the rule with higher incomes and lower levels of poverty compared to national averages.

State and County QuickFacts
 
Old 05-11-2012, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,707,623 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Southern Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Missouri all have median household incomes well below the national average. Now, the "Mississippi Hills" region of Missouri is an exception to the rule with higher incomes and lower levels of poverty compared to national averages.

State and County QuickFacts
But that doesnt prove anything.
Some of the poorest counties in the Bootheel have the best looking farms.
 
Old 05-11-2012, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Columbus, OH
189 posts, read 340,769 times
Reputation: 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Actually there are very very few conservation lands in the Midwest to enjoy being outdoors since many states have a 99% private ownership rate. That is not the case at all in other regions in the country when you have a much higher percentage of public lands or conservation lands. While one can find national forests and conserved lands at the periphery of the Midwest (Northwoods, Ohio Valley, northern Ozarks) not much can be found at all near the core of the region.
That really hasn't prevented me from enjoying the fantastic Cleveland Metroparks and Cuyahoga Valley National Park, all a short drive from downtown Cleveland.

https://www.google.com/search?q=clev...LePt0gGFuI37Cw

https://www.google.com/search?q=clev...w=1280&bih=703
 
Old 05-11-2012, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Maryland
4,266 posts, read 5,471,909 times
Reputation: 4591
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
So the cities or towns own the rights to the trails and they are public access? Ok, that wouldn't be that bad. I have been on many hiking trails through the Wisconsin Dells, as I recall a state park in that region. Of course I prefer the Northwoods and all of the trails up in Vilas and Oneida counties. I like mountain hiking the most and NH has a plethora of trails within the National Forest that I use or the Appalachian Trail. Wisconsin does have a fair amount of national forests and trails by Midwest standards, though.
Yeah, and I have to say that I grew up in central Illinois, and we went to city parks all the time. When it was spring/summer we'd go to the Shawnee Nat'l Forest in S. Illinois or Starved Rock State Park in N. central Illinois to do camping and hiking and whatnot. I even went to summer camp in the Shawnee. Sure, I didn't have a mountain out my back door, but even in the middle of cornfields, we lived in a house in wooded areas right near a river.
 
Old 05-11-2012, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,707,623 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
Yeah, and I have to say that I grew up in central Illinois, and we went to city parks all the time. When it was spring/summer we'd go to the Shawnee Nat'l Forest in S. Illinois or Starved Rock State Park in N. central Illinois to do camping and hiking and whatnot. I even went to summer camp in the Shawnee. Sure, I didn't have a mountain out my back door, but even in the middle of cornfields, we lived in a house in wooded areas right near a river.
Shawnee is beautiful!
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top