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Old 11-27-2012, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,141,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Miami just ain't tropical.
OK, fine. But I'm talking about a tropical climate.

Is Miami's climate a non-arid climate in which all twelve months have mean temperatures above 18 C (64 F).
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Old 11-28-2012, 07:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canefandynasty View Post
Miami is true tropical...not ultra tropical like Singapore, but can hold its own. The average temp for every month consistently gets over 64F, which makes it a true tropical climate.

IMO not all of South Florida is tropical however. In fact, only Miami city proper, Miami Beach, the Keys and immediate coastal southeast Florida is tropical. Anything from the coastal Miami to 10 miles inland is tropical. From coastal Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood it's like till 5-7 miles inland. WPB only like 2 miles. South of Miami, like Homestead and Kendall, is actually cooler until you get to the Keys.
True.
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Old 11-28-2012, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
5,302 posts, read 8,088,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canefandynasty View Post
Miami is true tropical...not ultra tropical like Singapore, but can hold its own. The average temp for every month consistently gets over 64F, which makes it a true tropical climate.

IMO not all of South Florida is tropical however. In fact, only Miami city proper, Miami Beach, the Keys and immediate coastal southeast Florida is tropical. Anything from the coastal Miami to 10 miles inland is tropical. From coastal Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood it's like till 5-7 miles inland. WPB only like 2 miles. South of Miami, like Homestead and Kendall, is actually cooler until you get to the Keys.
What about Southwest Florida? Naples, Venice, Fort Myers? You don't think those are tropical? They have the same climate as Miami, but I'll tell you, it ain't tropical, love.
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Old 11-28-2012, 08:20 PM
 
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Well, Miami SoFla is in the 10b-11 range of plant hardiness. The rest of the South is in the 8a range of plant hardiness.
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Old 11-28-2012, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
What about Southwest Florida? Naples, Venice, Fort Myers? You don't think those are tropical? They have the same climate as Miami, but I'll tell you, it ain't tropical, love.
They have a tropical climate by the Koppen definition of tropical climate. Naples and Fort Myers are Tropical Savanna Climates, while Miami is Tropical Monsoon. Climates are a range. Naples and Miami are warm enough to scrape by the lower limit into tropical.
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Old 11-29-2012, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
They have a tropical climate by the Koppen definition of tropical climate. Naples and Fort Myers are Tropical Savanna Climates, while Miami is Tropical Monsoon. Climates are a range. Naples and Miami are warm enough to scrape by the lower limit into tropical.
No, I was just asking canefandynasty because (s)he only considers Miami-Dade and the Keys tropical, but not Broward up to Palm Beach, or Southwest FL. They have the same climate! But I still don't call it tropical. It's better classified as semi-tropical.
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Old 11-29-2012, 02:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
What about Southwest Florida? Naples, Venice, Fort Myers? You don't think those are tropical? They have the same climate as Miami, but I'll tell you, it ain't tropical, love.
Naples is more transitional than tropical. Naples average night time lows in the winter is noticeably cooler than in Miami...about 7-10F difference. They are not the same.
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Old 11-29-2012, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,141,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
No, I was just asking canefandynasty because (s)he only considers Miami-Dade and the Keys tropical, but not Broward up to Palm Beach, or Southwest FL. They have the same climate! But I still don't call it tropical. It's better classified as semi-tropical.
Semi-tropical doesn't actually exist under the current climate classifications. Depending on how we define it, I would be ok with it. Miami's climate fits the definition of "tropical," but because it's right at the lower band and because it isn't a part of the tropics, it does seem weird to include it with Puerto Rico. Calling it semi-tropical would make sense if you define that as the lower band of tropical temperatures (like Miami and Havana).
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Old 11-29-2012, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Florida
862 posts, read 1,214,989 times
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Hawaii, South California and Miami.
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Old 11-29-2012, 08:18 PM
 
654 posts, read 1,293,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
No, I was just asking canefandynasty because (s)he only considers Miami-Dade and the Keys tropical, but not Broward up to Palm Beach, or Southwest FL. They have the same climate! But I still don't call it tropical. It's better classified as semi-tropical.
I consider all of coastal southeast areas (with the Keys) tropical, but not southwest, or inland.
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