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Old 11-26-2012, 07:07 AM
 
654 posts, read 1,297,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Miami's the true definition of semi-tropical.
No. Miami is true tropical. Fort Myers and Stuart, FL are the real definition of semi-tropical.
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Old 11-26-2012, 07:56 AM
 
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Miami can't handle bread-fruit or lipstick plants. I've always heard that's the indicator.
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Old 11-26-2012, 07:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canefandynasty View Post
No. Miami is true tropical. Fort Myers and Stuart, FL are the real definition of semi-tropical.
No, hun.
I live in south fla. . . . and the past couple nights have gotten into the 50s and highs into the 70s.

50 degree nights is not true tropical. Like, I dunno why you keep insisting that Miami is true tropical, it's not. True tropical doesn't get down into the 50s for nights on end........

Just accept Miami is sub-tropical. whats the big deal?
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Old 11-26-2012, 07:59 AM
 
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Miami is indeed sub-tropical. Having said that, we need a new term for the climate of the rest of the South. Because you can't grow half the plants that can be grown in South Florida, in other parts of the South. Why is this issue not being discussed in here?
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Old 11-26-2012, 09:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OptimusPrime69 View Post
No, hun.
I live in south fla. . . . and the past couple nights have gotten into the 50s and highs into the 70s.

50 degree nights is not true tropical. Like, I dunno why you keep insisting that Miami is true tropical, it's not. True tropical doesn't get down into the 50s for nights on end........

Just accept Miami is sub-tropical. whats the big deal?
Coastal Miami barely breaks below 45F, even in January. The site for Miami's official weather stats are too far inland anyways. Miami/Miami Beach have 11A PHZs, and the Keys have 11B PHZs...the only areas in South Florida with over 11 PHZ areas. So what if Miami is in the upper 50's for some consecutive nights recently. Miami's average lows typically for this month is 69F (1981-2010). It was 69F last year, and the year before. Just another knee jerk response.
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Old 11-26-2012, 09:55 AM
 
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It get's cooler more inland towards the glades. Coastal Miami is typically in a constant 65-75 degree range throughout winter. Miami does have cold snaps, but they don't last. But they do happen nonetheless.
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Old 11-26-2012, 10:00 AM
 
654 posts, read 1,297,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Miami is indeed sub-tropical. Having said that, we need a new term for the climate of the rest of the South. Because you can't grow half the plants that can be grown in South Florida, in other parts of the South. Why is this issue not being discussed in here?
Miami is not sub-tropical. That is pushing it. You said it yourself. Some plants grown in Miami can't be grown elsewhere in the South. So, are you grouping Miami's climate with the rest of the South? Just b/c it can't grow these ultratropical plants for long periods doesn't make it subtropical. So, is Havana, Cuba subtropical also since it also has a hard time growing breadfruit?....or northern Bahamas?
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Old 11-26-2012, 10:13 AM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,793,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canefandynasty View Post
Miami is not sub-tropical. That is pushing it. You said it yourself. Some plants grown in Miami can't be grown elsewhere in the South. So, are you grouping Miami's climate with the rest of the South? Just b/c it can't grow these ultratropical plants for long periods doesn't make it subtropical. So, is Havana, Cuba subtropical also since it also has a hard time growing breadfruit?....or northern Bahamas?
Good point.
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Old 11-26-2012, 11:56 AM
 
4,997 posts, read 7,331,478 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canefandynasty View Post
Coastal Miami barely breaks below 45F, even in January. The site for Miami's official weather stats are too far inland anyways. Miami/Miami Beach have 11A PHZs, and the Keys have 11B PHZs...the only areas in South Florida with over 11 PHZ areas. So what if Miami is in the upper 50's for some consecutive nights recently. Miami's average lows typically for this month is 69F (1981-2010). It was 69F last year, and the year before. Just another knee jerk response.
dude, u can throw all these zones at me but it doesn't mean anything. Miamiis north of the tropic of cancer. Not true tropical....... it's close, but not like San Juan, PR....or Kingston, JA.....or Hawaii.....those places are true tropical.
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Old 11-26-2012, 12:10 PM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 6,130,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Miami is indeed sub-tropical. Having said that, we need a new term for the climate of the rest of the South. Because you can't grow half the plants that can be grown in South Florida, in other parts of the South. Why is this issue not being discussed in here?
Subtropical applies to all of the South, except for the highest elevations. Check out the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map to get an idea of what can be grown where.
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