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Old 06-18-2009, 01:11 PM
 
925 posts, read 2,293,682 times
Reputation: 529

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
What kind of drugs were you taking when you wrote that?

I'm in no way a religious person, so I NEVER have any Holy Days.

I do take advantage of not working on Holidays though, which are not Holy Days....they're HOLIDAYS. A Holiday can be a Holy Day, but it obviously doesn't have to be.

Holiday - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Likewise I also take advantage of the 3 weeks of vacation given to me by my company. I normally take a few days off at a time and either travel, or relax at home.

What's the point of this thread?
The etymology of the word does relate to "holy days". I'm fully aware that "holidays" are often secular in nature these days, nor was such my argument. My argument was the context in which an Englishman used the word. He used it in the context of going on a trip, and such was my contention.

It sounds innapropriate, in my opinion, and it isn't typical of what is heard here in the U.S. It's been pointed out that the Brits speak in such a fashion, to which I was unaware, so let's give this a rest.
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Old 06-18-2009, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,397 posts, read 55,240,452 times
Reputation: 15490
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Fanatic View Post
Am I incorrect in saying that holiday mean "Holy Day"?

Can you go on a holy day, any more than you can go on a Monday?

You can go on a trip on a Monday or a Holy Day, but there isn't anything tangible in saying you're going on a Holy Day? It's like saying, I'm going on Christmas or Easter. The "on" part is relating to something you're doing on the day, not the day itself.

By the way, if you want to speak incorrectly, and support fallacious speech arguments, then go right ahead.
You dont need to be so anal about this.

People in the UK say "holiday" to mean "vacation."

So what? Why do you care so much?
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Old 06-18-2009, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Bray, Ireland
105 posts, read 120,566 times
Reputation: 60
Vaccation = American and Canadian
Holiday = Irish/British/English Speaking Europeans.

They both have the exact same meaning, to take a leave of absence or to travel somewhere.

Holiday can also be interpreted as a holy day, as the word Holiday is in fact derived from Holy Day. But its meaning has changed over the years.

The word gay used to mean happy and joyful, it now means homosexual. It too has evolved.
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Old 06-18-2009, 01:47 PM
 
2,437 posts, read 7,291,732 times
Reputation: 1512
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Fanatic View Post
It sounds innapropriate, in my opinion, and it isn't typical of what is heard here in the U.S. It's been pointed out that the Brits speak in such a fashion, to which I was unaware, so let's give this a rest.
Well, now that you've told us that you just did not know that 'holiday' is the word that brits use for what we would call 'vacation', then we can indeed give it a rest, given that you do not push the matter further yourself.
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Old 06-18-2009, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Vero Beach, Fl
2,949 posts, read 12,188,182 times
Reputation: 2076
Here's another one. In the US when some gets angry they say they are "mad", in the UK and most other parts of the world, when someone is angry, they use the word "angry" to express their emotion.

I enjoy poking fun at Americans (from north America) who say they are "mad" and my response -- I didn't know you were insane.
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Old 06-18-2009, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Colorado
4,308 posts, read 11,819,054 times
Reputation: 4425
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhlcomp View Post
Here's another one. In the US when some gets angry they say they are "mad", in the UK and most other parts of the world, when someone is angry, they use the word "angry" to express their emotion.

I enjoy poking fun at Americans (from north America) who say they are "mad" and my response -- I didn't know you were insane.
Well, to continue this thread, in the US when someone is annoyed they are "p***ed" whilst in the UK when someone is drunk they are "p***ed". When a Brit is annoyed, they are "p***ed off". It's important to understand these subtle cultural differences
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Old 06-18-2009, 04:37 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,221 posts, read 23,725,878 times
Reputation: 11662
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Fanatic View Post
I didn't start this thread.

I responded to a comment in another thread, and so many people made an issue of it, that the moderator created this thread for others to carry on the conversation.
Sweet, more exposure means more laughs for everyone.
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Old 06-18-2009, 04:38 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,701 posts, read 74,699,564 times
Reputation: 48232
we do its called disability.
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
657 posts, read 1,312,420 times
Reputation: 504
city fanatic -

do you say good bye to people upon departure? you do realize that you're saying "god be with ye". but what if you just shorten it to "bye"? what if that departing person is an atheist? what if you are?
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Old 06-18-2009, 07:55 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,141 posts, read 9,925,452 times
Reputation: 6429
I am going to take a guess on this. Historically the British were the first to go through the industrial revolution. The working people, formerly from rural areas and small towns crowded into cities under horrible conditions and literally worked their life away 24/7. This was before the safety net, unions and things we take for granted like a 40 work week --- so for some working class people the only time they ever had off was a half day on Sunday and on HOLIDAYS. So people started thinking of Holidays the way we think of mini vacations here in North America.
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