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Old 06-17-2009, 11:05 PM
 
Location: OKLAHOMA CITY
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their own stand alone city at one time, but over time they and the larger city melded into each other.
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Old 06-17-2009, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Chicago metro
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In Chicago, many of us suburbanites sometimes identify with the city. Many suburban people work in the central business districts in the city and feel a close connection to the big city. The exurbs are more of there own city, but they are still suburbs and included in the MSA population.
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Old 06-18-2009, 11:14 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pw72 View Post
I've never liked that answer, but in this discussion, it is so true. It depends.

There are suburbs around the country that have become their own cities. I would use Bellevue, WA as a prime example. Once a bedroom community across Lake Washington from Seattle, now is a business center and a hub for the "eastside" of Seattle, an area where the population is closing in on equalling Seattle proper. It's skyline is impressive, (while not quite on the scale of Seattle), but probably equalling Portland or Sacramento!
Then there are cities that developed in the shadows of other cities in an almost comepletely independent fashion, with their own economies and institutions, but today are considered parts of metropolitan areas and deemed by some as "suburbs". I am talking about places like Newark, Gary, Trenton, East St. Louis, Long Beach, Decatur, Marietta, Camden, Cambridge, Lackawanna, Holyoke, Council Bluffs, etc.
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Old 06-18-2009, 01:05 PM
 
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The reason a vast majority of the suburbs have the population, skyline and size that they do today directly related to being near the core city and all the other suburbs.

If the others didn't exist, neither would the suburb, at least in its present form.

I think if you're talking the size of a "city" in comparison to opportunities or population, you need to include the entire urban area. City limits can be extremely random. You can have San Fran with 49 square miles, or Houston with 600 square miles. You can't just compare those two cities and get a real feel for them. Obviously you need to look at the millions and millions of people who live directly connected onto the main cities in the suburbs. Those people are a huge part of why the central city is what it is today.
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Old 06-18-2009, 07:19 PM
 
56,565 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Then there are cities that developed in the shadows of other cities in an almost comepletely independent fashion, with their own economies and institutions, but today are considered parts of metropolitan areas and deemed by some as "suburbs". I am talking about places like Newark, Gary, Trenton, East St. Louis, Long Beach, Decatur, Marietta, Camden, Cambridge, Lackawanna, Holyoke, Council Bluffs, etc.
Great examples of blue collar suburbs or what were called "satellite cities" that are considered suburbs, but in many cases could or might be smaller city centers if they weren't connected to a larger city. Some others that come to mind that might fit the bill are: Steelton, Chester, Dearborn, Dundalk, Towson, Alexandria, Arlington, Covington, Jeffersonville and New Albany, East Providence, Rensselaer and Aurora, among others.
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Old 06-18-2009, 09:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
The reason a vast majority of the suburbs have the population, skyline and size that they do today directly related to being near the core city and all the other suburbs.

If the others didn't exist, neither would the suburb, at least in its present form.

I think if you're talking the size of a "city" in comparison to opportunities or population, you need to include the entire urban area. City limits can be extremely random. You can have San Fran with 49 square miles, or Houston with 600 square miles. You can't just compare those two cities and get a real feel for them. Obviously you need to look at the millions and millions of people who live directly connected onto the main cities in the suburbs. Those people are a huge part of why the central city is what it is today.
Yes, you have hit on a key truth. Many edge city type suburbs that insist they are NOT suburbs anymore, would not be there if not for the core city. I think this fact needs to be remembered as a componet of whether or not suburbs are indeed their "own" cities.
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Old 06-19-2009, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Chicago- Lawrence and Kedzie/Maywood
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There's two types of suburbs. Those suburbs that are close to the city with civilization along the way to the core city itself.
Then there are those suburbs that are far out and you have to go through roads where there is only grass along the way.

Example:
Lombard, IL: There will always be houses and humans along the way to Chicago.

Aurora, IL: You have to pass through a big gap of nothingness before you reach some humans again.
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