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Old 07-19-2009, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,411 posts, read 26,265,752 times
Reputation: 16497

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How slow-paced Denver was
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Old 07-20-2009, 06:02 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,828,779 times
Reputation: 11141
In Miami (Beach in particular)
  1. Seeing more umbrellas used on hot sunny days than on days when it's raining
  2. People saying good morning to you after Noon.
  3. Italian shoes being sold later than the grocery stores are open
  4. How many school age children are at dinner with their parents at 11PM on a school night
  5. How it's more of an urban neighborhood than it is a beach community.
  6. Postal carriers wearing Prada and D&G sunglasses
  7. Rolls Royces in a Walgreen's parking lot
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Old 07-21-2009, 12:36 PM
 
Location: The Bluegrass State
336 posts, read 648,976 times
Reputation: 201
I travel from Kentucky to South Carolina on a regular basis for work. Two things stand out.

1) In South Carolina, I encounter a fair number of people from areas other than the South at the same conference I am attending, they always seem surprised by Banana pudding.

2)South Carolina seems to have really not given up on the civil war. I always get the feeling that it is only half time with them.
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Old 07-21-2009, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,964,144 times
Reputation: 2129
Quote:
Originally Posted by xxmagex View Post
1) In South Carolina, I encounter a fair number of people from areas other than the South at the same conference I am attending, they always seem surprised by Banana pudding.
LOL That's funny, what are they suprised about?
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Old 07-22-2009, 12:45 AM
 
812 posts, read 2,116,767 times
Reputation: 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
We've got the "What shocked you about the US" for foreigners list on here. Since America is so big it's like being in a different country from one area to another I thought I'd start a thread for Americans about what surprised you when traveling to another part of the US.

I'll start. I'm a lifelong Kentuckian. When I went to South Carolina and SE Georgia for the first time I was shocked at why there were no farms on all that flat land - in Kentucky all flat land is cleared of forest and farmed, only creek beds and hillsides are left to forest. I actually asked someone at a restaurant if something was wrong with the land around there

When I went to Pennsylvania I was shocked that there were no name brand gas stations - everything was named "Wa Wa" or something else equally stupid. How do people up there know they're getting good name brand gas from Shell or Chevron and not lower quality stuff from Speedway or BP?
shocking? nothing. surprised? yes, somewhat depending. i lived in florida, new jersey, alabama, wisconsin, a year in lousiville, kentucky then moved to north carolina then to colorado, then to arizona. i also did a stint in san antonio etc. i've resided or visited so many states it would take too long to list them and i've traveled cross america several times throughout my life. they are all more similar than different, except for the physical. anything really different? cali, las vegas, some outer territories or nyc as far as culture that could be considered anywhere close to the definition of drastically different. traveling from state to state, you notice how remarkably similar everyone is than not, so there is no way you can feel you are in another country because the marked difference in people not location determines the level of difference and shock factor.

i find it ironic and funny how the size and distance travel is needed in america is construed as having such a different culture everywhere yet the contradictory excuse is used that in europe you can bicycle to the next country but america is so vast blah blah blah. this is quite a dumb and illogical argument. this is only confirming the view and perception that america is not that diverse culturally region to region because you do have to travel pretty far or to a certain location to achieve the real SURPRISE or SHOCK factor and it's true. lmao.
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Old 07-22-2009, 08:42 AM
 
Location: hopefully NYC one day :D
411 posts, read 1,053,225 times
Reputation: 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by pw72 View Post
As I drove through Raleigh/Durham I was surprised at how little of the actual cities you see, mostly you see tree-lined freeways.
I felt the exact same way in suburban NJ west/southwest of NYC.
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
You rarely see those here. I can think of only 3 streets in the area with the center turn lane and none of them are actually in the city. We have neutral grounds so if you want to go left, you have to U-Turn. Even at lights you have to turn right and U-turn or keep straight U-turn then right to make a left.
That just sounds downright stupid, pointless, and too much of a hassle!!Why is it like that?!?!?!

Anyway, what has shocked me is:

New York City: How incredibly friendly the people are. Someone told us where to find a subway station and we didn't even ask!
Houston: How everyone on the freeways goes 80mph when the speed limit is 70mph
Southwestern Colorado: How cheerful everyone is. Almost too cheerful
England: How every town has a pedestrian street or a very walkable downtown lined with stores.
San Francisco suburbs: How the gold grass and completely clear skies made the area feel reaaaallly open. Also how Walnut Creek, CA had landscaping and flowers EVERYWHERE! It was beautiful!
Cleveland: How green and lush it was. Plus, I think it had rained a lot
Albuquerque, Santa Fe NM, and Durango, CO: the traffic for cities that size
Vancouver, Canada: How all the houses were really nice, how awesome it was that there were so many young people out and about in the evening on the main drag and how urban it was.
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Old 07-23-2009, 01:28 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington
2,317 posts, read 6,893,265 times
Reputation: 1701
Quote:
Originally Posted by leaana View Post
shocking? nothing. surprised? yes, somewhat depending. i lived in florida, new jersey, alabama, wisconsin, a year in lousiville, kentucky then moved to north carolina then to colorado, then to arizona. i also did a stint in san antonio etc. i've resided or visited so many states it would take too long to list them and i've traveled cross america several times throughout my life. they are all more similar than different, except for the physical. anything really different? cali, las vegas, some outer territories or nyc as far as culture that could be considered anywhere close to the definition of drastically different. traveling from state to state, you notice how remarkably similar everyone is than not, so there is no way you can feel you are in another country because the marked difference in people not location determines the level of difference and shock factor.
Which is exactly why it feels like a different country. At the most basic level, people are people everywhere. And yes, parts of the U.S. are going to have much more in common with each other than with other countries (maybe with a near-exception to the PNW and Western Canada). But still, people's attitudes and views on things and the way they go about things can be shockingly different from region to region, so much so that it IS like going to another country for some people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by leaana View Post
i find it ironic and funny how the size and distance travel is needed in america is construed as having such a different culture everywhere yet the contradictory excuse is used that in europe you can bicycle to the next country but america is so vast blah blah blah. this is quite a dumb and illogical argument. this is only confirming the view and perception that america is not that diverse culturally region to region because you do have to travel pretty far or to a certain location to achieve the real SURPRISE or SHOCK factor and it's true. lmao.
I don't think anyone was using this as an excuse? Could be wrong, but still it would make sense that, in Europe, the individual countries are so different because they've had a thousand years to shape and mold their cultures and they haven't been as historically mobile as modern day Americans or any contemporary humans really. So of course you could cycle to the next country in Europe and be shocked and surprised, but have to drive for longer in the U.S. (parts of which have only had ~200 years or less to develop a culture and have had TONS of immigration) to find somewhere with a shockingly and surprisingly different culture.
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Old 07-23-2009, 03:35 AM
 
501 posts, read 681,103 times
Reputation: 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWereRabbit View Post
I couldn't count on my ten toes the number of times I have cruised the narrow streets of Boston with my legs hanging out the passenger window. It is a very comfortable position and not nearly as dangerous as your mom might have told you when you're 8 (hint: pull 'em in if you see something they're gunna hit). Seriously man, I love good ol' fashioned C-D southern bashing but you are really reaaaaaching for it on this one.
I'm from Texas and I have never seen it, only feet on the dashboard from the passenger side and plenty of elbows out the window. I thought the original poster was just kidding I guess not. The comments though are hilarious keep them coming!
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Old 07-28-2009, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
553 posts, read 440,029 times
Reputation: 988
Having grown up in Southern California, I was surprised by several things my first trip to New York and New England:

-despite their reputation, how friendly New Yorkers were

-New York City was much cleaner than I expected. I wasn't in the worst
parts, but I walked extensively around Manhattan and thought it was
very clean for a big city

-how in many ways New York City is very old fashioned. Very few if any
super markets, lots of mom and pop grocers, bakeries, produce stands,
etc.

-the fact that in the New England suburbs and country, almost no one
had a back yard fence. One yard just merged into the neighbors with
no boundary to mark it. Every house in Southern California is walled or
fenced in. How do people back there with small kids or dogs prevent
them from getting lost or wandering around the neighborhood? Also, not
much privacy. If you have a barbecue, you better invite your neighbors.

-the items on the menu in restaurants in New England. When a waitress
asked me if I wanted the peas or squash, I knew I wasn't in California.
I love squash, but have never seen it on the menu in any restaurant
here, except for Boston Market. I would go there sometimes just for the
squash.

-how green everything is. Nothing is green here unless you water it.
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Old 07-28-2009, 10:21 PM
 
3,277 posts, read 4,619,321 times
Reputation: 1913
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeutralZone View Post
Having grown up in Southern California, I was surprised by several things my first trip to New York and New England:

-despite their reputation, how friendly New Yorkers were

-New York City was much cleaner than I expected. I wasn't in the worst
parts, but I walked extensively around Manhattan and thought it was
very clean for a big city

-how in many ways New York City is very old fashioned. Very few if any
super markets, lots of mom and pop grocers, bakeries, produce stands,
etc.

-the fact that in the New England suburbs and country, almost no one
had a back yard fence. One yard just merged into the neighbors with
no boundary to mark it. Every house in Southern California is walled or
fenced in. How do people back there with small kids or dogs prevent
them from getting lost or wandering around the neighborhood? Also, not
much privacy. If you have a barbecue, you better invite your neighbors.

-the items on the menu in restaurants in New England. When a waitress
asked me if I wanted the peas or squash, I knew I wasn't in California.
I love squash, but have never seen it on the menu in any restaurant
here, except for Boston Market. I would go there sometimes just for the
squash.

-how green everything is. Nothing is green here unless you water it.
I hate the chain link fences around the front yard that you see in some of the sleazier areas of SoCal. I always wondered why you see so much more of that there.
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