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Old 07-06-2009, 10:05 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,346,516 times
Reputation: 2698

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoarfrost View Post
What evidence do you need? When Midwest cities were built up, everyone in the nation was moving there. Then when it all went to Hell, everyone abandoned the Midwest for the Sun belt. Now people are beginning to leave the Sunbelt for the West.
Correction: Californians are leaving California for the interior West. People aren't pulling up stakes in Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Charlotte, etc. en masse for Boise and Provo.

Quote:
America has a long history of people simply throwing up their hands and abandoning huge population centers for newer population centers. It's precisely why they don't have nice cities like other developed nations do, because they don't commit to building nice cities. America as a nation has no sense of discipline or quality and in many cases makes it's problems worse than they would be by ignoring quality control.
I also don't know of any other country that has risen to prominence as quickly as we did and has such a complex history relating to factors that fuel immigration and mobility as we do either.
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Old 07-06-2009, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,340 posts, read 8,711,868 times
Reputation: 1215
Quote:
Originally Posted by big daryle View Post
Is Pottawommie the county in which Council Bluffs is located?
Yep.
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Old 07-06-2009, 11:23 PM
 
Location: IN
20,864 posts, read 36,004,584 times
Reputation: 13310
Quote:
Originally Posted by big daryle View Post
Is Pottawommie the county in which Council Bluffs is located?
"Is Pottawaommie the county in which Council Bluffs is located?"
Yes.

The Census Bureau also includes Mills County, IA (15,113 people +3% gain since 2000), and Harrison County, IA (15,222 people -2.8% decline since 2000). Both of these counties are included in the Omaha CSA even though commuting patterns and overall development are pretty low.

The EXACT same analogy could be used for Linn County, KS (9,616 people +0.5% gain since 2000), Caldwell County, MO (9,248 people +3.1% gain since 2000), and Lafayette County, MO (32,913 people -0.1% decline since 2000).
These three counties are included in the Kansas City CSA even though commuting patterns and overall development are on the low end of the range.

It makes me wonder if the Census Bureau purposely adds these mostly exurban/rural counties into the CSA in anticipation of future growth and sprawl. I wonder what the qualifications are for a particular county within the CSA to be added in the first place
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Old 07-06-2009, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,340 posts, read 8,711,868 times
Reputation: 1215
Actually its MSA and I think the qualifications for it are that at least 25% of the population of a county commutes to the main city for work, and that its adjacent to a county already in the metro.
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Old 07-07-2009, 04:44 AM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
1,928 posts, read 4,636,275 times
Reputation: 1274
Quote:
Originally Posted by supernerdgirl View Post
Sorry, I just don't understand what's so appealing about living 20+ miles away from your job.
I live 50 miles from my job. I'm not crazy about it and would like to be closer, but other circumstances factor in also.
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Old 07-07-2009, 06:41 AM
 
3,628 posts, read 9,219,330 times
Reputation: 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighPlainsDrifter73 View Post
I live 50 miles from my job. I'm not crazy about it and would like to be closer, but other circumstances factor in also.
I used to live 35 miles from my job. Never again. and that was in the Nashville metro, I couldn't imagine trying it in the Chicago metro.
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Old 07-07-2009, 10:25 AM
 
Location: IN
20,864 posts, read 36,004,584 times
Reputation: 13310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Go Ne View Post
Actually its MSA and I think the qualifications for it are that at least 25% of the population of a county commutes to the main city for work, and that its adjacent to a county already in the metro.
I've been trying to understand the difference between MSA and CSA, but am still confused.
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Old 07-07-2009, 11:24 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,831,684 times
Reputation: 11141
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I've been trying to understand the difference between MSA and CSA, but am still confused.
I too have problems with the difference. Since the last Census, several MSA's were split into two and then "re-joined" as part of a CSA.
Supposedly, in some cases, CSA's combine former MSA's that have "distinct" central cities.
I'll use the two metros where I live to further describe how I understand it to be....
Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill (The Triangle) used to be one Metro. Raleigh and Durham share a city border and their respective counties share the area's major employment center: Research Triangle Park. In fact, a small part of Raleigh extends into Durham County and a small part of Durham extends into Wake County. Yet, several years ago, the Census Bureau split it in two statistically. They created the Raleigh/Cary Metro and the Durham Metro. But, they did combine them into a CSA that almost mirrors the former MSA. The explanation for the split was that the area had two center cities: Raleigh (392,000) and Durham (223,000).
Now, that would all make sense to me if I didn't have such a visible juxtaposition with South Florida....
In South Florida, there is one MSA and no CSA. The MSA incorporates Miami/Dade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties. The Miami/Ft. Lauderdale/Pompano Beach MSA has 3 distinct central cities in their respective counties: Miami, Ft. Lauderdale and West Palm Beach. But, instead of separating the metro into 3 distinct areas and later reconnecting them into a CSA, the Census Bureau created this term called "Metropolitan Division" for each of the 3 counties/cluster of cities within the MSA. In fact, the Census Bureau eliminated the West Palm Beach MSA and combined it with the greater South Florida area. A slap in the face came to them when West Palm Beach was even left off of the official name of the MSA. I'll never understand the Census Bureau.

I think that the Census Bureau should choose one method or the other but not use both. It's confusing and it heightens visibility of some places while reducing it for others. Personally, I like the MSA/Metropolitan Division methodology. People in the South Florida know that they are connected to each other in the same way that people in the Research Triangle are. To use these two different methodologies to express populations statistically is confusing.
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Old 07-07-2009, 12:04 PM
 
Location: IN
20,864 posts, read 36,004,584 times
Reputation: 13310
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
I too have problems with the difference. Since the last Census, several MSA's were split into two and then "re-joined" as part of a CSA.
Supposedly, in some cases, CSA's combine former MSA's that have "distinct" central cities.
I'll use the two metros where I live to further describe how I understand it to be....
Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill (The Triangle) used to be one Metro. Raleigh and Durham share a city border and their respective counties share the area's major employment center: Research Triangle Park. In fact, a small part of Raleigh extends into Durham County and a small part of Durham extends into Wake County. Yet, several years ago, the Census Bureau split it in two statistically. They created the Raleigh/Cary Metro and the Durham Metro. But, they did combine them into a CSA that almost mirrors the former MSA. The explanation for the split was that the area had two center cities: Raleigh (392,000) and Durham (223,000).
Now, that would all make sense to me if I didn't have such a visible juxtaposition with South Florida....
In South Florida, there is one MSA and no CSA. The MSA incorporates Miami/Dade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties. The Miami/Ft. Lauderdale/Pompano Beach MSA has 3 distinct central cities in their respective counties: Miami, Ft. Lauderdale and West Palm Beach. But, instead of separating the metro into 3 distinct areas and later reconnecting them into a CSA, the Census Bureau created this term called "Metropolitan Division" for each of the 3 counties/cluster of cities within the MSA. In fact, the Census Bureau eliminated the West Palm Beach MSA and combined it with the greater South Florida area. A slap in the face came to them when West Palm Beach was even left off of the official name of the MSA. I'll never understand the Census Bureau.

I think that the Census Bureau should choose one method or the other but not use both. It's confusing and it heightens visibility of some places while reducing it for others. Personally, I like the MSA/Metropolitan Division methodology. People in the South Florida know that they are connected to each other in the same way that people in the Research Triangle are. To use these two different methodologies to express populations statistically is confusing.
Thank you very much for that explanation.
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Old 07-07-2009, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Center City Philadelphia
1,099 posts, read 4,143,950 times
Reputation: 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by loillon892 View Post
And, as I said before, I don't see what's so appealing about living on the 15th floor, paying $2,000/month for what is effectively a box, and having to routinely deal with the stress and commotion of dense urban environments. And density DOES equal stress, no question about it.
Is that your idea of what a city has to be? You could get a 3 bedroom house in a nice neighborhood for $800 a month here where you can walk to work, shopping and parks without ever needing your car.

I think the suburbs are stressful. I don't want to have to drive and waste gas to get everywhere! It's frustrating for me.
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