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Old 07-07-2009, 01:38 PM
 
2,506 posts, read 7,756,341 times
Reputation: 828

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Quote:
Originally Posted by loillon892 View Post
And, as I said before, I don't see what's so appealing about living on the 15th floor, paying $2,000/month for what is effectively a box, and having to routinely deal with the stress and commotion of dense urban environments. And density DOES equal stress, no question about it.
1. Most New Yorkers don't even live on the 15th floor. Minneapolis has almost 400,000 people. I can think of maybe a dozen places in the City where you could live that high. 400,000 people can't live in 12 buildings. The secreat about tall buildings is that, while alot of people work in them, few people actually live in them.
2. In most cities (except New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Boston, Washington) $2,000 will get you a very nice box.
3. I have a question about it. I have been paying $750 for my box for quite some time now. (Most houses anywhere are, effectively, square structures with a roofline and some windows. Kudos to Osama bin Laden, The Smurfs and The Little Old Lady who Lived in a Shoe for bucking the trend.) I am one of the least stressed people that I know. Could it possibly be that stress comes from internal factors instead of external ones? I am seldom stressed because I give myself ample time to accomplish the things that I need to do. It would be the same if I lived in Manhattan, New York or Manhattan, Kansas.
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Old 07-07-2009, 02:06 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,132,535 times
Reputation: 10910
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
I am reading and re-reading your post and can't quite understand why you quoted my post with your response. Did you quote me because you agree? Did you quote me to disagree? Was there another reason?
BTW, I understand the dynamics of the greater Bay Area. I grew up there and, I currently work remotely for a company from there.
I was challenging your hemmed in by water statement regarding the Bay Area. The only impact of that has been minimal, in The City proper. Otherwise, sprawl is the real deal.
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Old 07-08-2009, 05:06 AM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
1,928 posts, read 4,631,028 times
Reputation: 1274
Quote:
Originally Posted by supernerdgirl View Post
I used to live 35 miles from my job. Never again. and that was in the Nashville metro, I couldn't imagine trying it in the Chicago metro.
Actually, it's not as bad as it sounds. I get to work between 4 and 5 in the morning so I leave my house at 3:30am. I leave work usually at 2pm or earlier. My employer lets me shift my work hours to accomodate the long commute and I work 1 day per week from home. Ideal no, tolerable for now, yes.

Lots of people in the office here live between 20 and 30 miles from work and their commute takes longer than mine but for various personal reasons can't shift their work hours.
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Old 07-08-2009, 07:45 AM
 
3,628 posts, read 9,211,161 times
Reputation: 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighPlainsDrifter73 View Post
Actually, it's not as bad as it sounds. I get to work between 4 and 5 in the morning so I leave my house at 3:30am. I leave work usually at 2pm or earlier. My employer lets me shift my work hours to accomodate the long commute and I work 1 day per week from home. Ideal no, tolerable for now, yes.

Lots of people in the office here live between 20 and 30 miles from work and their commute takes longer than mine but for various personal reasons can't shift their work hours.
I'm glad you guys can handle it because I can't! I'll never do it again.
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Old 07-08-2009, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,284,915 times
Reputation: 3827
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighPlainsDrifter73 View Post
Actually, it's not as bad as it sounds. I get to work between 4 and 5 in the morning so I leave my house at 3:30am. I leave work usually at 2pm or earlier. My employer lets me shift my work hours to accomodate the long commute and I work 1 day per week from home. Ideal no, tolerable for now, yes.

Lots of people in the office here live between 20 and 30 miles from work and their commute takes longer than mine but for various personal reasons can't shift their work hours.
Yikes! I couldn't handle getting up that early. I live about 35 miles from work and take the Metra (reverse commute) most days. Occasionally for various reasons I have to drive, and it usually is quite painful with evening traffic back into the city. I wouldn't be able to tolerate the commute if I had to drive every day.
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