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Old 07-08-2009, 05:53 PM
 
6,046 posts, read 10,050,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missymomof3 View Post
I have seen people stick their feet out but usually it's someone on a long trip and they are simply stretching their legs. No big deal, not sure why it bothers the poster so bad.
I can't speak for the poster, but it is dangerous to stick your feet out the window. If you get into a crash and the airbags come out, goodbye legs.
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Old 07-08-2009, 11:25 PM
 
2,097 posts, read 5,871,113 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5Lakes View Post
These areas don't have much of an Italian population. Toledo is heavily Catholic, but mostly German and Polish.

Ohio's Italian population is primarily in Cleveland (more so on the eastern side of the region), Youngstown, and some smaller towns near the eastern border with PA.
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The westside actually has a great percentage of Italians then in the ACTUAL city limits. Pretty much are all 10% .. I was looking on city data and it appears most of the westside communities have about the same percentage of Italians as the east..
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Old 07-09-2009, 07:04 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,076 posts, read 5,450,297 times
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I must say, this is one of my all-time favorite threads.

Initially shocking to me:

-The beautiful, rolling hills that I found in western Iowa as the sun was rising on my cross-country road trip.

-The remoteness of the "Arizona Strip" (area north of the Grand Canyon in Arizona). And the fact that a lot of it was used for cattle grazing. The few residences that we did come across were almost eerie-looking. But nothing topped the creepiness of Colorado City, AZ. Wow.

-The Toroweap view of the Grand Canyon is the most incredible sight I've ever encountered. Super-difficult to get there, but it's worth it!! (see above)

-The absolute beauty of the great plains!! I loved the "flat" side of Colorado just as much as the mountains. Have similar feelings about the panhandle of Texas (between New Mexico and Amarillo.) Flat, green, beautiful. Especially after days of desert.

-The fact that you can see the lights of the entire city of Las Vegas anywhere on the elevated outskirts of the valley. Coming from a tree-filled state, that blew my mind.

-Speaking of Las Vegas - was shocked to find that the women there are NOT more attractive than those in western Michigan. Not what I expected.

-Lake Tahoe, CA is not a fun place to visit during May.

-I was shocked to see how much of the South is forested!! I expected something similar to home in the upper midwest... woods mixed with lots of open fields and barns. Nope! I'm sure that parts of the South are more open, but from what I've seen in Alabama, Georgia, and North Carolina... solid trees everywhere!! Made me a little claustrophobic.

-Philadelphia felt very cold... literally and figuratively.

-Beaches along the Great Lakes are actually a lot nicer than a lot of ocean beaches that I've been to, especially Daytona and Myrtle Beach.

-Was shocked at how green and tree-filled that East Texas was!

-And, in no particular order... how good the roads are outside of Michigan, how down-to-earth the people are in Chicago, how much I enjoyed visiting Baltimore, how ugly Florida can be, how beautiful western Maryland is, and... how much all of these things still manage to make me appreciate Home.
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Old 07-09-2009, 07:09 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,075 posts, read 35,035,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_data91 View Post
I can't speak for the poster, but it is dangerous to stick your feet out the window. If you get into a crash and the airbags come out, goodbye legs.
You must have seen that Quentin Tarantino movie Death Proof.
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Old 07-09-2009, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
1,954 posts, read 4,505,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
The westside actually has a great percentage of Italians then in the ACTUAL city limits. Pretty much are all 10% .. I was looking on city data and it appears most of the westside communities have about the same percentage of Italians as the east..
I don't doubt that this is true in regards to the Italian population within the city limits since the east side is overwhelmingly black. Most Italians on the east side will be heavily concentrated in Little Italy (perhaps the only overwhelmingly white area on the east side within city limits), with little found in other neighborhoods. Within city limits on the west side you will likely find them in just about any neighborhood, although not as concentrated as in Little Italy (the area north of Detroit near W. 69th might come close).

As far as the suburbs go, you will find that the highest percentages of Italians are on the east side in places like Lyndhurst, Mayfield, Highland Hts, Wickliffe, Mentor, and other areas in western Lake County. Most of these communities are 20% - 30% Italian on average. I'm not saying that the west side does not have any Italians, but looking on City Data at the west side burbs I saw that the higher concentrations where in the 10% - 15% range. Nothing as high as what I could find on the east side.
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Old 07-09-2009, 08:03 AM
 
4,247 posts, read 9,716,682 times
Reputation: 3788
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
When I went to the Philadelphia area a couple things surprised me * * * 3. All the row homes in the city and older suburbs - I think one architecture designed most of that city
Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Another thing that suprised me about Pennsylvania small towns is how many of the houses are built right next to the road --- there is only a small front lawn or sometimes none at all.

Sometimes there are reasons for this --- like in the northern part of Hawley the houses are squeezed in between the narrow road and a steep hillside. But I also seen plenty of towns where there is plenty of room for the houses to be pushed back but they aren't.

You see this in other states of course, but I noticed it seemed more common in Pennsylvania. I am actually curious because I cannot figure out why people would build their houses like that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallydude02 View Post
True, many of those towns are towns the coal companies built. Fayette and Greene counties in PA have an abundance of them.

But is kind of weird to be out in the middle of nowhere and then all of the sudden, a cluster of houses rather rundown and tightly packed together, dotting the hillsides. Alot of these places seem kind of eerie to me though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
In this small area in Schuylkill County, PA the front door of people's houses are literally less than two feet from a two lane road with a high speed limit and no sidewalks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by garmin239 View Post
I noticed that too about PA. That and how densly packed the houses were, even in very small towns.
Youse/Yinz are going to have to help me out in this thread. The locals don't know what I'm talking about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ki0eh View Post
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Old 07-09-2009, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
4,948 posts, read 7,879,201 times
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When I drove across the county on I-90 to Montana, I was amazed at how little population there is through much of South Dakota and Eastern Montana. For miles upon miles, you don't come across a town, a house, or even a gas station. Just "nothingness".

I was surprised at how Kentucky did not feel "southern", but rather "appalachian".

I am was shocked after growing up in Maryland, how much it had changed after not visiting for a decade. I grew up in the Maryland/Washington D.C. suburbs. Didn't recognize the place. It made me sad. I still like to visit D.C. for the museums, though.
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Old 07-09-2009, 08:27 AM
 
44 posts, read 100,789 times
Reputation: 52
I was suprised in Charlotte that there was really no "uptown" neighborhoods. None of it felt urban. I thought a city with a population that size would have urban neighborhoods, but it felt like one enormous suburb. Even flying out of it, you can get the feel of just how huge the sprawl is. Never ending housing plans and stripmalls as far as the eye can see. I think all of North Carolina is like that.
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Old 07-09-2009, 09:07 AM
 
1,121 posts, read 3,197,790 times
Reputation: 1129
Quote:
Originally Posted by missymomof3 View Post
I have seen people stick their feet out but usually it's someone on a long trip and they are simply stretching their legs. No big deal, not sure why it bothers the poster so bad.
I personally would rather see their feet than their A** like I've seen in CA.
LOL
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Old 07-09-2009, 09:22 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,075 posts, read 35,035,900 times
Reputation: 15246
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ihatemorons View Post
I was suprised in Charlotte that there was really no "uptown" neighborhoods. None of it felt urban. I thought a city with a population that size would have urban neighborhoods, but it felt like one enormous suburb. Even flying out of it, you can get the feel of just how huge the sprawl is. Never ending housing plans and stripmalls as far as the eye can see. I think all of North Carolina is like that.
The Uptown, Myers Park, and SouthPark neighborhoods of Charlotte do have that feel.
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