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View Poll Results: Accuracy of Southern Speech Map
Completely Accurate 5 6.49%
90%+ Accurate 33 42.86%
75%-90% Accurate 22 28.57%
Less than 75% Accurate 17 22.08%
Voters: 77. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-19-2009, 09:14 AM
 
22,769 posts, read 26,222,576 times
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To me,
noontime was "lunch", evening was "dinner"

To my grandparents,
noontime was "dinner", evening was "supper"

This has consistently caused some confusion over the years between us.. and is probably why we call it "Thanksgiving Dinner", but eat around noon.
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Old 06-19-2009, 11:00 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,907,044 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
Very interesting sub-topic on it all, CF!

I grew up calling the three meals of the day breakfast, dinner, supper. But nowdays, I very often say breakfast, lunch, and supper just because it has grown on me and -- being a teacher -- I find many younger people don't even know exactly what I mean when I say "dinner" at mid-day! LOL

I will still often still use "dinner" for the noonday meal, but at the same time, anymore (*sighs with regret*) I use "lunch" with increasing and disturbing frequency!

I suppose that just as has the mass-media culture and chain fast food diluted the use of regional terms such as "po'boy" (Southern) and hoagie (generally Midwest) and "grinder" (Northeast) into a more widespread national use of "sub"? So has (starting, I think, with the federal school lunch program) "lunch" replaced dinner in popular use in Texas/South, as well as other rural areas where, theretofore, "dinner" was commonly used.

*grins a bit in remembering* A couple of years back, at "lunch time" I told my classroom aide, that I was going to go home and "eat dinner". One of my students asked if I meant "lunch".

I was a bit taken aback as the mistranslation in generations was something I hadn't thought of before. Anyway, when I explained somewhat, the kid told me something like "Dont worry, Mr. ***, my grandmother still calls lunch dinner" Oh man..!
Nobody in the Midwest calls it a "hoagie" usually...the term hoagie is used commonly around Philadelphia...it is rarely heard around the Midwest.
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Old 06-19-2009, 12:19 PM
 
30 posts, read 144,269 times
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Default More southern speech maps

More maps





http://i682.photobucket.com/albums/vv187/NativeVirginian/accent.jpg (broken link)


http://i682.photobucket.com/albums/vv187/NativeVirginian/accent4.jpg (broken link)


http://i682.photobucket.com/albums/vv187/NativeVirginian/accent3.jpg (broken link)
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Old 06-19-2009, 12:29 PM
 
767 posts, read 1,828,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWestVirginianBlumpkin View Post
More maps










Re: the you, you all, etc. Alot of the old timers in the upper Midwest say "youse guys". That's one more variation.
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Old 06-19-2009, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,570,502 times
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Michigan is Upper Midwest? Maybe geographically, but we don't have the accent. Michiganders, except those from the U.P., don't sound like people from Fargo.
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Old 06-19-2009, 01:12 PM
 
542 posts, read 1,288,936 times
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I don't agree with some of those designations. It just seems more like grouping states or regions together under certain preconceived cultural similarities rather than speech patterns.
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Old 06-19-2009, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,341 posts, read 14,104,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWestVirginianBlumpkin View Post
More maps

Regarding your first map............. I can count on one hand the number of times I heard a Kentuckian say "you all."

Kentuckian is straight "y'all" country. I know this because I cringed each time.
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Old 06-19-2009, 04:10 PM
 
767 posts, read 1,828,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kazoopilot View Post
Michigan is Upper Midwest? Maybe geographically, but we don't have the accent. Michiganders, except those from the U.P., don't sound like people from Fargo.
I said alot of the old timers in the Upper Midwest talk like that. I didn't say that everyone did. Whether your part of Michigan should be considered Upper Midwest and/or whether or not you have "the accent" has nothing to do with what I am saying. I am simply stating a fact based on the time that I have spent in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and, yes, the UP. "youse guys" is a fairly prevalent way of addressing people there.
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Old 06-19-2009, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,638 posts, read 27,069,277 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeyserSoze View Post
I don't agree with some of those designations. It just seems more like grouping states or regions together under certain preconceived cultural similarities rather than speech patterns.
That's how I took it as well.
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Old 06-19-2009, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,687,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWestVirginianBlumpkin View Post
More maps










The "ya'll" phenomenon is catching on as well outside the labeled parts.
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