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View Poll Results: Accuracy of Southern Speech Map
Completely Accurate 5 6.49%
90%+ Accurate 33 42.86%
75%-90% Accurate 22 28.57%
Less than 75% Accurate 17 22.08%
Voters: 77. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-15-2009, 10:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeyserSoze View Post
Or Memphis. There are some transplants, but not enough to dilute the accent there, or amongst the younger citizens.
Well, the reason I chose such in Memphis and Greenville is because, well, I've spent some time in both regions, and if you're in the "right" area, you will see people who have little in the way of southern speech.

For Memphis, this would include some individuals in the eastern suburbs, namely Germantown, Cordova, and Bartlett.

For Greenville, this would include the eastern Greenville region near I-385.

I want to note that the majority of Memphis isn't in the green, nor is the majority of Greenville. Not even all of metro Atlanta is in the bright green, but rather about 75% of it, as places like Paulding County, Douglas County, Newton County, and parts of Coweta County are generally southern sounding amongst a large majority of the population.

I will admit, however, that Greenville and Memphis are not as diluted as Atlanta, Charlotte, and the Raleigh-Durham region.

With Nashville, there is an area of south/southwest Nashville near Vanderbilt University that is fairly diluted. Not so much for the rest of the metro.
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Old 06-15-2009, 10:58 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeyserSoze View Post
-There should be a little more yellow in Southern Maryland & the Eastern Shore(Lower Half in particular), and arguably far Western Maryland
-Gray should encompass a little more of Northeast Virginia
-The Cincinnati accent has always reminded me of the Baltimore one, but I can see why you put each respective area in its color scheme
Perhaps such could be the case with Maryland. Still, it's obviously more discernibly different than northern Virginia.
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Old 06-15-2009, 11:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubber_factory View Post
I think it is very accurate, I'm impressed.

I would not call it an Appalachian "Drawl/Twang", just a twang.

I like the concept of "Diluted Regions," but I would not consider Greenville or Columbia to be diluted. In NC I would just have the Charlotte CSA and the Raleigh-Durham CSA. The Piedmont Crescent (including the Triad) is not so thoroughly diluted, you still have some strong, twangy, piedmont accents outside the cities. I would add more dilution up and down the SC and NC coasts, but it can shift drastically as you move inland away from the beaches.

If I remember correctly, Florida's orange areas should be red like Georgia and LA.
You're correct in saying that the Piedmont Triad isn't as diluted as Charlotte and Raleigh-Durham. However, it's still diluted in areas of the triad, namely the Archdale and High Point areas, as well as some locations of Winston-Salem and Greensboro. Most of these areas, however, are overwhelmingly southern, I'll admit, but they have individualized areas that are diluted. It's still kind of hard to do such for a small area, so the map comes out looking like it did.

Yet, the diluted area from Gastonia to Charlotte to Concord to Kannapalis to parts of the Triad to parts of Burlington to the Raleigh-Durham area is fairly accurate.

With regard to the coasts, I tried to show the dilution for the outerbanks, Myrtle Beach, and some areas of Charleston. Savannah, on the other hand, has retained its southern speech in most residents, outside of some of the immediate historic areas.

Florida's orange areas are colored as such because the accent is generally a little less pronounced, and because there are fewer residents speaking with an identifiable southern accent, though it is still a relatively large majority.
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Old 06-15-2009, 11:04 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,908,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City Fanatic View Post
The reason I placed the accent line where I did in the states of Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio is because:

Illinois: In places such as Mt. Vernon and Carbondale, as various smaller towns, I didn't sense that much of a southern accent. If it was there, it was a faint southern accent. I did, however, notice the accent south of the I-57/I-24 merge. North of that, not so much.

With Missouri, even Kansas (eastern portion), I've heard southern accents farther north, up to around I-70, but they aren't in the majority (say, no more than 20% of the people I spoke with).
Indiana: I did notice the accent a little farter north in this state than Illinois, as shown on the map, but it wasn't that pronounced, if at all, beyond thirty or forty miles north of Louisville.

Ohio: I didn't notice the southern accent in the Cincinnati area, beyond a few individuals on the Ohio side, and a minority population on the Kentucky side. Only in southeastern Ohio did I sense a majority southern speaking population, and that was a very mild southern accent.
Yep, my sentiments exactly, CityFanatic. The farthest north I would extend the Southern speech map is in areas where dialect is significantly there. Most of Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio would fall well outside of this range. Being present and being the dominant dialect in my view are on of th the critical differences between Southern influence and truly Southern. St. Louis, Kansas City, Indianapolis, and Columbus are pretty much free of Southern speech patterns. It is rare I hear an accent with Southern influence other than from an African American around here.
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Old 06-15-2009, 11:11 AM
 
925 posts, read 2,292,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by treedonkey View Post
90% accurate IMO... How did you come up with the actual borders? Documented data or just gut feeeling based on personal experience?
Traveling, speaking with area residents.

Quote:
One thing... It would be a lot better if the legend in the map itself was more legible, so that I don;t have to bounce back and forth between your post and the map.
Click on the actual attachment. Click on it again. Then, expand the picture. It is legible, then.
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Old 06-15-2009, 12:33 PM
 
22,769 posts, read 26,225,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City Fanatic View Post
Florida's orange areas are colored as such because the accent is generally a little less pronounced, and because there are fewer residents speaking with an identifiable southern accent, though it is still a relatively large majority.
In my view, the shift from red to orange (or vice versa) is not an issue of strength or severity in the accent. The accents are fundamentally different; they come from a different blend of ethnic groups, who settled the different terrains for different reasons, and resulted in different speech patterns.

In my experience this shift can be easily mapped by looking at the % of African Americans in an area, which I think is the primary difference. Areas of the south where blacks are confined more to urban areas, will be more "orange". Areas of the south where blacks are the rural majority, will be more "red".
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Old 06-15-2009, 04:50 PM
 
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It extends much further west in a diluted fashion.

Of course, finding anyone with a native (rural) accent out West is a difficult challenge these days, due to the overwhelming influx of transplants from the midwest, NE and even those with "northern Western cowboy" accents ala Wyoming.

A specific example would be accents you show in the TX panhandle - a number of our early California accents are/were very similar to those.
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Old 06-15-2009, 06:16 PM
 
Location: 602/520
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Your map is very one-sided. If we are talking about the speech patterns of white Southerners, your map are accurate. However, there are plenty of black Southerners in Atlanta, Charlotte, Norfolk, Miami, Memphis, Tampa, Dallas, New Orleans, and Houston who have very thick southern accents. Before people claim that I am trying to wrongly inject race in this subject, it is does a huge disservice to the South and its people to completely ignore a massive segment of the people who inhabit the region.

For white Southerners: The Deep South accent should at least surround Atlanta, consume all of Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee, and a good majority of Arkansas, South Carolina, and North Carolina. In the Atlanta area, outside of I-285, southern accents reign. In the Charlotte area, outside of I-485, deep southern accents reign.

You should also have a shading for the Tidewater accent from coastal southern North Carolina to the southern part of the Delmarva Peninsula. Your map suggests that people in Tappahannock, Virginia have the same accent as people in Clovis, New Mexico. Very incorrect. You need to create several subgroups from that yellow shading.

Lastly, people well into southern Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio have southern drawls, your map needs to indicate that.
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Old 06-15-2009, 06:49 PM
 
Location: IN
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This is a very good map. I would extent the northern peripherial zone a little further to the north in Missouri, Indiana, and Ohio.
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Old 06-15-2009, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,571,893 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Your map is very one-sided. If we are talking about the speech patterns of white Southerners, your map are accurate. However, there are plenty of black Southerners in Atlanta, Charlotte, Norfolk, Miami, Memphis, Tampa, Dallas, New Orleans, and Houston who have very thick southern accents.
Many black people from Chicago, St. Louis, Cleveland, and Detroit have very thick southern accents, too. Location has little to do with accents among the black community.


Quote:
You should also have a shading for the Tidewater accent from coastal southern North Carolina to the southern part of the Delmarva Peninsula. Your map suggests that people in Tappahannock, Virginia have the same accent as people in Clovis, New Mexico. Very incorrect. You need to create several subgroups from that yellow shading.
You can split it up many times, but the map does a good job of telling the major differences. To me, all southern accents sound the same.

Quote:
Lastly, people well into southern Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio have southern drawls, your map needs to indicate that.
Exactly. Have you ever been to Dayton or Indianapolis? There is a definite southern accent in those cities. Many people from Indy say "Coke" for pop.
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