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Old 06-17-2009, 10:32 AM
 
5,721 posts, read 9,085,203 times
Reputation: 2460

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
See? That's the thing. They aren't from there.

Just out of curiosity, what stores are you shopping at and where are they in the city? I'll have to make a trip down there and see for myself.

Also, I'm originally from the Lansing, MI area, so there's no perceived bias on my part.

On an unrelated note, I have officially reached 1000 posts. Go Colts!!
I lived there in the mid 1990's. Not sure that any of those same people still work there today. Indy Cycle Sales is owned by a guy named Scott who's family is from TN. It's not on Ritter Ave. now and has since moved. Hardees, Marsh's Supermarket, Sams Club were just a few of the places I went to at that time. I worked at BMG music on the east side but apparently that facility has closed.

 
Old 06-17-2009, 01:07 PM
 
Location: St. Joseph Area
6,237 posts, read 8,461,586 times
Reputation: 3101
Quote:
Originally posted by michigan83
OK. The "generalization train" stops here.

I can't speak for Wisconsin, but rural Michigan is very conservative. You can't just look at the fact that it's a "blue state." Michigan has a lot of medium-sized urban areas that provide a ton of liberal votes. The rural areas are still very conservative, and aren't much different than rural Indiana or whatever. I grew up in rural Michigan. Trust me, there is nothing "progressive" about it. (Thank goodness, because that word actually makes me a little ill.)

The difference between Michigan and Indiana is that Michigan is less rural, not that the rural areas of Michigan aren't conservative. And I'm not sure what Northern European ancestry has to do with anything. The Dutch descendants in western Michigan are some of the most conservative people that you'll find anywhere in the U.S.
Boy, ain't THAT the truth! You're also right about Indiana and Michigan. Every time it goes Democrat it's by a close margin. We lean blue, but we're actually quite purple.
 
Old 06-17-2009, 01:20 PM
 
3,277 posts, read 4,613,972 times
Reputation: 1913
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milwaukee City View Post
why does the midwest get a bum rap.....Detroit.
Detroit doesn't have anything to do with people considering the Midwest generic.

And whoever said rural Michigan was anything but hard red obviously knows not what they speak.
 
Old 06-18-2009, 12:13 AM
 
Location: Midwest
1,005 posts, read 2,449,054 times
Reputation: 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by mackinac81 View Post
I've grown up in the midwest my whole life, but I often get the impression that people don't like it that much. It's not like I have a chip on my shoulder, but it seems like the midwest, overall is maligned more than other regions. We're the "rust belt", boring, with bumpkin-ish people, the land is boring etc...

So why does the Midwest get a bum rap from so many people--or is it just in my head?

mackinac
Rust belt, winters, fly over country ( most main cities are near the coast), maybe even sometimes politics.... all reasons many have given midwest a bad rep.


What does hard red mean?
 
Old 06-18-2009, 03:12 AM
 
Location: Spain
1,855 posts, read 4,287,813 times
Reputation: 943
I'm from the west coast and have spent significant time in the midwest. I can say that, in my experience, midwest cities like Cleveland, Columbus, and Louisville have nothing to offer that you can't get better on one of the coasts (granted, I've never been to Chicago which I hear is great).

As for geography, the west coast easily beats the midwest. Mountains + beaches > corn fields.

But having said that, I really do like visiting the midwest, people are very warm and there's a distinct feeling of normalcy in the area.
 
Old 06-18-2009, 03:46 AM
 
Location: City of Thorns
536 posts, read 1,949,006 times
Reputation: 272
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDX_LAX View Post
I'm from the west coast and have spent significant time in the midwest. I can say that, in my experience, midwest cities like Cleveland, Columbus, and Louisville have nothing to offer that you can't get better on one of the coasts (granted, I've never been to Chicago which I hear is great).

As for geography, the west coast easily beats the midwest. Mountains + beaches > corn fields.

But having said that, I really do like visiting the midwest, people are very warm and there's a distinct feeling of normalcy in the area.

There's just as many fields here in Oregon than a mid western state.

Personally, I prefer living on the west coast for personal reasons... but Im from Omaha, NE and never once did I experience "boring, lack of jobs, no scenery, no diversity.... blah blah blah" I think it's definitely preference, but you can't knock it until you try it. And I mean trying it, not passing through.
 
Old 06-18-2009, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
3,093 posts, read 4,134,076 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDX_LAX View Post
I'm from the west coast and have spent significant time in the midwest. I can say that, in my experience, midwest cities like Cleveland, Columbus, and Louisville have nothing to offer that you can't get better on one of the coasts (granted, I've never been to Chicago which I hear is great).

As for geography, the west coast easily beats the midwest. Mountains + beaches > corn fields.

But having said that, I really do like visiting the midwest, people are very warm and there's a distinct feeling of normalcy in the area.
Columbus has a wild and crazy College Football atmosphere that I promise you during football season is a better sports atmosphere than you will get anywhere on the West Coast or anywhere On the East Coast (Unless you count the southern atlantic states like Georgia and South Carolina as east coast which most people don't).
 
Old 06-18-2009, 06:39 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,900,535 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Huh?

I lived in Indy for a while and in fact I lived with a family from Tennessee. They seemed to speak with a southern accent. In fact I met a lot of people in the region that originally hailed from Kentucky and Tennessee but moved to the area for work. I heard plenty of my co workers speaking in a southern dialect when I was there and also while shopping in stores and going to restaurants.

Certainly Indiana is a Midwestern state but clearly a lot of people from the South have moved into some areas of the state, especially central Indiana and have been there for a generation or longer and in many cases they still speak with their original dialect.
You get a similar case with St. Louis usually too as well as Kansas City. Most people I've met around here that speak with a Southern accent are not natives to here, and I don't hear Southern dialect that often around here, Kansas City, and I've never heard a Southern accent in Indianapolis. Even if they are there, the simple fact they aren't natives to there shouldn't really change the natural boundaries of the dialect, because no natives in any of these places speak with one.
 
Old 06-18-2009, 06:41 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,900,535 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDX_LAX View Post
I'm from the west coast and have spent significant time in the midwest. I can say that, in my experience, midwest cities like Cleveland, Columbus, and Louisville have nothing to offer that you can't get better on one of the coasts (granted, I've never been to Chicago which I hear is great).

As for geography, the west coast easily beats the midwest. Mountains + beaches > corn fields.

But having said that, I really do like visiting the midwest, people are very warm and there's a distinct feeling of normalcy in the area.
Louisville is a Southern city, not a Midwestern one. It has far more in common with Nashville than with Cincinnati, Columbus, St. Louis, Indianapolis. Not to mention, Southern dialect is the native dialect to the area as is Southern culture and architecture.
 
Old 06-18-2009, 07:55 AM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,069,591 times
Reputation: 2275
Over 66 million people call the Midwest home. Since it's a free country, most of those 66 million could choose to live anywhere they want. I know people who are transplants to the Midwest. The number one reason I hear is quality of life, affordability, and it's a great place to raise a family. Of course, there are other great regions to raise a family as well. The Midwest happens to be one of them.
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