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Old 06-17-2009, 02:39 AM
 
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I'm considering moving from the SF Bay Area to New England. I am looking for older, compact, relatively affordable and dense cities in New England. So far, I am considering Providence, Portland, and the burbs of Boston. Any other suggestions?
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Old 06-17-2009, 03:17 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
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Portland wins hands down. I was stationed in RI back in my Navy days. Portland is paradise compared to the other two. It is the most liberal town in Maine and would ease the transition from SF.
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Old 06-17-2009, 03:20 AM
 
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What else sets Portland apart from other cities in New England? One possible drawback that I can think of is its smallness.
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Old 06-17-2009, 04:27 AM
 
Location: Central Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jzt83 View Post
I'm considering moving from the SF Bay Area to New England. I am looking for older, compact, relatively affordable and dense cities in New England. So far, I am considering Providence, Portland, and the burbs of Boston. Any other suggestions?
I'm not sure I'd call Portland a "dense city." It depends on what you are looking for really. Providence is culturally more like SF, but Boston is a dense city that has a New England flavor. Portland is a less-dense city that has a Boston feel since most people there come from Massachusetts.
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Old 06-17-2009, 04:31 AM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
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Bristol, Connecticut is listed as having a below average cost of living index.

http://www.city-data.com/city/Bristol-Connecticut.html

The crime rate is listed as below average.

Portland, Maine is classed as about average in cost of living.

http://www.city-data.com/city/Portland-Maine.html

Cranston, Rhode Island's cost of living is placed as slightly below average.

http://www.city-data.com/city/Cranst...de-Island.html

Warwick, Rhode Island's is also below average.

http://www.city-data.com/city/Warwick-Rhode-Island.html

Don't know how liveable these places are of if you'd deem them big enough.

Last edited by Thomas R.; 06-17-2009 at 04:37 AM.. Reason: tried to take out ones with more poverty.
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Old 06-17-2009, 04:48 AM
 
373 posts, read 1,070,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bangorme View Post
I'm not sure I'd call Portland a "dense city." It depends on what you are looking for really. Providence is culturally more like SF, but Boston is a dense city that has a New England flavor. Portland is a less-dense city that has a Boston feel since most people there come from Massachusetts.
I am looking for something more like Boston but with a lower cost of living. I prefer cities lots of older well-preserved buildings that are walkable and densely populated. Portland sounds too small. What are some walkable and bustling neighborhoods in Providence?
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Old 06-17-2009, 07:59 AM
 
Location: where my heart is
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Yes, Portland is very nice.
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Old 06-17-2009, 08:07 AM
 
Location: New York City
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Providence is by far the most Boston-esque city in New England, college town, old architecture, near the ocean. It also has commuter train service into Boston, and direct Amtrak service to NYC. Providence has been hit very badly by the recession and has one of the highest unemployment rates in the country. You might get a deal on a house/apartment however.

Another option might be Worcester, MA. It's a city that few people have heard of and fewer know how to pronounce (it's Wooster, or Woostah if you're a local). It's the second largest city in New England only an hour west of Boston. The also have commuter train service. It's far more urban than the burbs of Boston, which can be really posh and deciduous (like Brookline, Weston, Concord), but it's not as urban as Boston.

Portland is a charming town, but it's small and comparatively remote. Providence is 50 miles from Boston, Portland is 100. Not a lot by California standards, but far for New England.

Portsmouth, New Hampshire is a very cute (if a bit precious) colonial town. It's much smaller than the others but is very walkable and has an interesting arts scene. Gloucester, MA and Mystic, RI are similar.

The job market is very different in each of these places, which could make a big difference in your decision. It sounds like you need to do a road trip. I love driving around New England, especially in the summer.
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Old 06-17-2009, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Lawton, OK
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Given the obvious choice of the Boston metro....I would recommend:

Burlington, VT-Small city at 40,000 people, but it's very walkable and the population density is high with the city only covering about 16 square miles (which makes it just as crowded as some cities 5 times it's size). Burlington is sandwiched in between lake Champlain and the green mtns, so as far as scenery goes, you can't beat it.

If Burlington is too small, might I suggest Bridgeport, CT. Similar to Burlington in land area but has 100,000 more people.

If those two are a no-go the Boston metro area might fit nice.
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Old 06-17-2009, 09:46 AM
 
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You may also want to look into the New London, CT area. While New London only has 25,000 people packed into a few square miles it is also adjacent to Groton and Waterford which have around 40,000 and 20,000 people respectively. Those three communities are basically intertwined at least economically and bring the population close to 100,000 people. You can drive to New Haven or Providence in about an hour.
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