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Old 06-27-2009, 01:04 PM
 
Location: SC
1,141 posts, read 3,152,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
It was an interesting map, I'd never seen it before. I'd always heard of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania as the Amish hub but I guess not. Using the map, and other resources, Holmes County, Ohio is the most Amish county. Followed by those two counties in Indiana. (Lagrange County, Indiana and I forget the other)

However the map seems to be about "Old Order Amish." I don't know if the more liberal "Beechy Amish" have the same distribution or a slightly different one. Also some people mix up the Amish with the Mennonites and the Hutterites. Mennonites are fairly common in Kansas and might be in Colorado too. They don't reject technology so much, but many of them do value plain-dress and they are pacifist Christians. In the US Hutterite colonies, from what I can tell, are most numerous in South Dakota and Montana. Although some are also in North Dakota, Washington, Minnesota, and one colony in Oregon. Of those the Dakotas and Oregon don't seem to have any Old Order Amish. Hutterites live in communal colonies of about 200. They dress more colorfully than the Amish, and allow a bit more technology than them, but I think are generally stricter than today's Mennonites. Unlike the Amish the Hutterites I'm pretty sure don't practice shunning as I believe there are ex-Hutterites who still chat with people in the colonies.
Yeah..uh that map threw me. As far as I know the largest (REAL) Amish communties in the US are in Ohio, Dover, Sugarcreek etc 3 counties of them.
Then right above Canton Ohio, in and around Uniontown is a huge population of Mennonites.
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Old 06-27-2009, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Midwest
1,005 posts, read 2,450,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Just curious, why do you think there would be a lot of Amish in Colorado? CO is not a farm state; it's more a ranching state. The "carrying capacity" of the arid land does not allow for a lot of this "off the grid" living that the Amish do. There is a thread on the CO forum about Amish moving to CO, but it hasn't happened in any appreciable numbers, and the living isn't going to be as easy as in the NE and midwest.



Here is a Mennoonite map. It is from 2000, so the data might be a little different now. Again, I don't know why anyone would think there would be a preponderance of Mennonites in CO.
http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo.../mennonite.gif

Here is an Amish distribution map by the above source.
http://www.valpo.edu/geomet/pics/geo...gion/amish.gif
I thought there was a few cases on the media dealing with the Amish population, and I remember a few mentioning on tv that there is a large Amish population in that area, speaking of Colorado. I think one was about a priest, another near Bailey, Colorado.
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Old 06-27-2009, 11:09 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
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There is a thread on the Colorado forum about CO being the next place the Amish are thinking of moving. However, IMO, it will be hard to live their lifestyle in CO. As I said previously, it's not particularly a farming state; the agriculture runs more to ranching. It's arid and you need huge spreads to get a decent harvest. I don't know if their religion would permit irrigation. In the mountain areas, the growing season is too short for most crops.
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Old 06-27-2009, 11:42 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,969,835 times
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Maybe they could try South Dakota or Oregon instead. Those two states both have a good Mennonite population and both have at least one Hutterite colony with South Dakota having several. So if those two groups can make it there maybe Amish can.

South Dakota also has a large American Indian population, tying the two things together. Well sort of.
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Old 06-28-2009, 06:06 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,512 posts, read 17,740,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
There is a thread on the Colorado forum about CO being the next place the Amish are thinking of moving. However, IMO, it will be hard to live their lifestyle in CO. As I said previously, it's not particularly a farming state; the agriculture runs more to ranching. It's arid and you need huge spreads to get a decent harvest. I don't know if their religion would permit irrigation. In the mountain areas, the growing season is too short for most crops.
Why not? Building a decent buggy wheel is a far more sophisticated craft than gravity based irrigation (which, at any rate, is common in New Mexico).

The Amish are a supremely practical people. I doubt they would move to Colorado without adapting to local agricultural practices. So if the Amish move to ranching country, maybe they will, gee, I dunno, raise cattle?


ABQConvict
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Old 06-28-2009, 06:14 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Why not? Building a decent buggy wheel is a far more sophisticated craft than gravity based irrigation (which, at any rate, is common in New Mexico).

The Amish are a supremely practical people. I doubt they would move to Colorado without adapting to local agricultural practices. So if the Amish move to ranching country, maybe they will, gee, I dunno, raise cattle?


ABQConvict
I grew up in Pennsylvania near an Amish settlement. They like to grow their own food. They also have huge families. It's hard to "subsistence farm" in CO. There's a lot that won't grow here. Since they only go to school through grade 8, and they are very insular, I'd bet they don't know a lot about farming/ranching in CO.
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Old 06-28-2009, 06:24 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Amish Heading Westward- To Colorado
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Old 06-29-2009, 03:14 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,512 posts, read 17,740,343 times
Reputation: 30801
I live in New Mexico and I can tell you there are subsistence farmers here. I myself grow a decent garden (enough for 4 people for half the year on a standard suburban plot < 1/16th acre). Are you trying to tell me that farming is easier in New Mexico than Colorado?

If Mennonites can make it in the Chihuahuan desert of Mexico, then I bet the Amish can figure out how to survive in Colorado. I don't see why the Amish would be incapable of starting a dairy or meat ranch. Do you assume they are stupid or is it something you know?


ABQConvict
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Old 06-29-2009, 03:42 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,969,835 times
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http://www2.etown.edu/amishstudies/P..._1992_2008.asp

Arkansas, Colorado, Maine, Mississippi, Nebraska, and West Virginia are the "new states" that started having Amish settlement in the period. Colorado got notice because it's furthest West. The states with the highest growth in Amish, in the period were the following in order of growth.

Virginia - Biggest increase, up 400%.
Kentucky
Minnesota
New York
Montana
Kansas
Illinois
Missouri
Wisconsin
Tennessee - More than doubled.

Last edited by Thomas R.; 06-29-2009 at 03:47 PM.. Reason: fixing it.
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Old 06-29-2009, 06:02 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
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http://www.nmmastergardeners.org/Pdf...ES/weather.pdf

What is the growing season in the Denver, Colorado, area? - eXtension

As you can see, the average growing season for Albuquerque is longer than Denver's. In fact a "short" season in ABQ is "normal" for Denver. The mountains have a shorter growing season than Denver. I'm not sure where in CO one can buy a piece of land to grow enough food for a family of 9. Metro Denver is pretty built up. The eastern plains are an option, I guess, if you can find the land to buy. The growing season is probably similar to Denver's. Farming is much different in CO than it is in the states listed above. Many groups of people have died thinking they could live off the land here, throughout history. I'm not saying it couldn't be done, just that it would be very different than what they are used to, what their culture is now.

You are growing enough for 4 people for 1/2 year. Do you mean all your vegetables, or what? I find it hard to believe you can grow your entire food supply for a family of 4 for 1/2 yr. on 1/16th of an acre.

Also, I don't understand your snide comment about my assuming they are stupid "or something".
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