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Old 07-06-2009, 08:44 PM
 
3,277 posts, read 4,620,450 times
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The problem is that America has too much space, so there is less commitment to increasing the quality of our existing areas and more towards increasing the quantity. At this rate your country will soon be a nation of ghost towns and boomburbs.
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Old 07-06-2009, 08:47 PM
 
3,628 posts, read 9,220,107 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeyserSoze View Post
I'm in agreement. But entertaining the thought that people are afraid of living in cities because of "unfounded fears"(stereotypes, like high-crime and living amongst minorities and people of a lower socio-economical background) is a bit silly. I know there are those types that exist, but still. The nationwide trend shows that people are filling out the metro, not the actual city itself. Which is kind of how it's been for a while, now. You can't honestly say that all these people across the country have "unfounded fears" of the city, can you?
No, not all of them, but there's still plenty of people who believe "city" equals "i'm gonna get robbed and stabbed if i go!"

It's quite hilarious actually.
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Old 07-06-2009, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Norwood, MN
1,828 posts, read 3,363,272 times
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Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
This basically shows how much the middle class is being pushed out of the wealthiest cities/suburbs in the country. Big difference between 1980 and 2009 as far as the middle class (who even knows if there will be one in 10 years). Middle class is moving out west and south so they can afford a better quality of life.
But what jobs are available in the west and south?
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Old 07-06-2009, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Norwood, MN
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Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
True, but the Census actually includes three Iowa counties as part of the Omaha, NE metro. I really think that only Pottawatomie County should be included.
Is Pottawommie the county in which Council Bluffs is located?
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Old 07-06-2009, 08:54 PM
 
3,277 posts, read 4,620,450 times
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Originally Posted by supernerdgirl View Post
No, not all of them, but there's still plenty of people who believe "city" equals "i'm gonna get robbed and stabbed if i go!"

It's quite hilarious actually.
I advanced a similar concept in the "Great places to raise a family" thread. It's really more about shielding one's self from the reality that the world is complicated and difficult to navigate more than anything.
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Old 07-06-2009, 09:00 PM
 
157 posts, read 342,831 times
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Originally Posted by supernerdgirl View Post
Or it shows that people are moving further away from the city out of unfounded fears and still commuting their from their safer suburban home.
I was referring to entire metro areas, not just suburban counties. Though, of course, suburban growth will be much greater in cities that are creating jobs as opposed to hemorrhaging them.
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Old 07-06-2009, 09:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by supernerdgirl View Post
Sorry, I just don't understand what's so appealing about living 20+ miles away from your job.
And, as I said before, I don't see what's so appealing about living on the 15th floor, paying $2,000/month for what is effectively a box, and having to routinely deal with the stress and commotion of dense urban environments. And density DOES equal stress, no question about it.
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Old 07-06-2009, 09:11 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Hoarfrost View Post
It's really more about shielding one's self from the reality that the world is complicated and difficult to navigate more than anything.
Care to provide any evidence for that claim? Because I believe that "shielding one's self from reality" is hardly a reason for decentralization. Some work in the 'burbs. Some work from home -- in the 'burbs. Some travel across the country, because it's a requirement for their job. Not everyone in the suburbs & exurbs wake up and shuffle out into the city like mindless drones. And neither are they trying to escape some "reality" to live in some delusion of grandeur. Some rarely venture into the city. Some just don't care about the city. Bottom line is that the city is no longer the centralized center of activity in a metro area. Cities themselves are becoming the core in which locally influences our everyday life, and not as a place to live anymore.
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Old 07-06-2009, 09:22 PM
 
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Originally Posted by loillon892 View Post
And, as I said before, I don't see what's so appealing about living on the 15th floor, paying $2,000/month for what is effectively a box, and having to routinely deal with the stress and commotion of dense urban environments. And density DOES equal stress, no question about it.
Urban environments do not necessarily have to equal stress. Cities like Vancouver and Geneva are highly dense yet enjoy the highest quality of living you'll find.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KeyserSoze View Post
Care to provide any evidence for that claim? Because I believe that "shielding one's self from reality" is hardly a reason for decentralization. Some work in the 'burbs. Some work from home -- in the 'burbs. Some travel across the country, because it's a requirement for their job. Not everyone in the suburbs & exurbs wake up and shuffle out into the city like mindless drones. And neither are they trying to escape some "reality" to live in some delusion of grandeur. Some rarely venture into the city. Some just don't care about the city. Bottom line is that the city is no longer the centralized center of activity in a metro area. Cities themselves are becoming the core in which locally influences our everyday life, and not as a place to live anymore.
What evidence do you need? When Midwest cities were built up, everyone in the nation was moving there. Then when it all went to Hell, everyone abandoned the Midwest for the Sun belt. Now people are beginning to leave the Sunbelt for the West. America has a long history of people simply throwing up their hands and abandoning huge population centers for newer population centers. It's precisely why they don't have nice cities like other developed nations do, because they don't commit to building nice cities. America as a nation has no sense of discipline or quality and in many cases makes it's problems worse than they would be by ignoring quality control.
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Old 07-06-2009, 09:37 PM
 
542 posts, read 1,290,206 times
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Originally Posted by Hoarfrost View Post
What evidence do you need?
How about the kind of evidence that would support your opinion? Saying that Americans are fat and lazy, or that "everyone else in the world is doing it" are not valid. People can make generalizations as to why they don't like the country or the suburbs, without ever giving a legitimate answer, like "it's just not for me" or "i don't care much for it". That's accepted. People who don't like urban areas can sling mud right back, while also giving legitimate reasons why they don't, like "it's not my cup of tea". But that's not accepted. And then urban lovers try to relegate others preferences by saying that something is "wrong" with those who don't want to live in the same environment as they do? That they're "scared" or trying to "escape"?

Last edited by KeyserSoze; 07-06-2009 at 10:06 PM..
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