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Old 06-28-2009, 10:35 AM
 
Location: southern california
55,668 posts, read 74,637,859 times
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bek once you start running you tend to keep on running.
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Old 06-28-2009, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Chariton, Iowa
681 posts, read 2,772,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drshang View Post
Many of you are committing one basic economic fallacy...

Low unemployment does NOT mean there are lots of jobs...it means fewer people are losing their jobs.

Cities like Iowa City, IA, State College, PA, Madison, WI and other areas with university, government or healthcare dominated economies always have low unemployment. Simply put, all of the major employers are institutions that don't lay people off. That doesn't mean they are hiring and that doesn't mean it's easy to find a job.

I know Penn State University has a hiring freeze. But State College, PA unemployment is still crazy low. I don't know about the University of Iowa but I'd take a gander it's probably pretty similar. It is deathly hard to find a job in a college town where the major employer is only doing a little hiring or none at all, especially if everyone you are competing with are recent graduates from said university or other people who have university connections.

The question at hand is not invalid, but do not correlate low unemployment with job growth, job opportunities or ease of finding a job.
Nailed it.
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Old 06-28-2009, 07:46 PM
 
1,426 posts, read 2,593,654 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SharpHawkeye View Post
Nailed it.
Sorry, low unemployment frequently CAN and often DOES mean there's a number of jobs available. To dismiss it as nothing other than fewer losing jobs is simply incorrect. Take a look at the list once again and notice the large number without major universities in the vicinity.
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Old 06-28-2009, 07:50 PM
 
1,426 posts, read 2,593,654 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
A city like Amarillo really is "in the middle of nowhere" in a literal and figurative sense.
Same with Oklahoma City or Tulsa or .....?
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Old 06-28-2009, 10:37 PM
 
Location: IN
20,852 posts, read 35,964,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by actinic View Post
Same with Oklahoma City or Tulsa or .....?
Not at all. Oklahoma City and Tulsa are much less isolated and are positioned much more favorably in terms of closer Interstate highway access to other cities of greater size at a closer geographic proximity. OKC is on the I-35 NAFTA corridor and DFW to the south is also part of the corridor.

The closest big city to Amarillo, TX is Oklahoma City- which is a 4 hour one way drive. Denver is a 7 hour one way drive. Even the small city of Lubbock, TX is a 2 hour drive.
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Old 06-29-2009, 08:39 AM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,275,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater
A city like Amarillo really is "in the middle of nowhere" in a literal and figurative sense.
Does nowhere even have a middle?
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Old 06-29-2009, 11:21 AM
 
1,426 posts, read 2,593,654 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Not at all. Oklahoma City and Tulsa are much less isolated and are positioned much more favorably in terms of closer Interstate highway access to other cities of greater size at a closer geographic proximity.
Thus my point ... many cities on the low unemployment are not that remote and aren't in the middle of nowhere.
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Old 06-29-2009, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Seattle
1,366 posts, read 2,929,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by actinic View Post
Sorry, low unemployment frequently CAN and often DOES mean there's a number of jobs available. To dismiss it as nothing other than fewer losing jobs is simply incorrect. Take a look at the list once again and notice the large number without major universities in the vicinity.
It certainly can mean more jobs are available. But the definition of unemployment is people who had jobs are going on benefits because they lost their jobs. Tons of articles I've read online are pointing to places like Madison, WI as "best places in the US to find a job" and it's complete nonsense. Even cities like Pittsburgh, PA have very low unemployment rates, relatively speaking, but ask anyone who lives there if it's easy to find a job, because it's not (university and healthcare centered economy).

What is more important is "rate of change" in unemployment numbers - some cities will have a baseline unemployment number lower or higher than others. If you see significant deviation from that number then you're more likely to have an employment problem.

Many cities that have super high unemployment are concentrated in fields such as construction and agriculture and retail. If you aren't in those fields then the "high number" is less important. Cities that have grown a lot will be overrepresented in those fields and thus have a higher unemployment number...but again...it could be easier to find a job in those cities depending on your field if that particular city is higher in the area you actually need work in.

My point is simply that unemployment is a useless number in isolation to determine if you should move to a city to find a job. It's okay to use it as a filtering device for further investigation, but at the end if the day there needs to be job growth in the field(s) you have expertise in and a significant presence of jobs already existing in order to find a job in that particular industry. It doesn't matter if Ames, IA has 0% unemployment if you are an electrical engineer and there are no employers of electrical engineers in that metro.
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Old 06-29-2009, 03:11 PM
 
Location: IN
20,852 posts, read 35,964,992 times
Reputation: 13301
Quote:
Originally Posted by actinic View Post
Thus my point ... many cities on the low unemployment are not that remote and aren't in the middle of nowhere.
I am not disagreeing. I would say cities like Iowa City, Omaha, Tulsa, Springfield, and Oklahoma City are more desirable compared to an Amarillo, TX.
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