U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Accuracy of Southern Speech Map
Completely Accurate 5 6.49%
90%+ Accurate 33 42.86%
75%-90% Accurate 22 28.57%
Less than 75% Accurate 17 22.08%
Voters: 77. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-26-2009, 01:28 PM
 
36 posts, read 110,763 times
Reputation: 37

Advertisements

Honey, Mobile, Alabama needs to be RED...................................Yaul come on down and see us sometime.........................Bless your little old heart..you did a fine job...Bet you fell in love with Southerns when you were visiting...............................
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-26-2009, 01:37 PM
 
36 posts, read 110,763 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toxic Toast View Post
Regarding your first map............. I can count on one hand the number of times I heard a Kentuckian say "you all."

Kentuckian is straight "y'all" country. I know this because I cringed each time.
WEll if it makes you cringe..........move.............................. .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2010, 09:31 PM
 
73 posts, read 147,578 times
Reputation: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Fanatic View Post
Here is the map of Southern Speech that I constructed. It is based on my travels all across the south, as well as my trips to every state within the U.S.

I've seen a lot of maps before, and I've felt that they do not do justice to the realities of the south.

Anyhow, here is the map.

Brownish-Red/Burnt Sienna: Appalachian Twang/Drawl: Strongest identifiable southern speech.

Red: Deep South Drawl: Second strongest most identifiable southern speech.

Orange: Medium Southern Accent: The typical southern accent. Not as strong as the Appalachian Twang or Deep Southern Drawl.

Yellow: Upper South southern accent: A mild southern accent. Typical or the upper regions of the south.

Bright Green: Diluted Regions: Areas where transplants have settled in great numbers, to the point where many people (transplants) do not have an identifiable southern accent, or where native older adults speak with a strong southern accent, whereby the influence of the transplants have weakened the accent of the native younger adult and teen population to a mild southern accent.

Purple: French-Influenced Southern Speech and/or Cajun.

Olive: Southern speech with an interspersed large population of Spanish speakers.

Blue: Western Speech/No Discernible Southern Speech with an interspersed large population of Spanish Speakers.

Light Blue: Population consist primarily of Spanish Speaking residents with a majority who can also speak English. No discernible southern speech outside of a small minority.

Gray: No Discernible Southern Speech.




So tell me, how accurate is it?

Attachment 43447
just one word NO
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2010, 05:48 PM
 
Location: the future
1,819 posts, read 3,439,088 times
Reputation: 842
Default boredatwork

This isnt too accurate to me...southern maryland and around D.C has a southern drawl with a northern speech .....everybody from the north acts like MD is the south...everyobdy from the south acts like Md is the north some yankees.....We'll say "maw" for mall...."Murland" for Maryland...."ryde" for ride."mova" for mother..."fava" for father..etc.....hard to explain I dont see it but ppl always we sound country to out of towners from up north
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2010, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Southeast Arizona
3,191 posts, read 4,138,311 times
Reputation: 2108
From what I know, the Texas variant of the accent is somewhat apparent in western New Mexico (around the Roswell and Hobbs region).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2010, 06:19 PM
 
Location: moving again
4,382 posts, read 15,327,934 times
Reputation: 1594
Quote:
Originally Posted by boreatwork View Post
This isnt too accurate to me...southern maryland and around D.C has a southern drawl with a northern speech .....everybody from the north acts like MD is the south...everyobdy from the south acts like Md is the north some yankees.....We'll say "maw" for mall...."Murland" for Maryland...."ryde" for ride."mova" for mother..."fava" for father..etc.....hard to explain I dont see it but ppl always we sound country to out of towners from up north
No, we don't. I don't say Maw I say mawl. I don't say Murland, i say mair-uh-lin. I say ride. Mother for mother, father for tather. Please, Maryland is too diverse to say we all say this or that. Maybe you southern Marylanders do, but Montgomery, Howard, Frederick, Gherett, carol, etc etc couties don't speak in the manner you presented. Furthermore, the map is wrong in that it includes northern states.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2010, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Little Rock, Arkansas
65 posts, read 271,322 times
Reputation: 64
Little Rock should be bright green. Arkansas' Capitol City has a very diverse population which includes transplants in the medical community and information/data technology businesses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2010, 12:44 PM
 
Location: the future
1,819 posts, read 3,439,088 times
Reputation: 842
Default boredatwork

Quote:
Originally Posted by Billiam View Post
No, we don't. I don't say Maw I say mawl. I don't say Murland, i say mair-uh-lin. I say ride. Mother for mother, father for tather. Please, Maryland is too diverse to say we all say this or that. Maybe you southern Marylanders do, but Montgomery, Howard, Frederick, Gherett, carol, etc etc couties don't speak in the manner you presented. Furthermore, the map is wrong in that it includes northern states.

Which is why I specifically said around the D.C suburbs bc that what I know .....I dont know about your part of MD
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2010, 05:42 PM
 
871 posts, read 1,958,184 times
Reputation: 596
this really isnt accurate. the southern dialect simply doesnt work that way. the idea that the deeper south you go, the "stronger" it gets is a myth. accents in rural western kentucky are not less strong than those in rural louisiana. youd find some differences, but they arent more or less strong in the sense that neither are closer than the other to "broadcaster" type general american.

in reality, there is not one southern accent that simply varies in strength depending on how deep into the south you are, but simply different types of southern dialects in different parts of the south.

the yellow part of this map is least accurate. that is not a dialect region, as there are at least 3 variations of southern dialect across it.

just to give an example of what im talking about, heres ernie brown jr from lebanon ky (yellow on the map) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gn8EQ0azXpQ
and heres art williams from cairo georgia (red on the map)
YouTube - Art Williams - Do It - part 1 of 2
i dont see one as "mild" and the other as "strong", because niether sound like general american english. it shows that strength can often depend on whos talking, not the region.

the only true "mild" regions are parts of the lower midwest where the accent does not predominate, and in cities where it is dying. even then those will be mild versions of different accents. Mild or strong accents can easily be found within the same town, and are examples of the same dialect being more "general american", which happens for varying reasons

Last edited by JimmyJohnWilson; 04-22-2010 at 05:56 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2010, 08:22 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,589,354 times
Reputation: 1934
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Fanatic View Post
Here is the map of Southern Speech that I constructed. It is based on my travels all across the south, as well as my trips to every state within the U.S.

I've seen a lot of maps before, and I've felt that they do not do justice to the realities of the south.

Anyhow, here is the map.

Brownish-Red/Burnt Sienna: Appalachian Twang/Drawl: Strongest identifiable southern speech.

Red: Deep South Drawl: Second strongest most identifiable southern speech.

Orange: Medium Southern Accent: The typical southern accent. Not as strong as the Appalachian Twang or Deep Southern Drawl.

Yellow: Upper South southern accent: A mild southern accent. Typical or the upper regions of the south.

Bright Green: Diluted Regions: Areas where transplants have settled in great numbers, to the point where many people (transplants) do not have an identifiable southern accent, or where native older adults speak with a strong southern accent, whereby the influence of the transplants have weakened the accent of the native younger adult and teen population to a mild southern accent.

Purple: French-Influenced Southern Speech and/or Cajun.

Olive: Southern speech with an interspersed large population of Spanish speakers.

Blue: Western Speech/No Discernible Southern Speech with an interspersed large population of Spanish Speakers.

Light Blue: Population consist primarily of Spanish Speaking residents with a majority who can also speak English. No discernible southern speech outside of a small minority.

Gray: No Discernible Southern Speech.




So tell me, how accurate is it?

Attachment 43447
as far as the bright green areas go, only those young adults raised around a lot of transplants will have dilluted accents

this is why it's so popular to say that cities like dallas, houston, and atlanta have no accent or aren't really southern. but that's not true at all. you just have to hang around the right places
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top