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Old 07-05-2009, 03:14 PM
 
Location: NY
133 posts, read 458,162 times
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Yeah but I have nothing in common with people in Ireland, Holland, Scotland, etc. I think that is why most people with long roots here in America just consider ourselves as American. I know I certainly do.
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Old 07-05-2009, 09:46 PM
 
1,763 posts, read 5,387,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
But not so much in the South. Most people are of English or Scotch-Irish or Scottish or Irish (sometimes I wonder about this one) decent and many claim an Indian ancestry as well. There are some German decendents and French, Spanish and Italian in the South as well but by and large it is Anglo or Celtic
Yep, and that map confirms your point. It looks like the German migration dominates the northern half of the US, with only scattered migration to the south.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trotter67
I've read a few things about this...

The south is very Anglo/Celt, but when you look at English Ancestry in the states, i find it hard to believe that in 2000 census only 24 million Americans claimed English Ancestry???

Yet in 1980, 50 million claimed English Ancestry.

Since the war of the revolution almost 3.5 million English have settled in the states. adding to the vast majority of Americans who was already of English heritage.

Odd.
That is odd. Maybe some of those English immigranst discovered other roots? There was a period where a lot of German names were changed, to sound more English, around the WW's. Mueller to Miller, Gramm to Graham, etc.

In the 1990 census, the 2nd largest ethnic group after the Germans were the Irish. I believe the English were #3.
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Old 07-06-2009, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,968,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Rankin View Post
All those people got here in the 1690's...?

It looks like most Americans are of German descent, which I've heard before.
I am an American, Kentuckian and Southerner, nothing else. My ancestors came here too far back to identify with their heritage.
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Old 07-06-2009, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,968,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
The most recent immigrant I know of on my family tree came in the 1820s. Most of my ancestors came from Scotland during the Jacobite Rebellion in 1745, most coming ashore at Wilmington NC.
Mine came from Scotland too but started out in Maryland and came straight here to Kentucky, they were some of the first people in Nelson County and then all moved to Meade and stayed there. My grandma was raised in Louisville, her parents were not so when she and grandpa married, they stayed in Louisville. probably why I identify more with Kentucky then Louisville. There's some useless info for ya
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Old 07-06-2009, 08:45 AM
 
Location: New England & The Maritimes
2,116 posts, read 4,208,625 times
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I know plenty of people around here whose ancestors came on the Mayflower. In 1620. That would generally be defined as "English" not "American". Whether or not you "identify" with your ancestors, if you know where they came from you should put that in the census. Writing "American" is incredibly annoying to those of us who study genealogy. Genealogy is already uncertain enough. For example, I am Scottish but they had originally come from Ireland in the famine, and probably went to Ireland from Scotland in the 1600s anyways. And who knows whether they're Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Viking, Norman or whatever. My point being, before a certain point nobody knows what they are. BUT almost all Americans vaugely know what county their ancestors came from so does us a little favour and write SOMETHING useful.
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Old 07-06-2009, 07:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supernerdgirl View Post
I love how most of the southerners just define themselves as American. their ancestors had to come from SOMEWHERE.
Well, there is quite a mix of English, Scots, Ulsterman (aka Scotts Irish) and Catholic Irish there, I reckon the PC thing to say is "American" so as not to ignite the troubles ...
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Old 07-07-2009, 10:33 AM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,643,245 times
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Most of the areas that self-report, "American" heritage are the places that historically had the most Scotch-Irish immigration..Which started in the mid-1700-late 1700s and was the largest group of immigrants from the British Isle prior to the American Revolution. The Applachian and Piedmont regions were originally settled by Scotch-Irish and "Border English". Though how many people really identify with being Scotch-Irish?

How come the Mormon Belt of Utah and Southern Idaho is the only region outside New England that still reports the majority heritage as English? Didn't most of the Mormons originally come from the Mid-West in the middle of the 19th Century?(Prior to German and other immigrants arrived in the area perhaps?)

Cultural self-perception is an interesting subject. If you asked my dad's family what our ethnic background was you'd probably get a reply of either English, German, Irish, or American, depending on who you asked--we've probbly go a lot of Scotch-Irish too. However, my mother is 100 percent Polish Catholic ...how often is that outside the Midwest these days?
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Old 07-07-2009, 05:38 PM
 
Location: central North Carolina
62 posts, read 150,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWereRabbit View Post
I know plenty of people around here whose ancestors came on the Mayflower. In 1620. That would generally be defined as "English" not "American". Whether or not you "identify" with your ancestors, if you know where they came from you should put that in the census. Writing "American" is incredibly annoying to those of us who study genealogy. Genealogy is already uncertain enough. For example, I am Scottish but they had originally come from Ireland in the famine, and probably went to Ireland from Scotland in the 1600s anyways. And who knows whether they're Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Viking, Norman or whatever. My point being, before a certain point nobody knows what they are. BUT almost all Americans vaugely know what county their ancestors came from so does us a little favour and write SOMETHING useful.
Writing "American" may be annoying to some of you, but it is the most ACCURATE answer for us white southerners. As others have pointed out, most white southerners are a MIX of English, Scottish, Scots-Irish and German ancestry. And probably a drop of Native American Indian too. So just putting down "English" or "Scottish" or whatever is really not complete or accurate...
Plus many of us have roots here since before the Revolutionary War; our ancestors have been here for so long that we have no connection or ties to their native homelands. In general, the whites in the South have been here far longer than the whites in the rest of the country. So we consider ourselves of "American" ethnicity.
Now, there are exceptions like parts of New England. But even most of New England has been "taken over" by the Irish and Italians since the early 1900's.
There are probably few true WASP (White Anglo-Saxon Protestant) New Englanders anymore. Those WASPs were the first permanent English settlers there.

Just a side note: It's interesting that the Outer Banks of North Carolina - my state - is still majority English ancestry. Those natives have been there since the 1600's and still identify with their English heritage, probably because it is so isolated from the rest of the state.

Very interesting stuff.

p.s. go to the website Houseofnames - Surname and Coat of Arms Search
...to find out info on the surnames in your family.
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Old 07-07-2009, 07:11 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,697,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Most of the areas that self-report, "American" heritage are the places that historically had the most Scotch-Irish immigration..Which started in the mid-1700-late 1700s and was the largest group of immigrants from the British Isle prior to the American Revolution. The Applachian and Piedmont regions were originally settled by Scotch-Irish and "Border English". Though how many people really identify with being Scotch-Irish?

How come the Mormon Belt of Utah and Southern Idaho is the only region outside New England that still reports the majority heritage as English? Didn't most of the Mormons originally come from the Mid-West in the middle of the 19th Century?(Prior to German and other immigrants arrived in the area perhaps?)

Cultural self-perception is an interesting subject. If you asked my dad's family what our ethnic background was you'd probably get a reply of either English, German, Irish, or American, depending on who you asked--we've probbly go a lot of Scotch-Irish too. However, my mother is 100 percent Polish Catholic ...how often is that outside the Midwest these days?
I think Idaho and Utah both have a lot of Scandinavian descendents from what I can see.
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Old 07-07-2009, 07:20 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,697,881 times
Reputation: 1869
Quite a mix in some areas of the South. I think it would be nice if we could just nail down "Polish" or "Russian" or "Italian" like you do up North. Since ancestries are a mystery to many of us down South, many just say American.

Irish in the South have always baffled me. While I have never said anything to anyone who says "I'm Irish" other than "oh", I think the Irish may be a little bit different down in the South. Nobody down here seems to have those well known names like O'Rourke or O'Malley which are dead giveaway Irish, nor are many Catholic. Unless they changed their name and church, its not quite the same kind of Irish as say in New York City or Boston. I know New Orleans has a large Irish community and Savannah too from what I understand.
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