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View Poll Results: Accuracy of Southern Speech Map
Completely Accurate 5 6.49%
90%+ Accurate 33 42.86%
75%-90% Accurate 22 28.57%
Less than 75% Accurate 17 22.08%
Voters: 77. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-15-2009, 06:54 PM
 
542 posts, read 1,289,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Your map is very one-sided. If we are talking about the speech patterns of white Southerners, your map are accurate. However, there are plenty of black Southerners in Atlanta, Charlotte, Norfolk, Miami, Memphis, Tampa, Dallas, New Orleans, and Houston who have very thick southern accents. Before people claim that I am trying to wrongly inject race in this subject, it is does a huge disservice to the South and its people to completely ignore a massive segment of the people who inhabit the region.
Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Lastly, people well into southern Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio have southern drawls, your map needs to indicate that.
Definitely. Pockets of Southern speech definitely exist outside of states that could be considered Southern to some degree. There are blacks from Chicago that sound like they're from Memphis, or Mississippi. Or a place like Oakland, though heavily influenced by California English, there appears to be a slight Southern influence, as well.
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Old 06-15-2009, 07:00 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,691,014 times
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I think my area has more of the orange style and less of the red style accent-regular southern vs. deep south drawl. Sorry, but I don't hear the same accent here in NW La that I hear in Miss and maybe eastern La. I travel daily between the two regions and that is why I note this.
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Old 06-15-2009, 07:28 PM
 
2,248 posts, read 6,210,316 times
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I'd say this map is generally accurate, 75 to 90 percent.

I think some of you are confused about simply the presence of an accent vs a predominant accent. For example, the Southern accent generally ends at or near the Ohio River, so it is possible to hear Southern sounding accents north of that and/or Northern sounding accents south of that. Doesn't mean it's the predominant type, though.

This can also apply to any subregion of the Southern United States.
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Old 06-16-2009, 06:02 AM
 
925 posts, read 2,292,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Your map is very one-sided. If we are talking about the speech patterns of white Southerners, your map are accurate. However, there are plenty of black Southerners in Atlanta, Charlotte, Norfolk, Miami, Memphis, Tampa, Dallas, New Orleans, and Houston who have very thick southern accents. Before people claim that I am trying to wrongly inject race in this subject, it is does a huge disservice to the South and its people to completely ignore a massive segment of the people who inhabit the region.
While it is true that blacks as a percentage are more prone to having thicker accents, as most blacks were originally from the South, even those who are "transplants", it doesn't take from the fact that the diluted regions are still diluted. With areas not classified as diluted, it is not affected at all, so I don't see what your beef is.

Quote:
For white Southerners: The Deep South accent should at least surround Atlanta, consume all of Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee, and a good majority of Arkansas, South Carolina, and North Carolina.
The so-called deep south accent is a low country accent, and it doesn't extend into Tennessee, the northern half of Georgia, most of North Carolina, northern Alabama, half of South Carolina, or most of Arkansas.

I attended college in south Georgia, and there is a definite difference in speech patterns between those in the low country and those at higher elevations.

I've lived in the south my entire life. Have you?

Quote:
In the Atlanta area, outside of I-285, southern accents reign. In the Charlotte area, outside of I-485, deep southern accents reign.
That still take away from the fact that the areas are diluted. Yes, southern accents are most common in the Atlanta and Charlotte areas. Being diluted doesn't mean that the southern accent doesn't exist, or isn't the majority, it only means that there isn't a majority population speaking with one particular accent or even southern accent. Younger adults and those younger in these regions tend to have a much milder southern accent than those who are older. That is, if they are native to the area. Transplants and their children tend to not have an accent at all, albeit sometimes their children do pick up some common patterns of southern speech, or sayings.

Quote:
You should also have a shading for the Tidewater accent from coastal southern North Carolina to the southern part of the Delmarva Peninsula. Your map suggests that people in Tappahannock, Virginia have the same accent as people in Clovis, New Mexico.
Coastal southern North Carolina has isolated areas of dilution, not a mild southern accent. Green vs. yellow.

Quote:
Lastly, people well into southern Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio have southern drawls, your map needs to indicate that.
A minority population well into southern Illinois has a drawl, however, most people do not. I've traveled all throughout southern Illinois, and the southern accent isn't that profound, if at all, throughout much of the region. South of the I-57/I-24 split, I agree. North of it, not so much.
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Old 06-16-2009, 06:17 AM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,278,768 times
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I've never been under the impression that a person's accent is influenced by race...in my world, people from the same area are likely to have a similar accent - no matter what their race may be.
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Old 06-16-2009, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, Louisiana
4,388 posts, read 3,151,497 times
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It's an interesting map but I would extend the French influenced accent to include all of the region called Acadiana in the map below.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1f/Louisiana_regions_map.svg/225px- (broken link)

I have relatives in the northernmost parish of Acadiana, Avoyelles Parish, and most people from there have noticeable French accents.

Last edited by ral31; 06-16-2009 at 09:59 AM..
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Old 06-16-2009, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,958,696 times
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I think there needs to be more orange in Kentucky, at least South of Bullitt County, and points farther South.
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Old 06-16-2009, 12:16 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,154,879 times
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The accent in West Texas depicted as "Western" is a different accent than one would hear in Wyoming. What you call the "Western" accent is actually an older form of an Appalachian or Upper Southern accent. In other words, it is of a Scots Irish origin. This is actually the "typical" accent throughout the Southwest among native born rural folk (and the rare urbanite such as myself). Of course as I noted, the dilution factor en masse is immense due to the in migration of people from Northern and Northeastern places over the past 100 years.
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Old 06-16-2009, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Western Hoosierland
18,264 posts, read 7,280,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Synopsis View Post
Interesting map city. Thanks for posting. I think it's pretty accurate myself.

I agree
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Old 06-16-2009, 12:35 PM
 
22,769 posts, read 26,229,736 times
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^I agree with this Bayareahillbilly

On vacation in Texas a few years ago, around Dallas and Austin particularly, I noticed that people spoke like they were from east Tennessee or western North Carolina.
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