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Old 12-02-2012, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
Semi-tropical doesn't actually exist under the current climate classifications. Depending on how we define it, I would be ok with it. Miami's climate fits the definition of "tropical," but because it's right at the lower band and because it isn't a part of the tropics, it does seem weird to include it with Puerto Rico. Calling it semi-tropical would make sense if you define that as the lower band of tropical temperatures (like Miami and Havana).
I think of semi-tropical as the same of subtropical. Just like semi-arid is the same as sub-arid.
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Old 12-02-2012, 06:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
I think of semi-tropical as the same of subtropical. Just like semi-arid is the same as sub-arid.
So, would Miami and Houston be sharing the same climate?
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Old 12-02-2012, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
I think of semi-tropical as the same of subtropical. Just like semi-arid is the same as sub-arid.
Oh. Then it doesn't work since Miami isn't subtropical. I had hoped we found some agreement.
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Old 12-02-2012, 08:11 PM
 
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Miami is sub-tropical, Zone 10b-11a. So it's teaters somewhere between sub-tropical and tropical. It's warmer in the winter than NO, Houston, SA, Jacksonville, Pensacola, etc. And it grows more rare tropical plants than them.
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Old 12-02-2012, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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I'm going by Koppen. It's tropical monsoon. What are you using?
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Old 12-02-2012, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
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Hawaii

In the mainland, Southern California, Southern Texas, Florida, and there's probably plenty in Louisiana as well.
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Old 12-02-2012, 09:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
I think of semi-tropical as the same of subtropical. Just like semi-arid is the same as sub-arid.
Honolulu is semi-arid climate. It has low rainfall count, and they're cities like Aruba and Mossoro with warmer temps and higher rainfall counts that are considered BSh climates instead of Group A on Koppen.

Honolulu is not a tropical climate.
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Old 12-02-2012, 09:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Miami is sub-tropical, Zone 10b-11a. So it's teaters somewhere between sub-tropical and tropical. It's warmer in the winter than NO, Houston, SA, Jacksonville, Pensacola, etc. And it grows more rare tropical plants than them.
What climate is Honolulu?
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Old 12-02-2012, 09:49 PM
 
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Well, I have never been to Hawaii, but being from South Florida I would bet Miami beats out places like Honolulu in the palm tree department. Honolulu is all about beaches and mountains. Not the trees growing around. lol. Miami truely flaunts its tropical weather with the amount of palm trees the city throws up around the place.

Southern California at this point is losing the palm tree battle. In fact, I have heard the the city of Los Angeles is just letting their palm trees die off to replace them with more native flora. Perhaps San Diego is different though?

Certianly not Tampa (where I live). Don't get me wrong, there is no shortage of palm trees in our bayside city and palmettos and cabbage palms grow natively all throughout central florida. Our city though prefers to plant trees that are not palm. For instance, by far the tree with the most presence in Tampa is the Southern Live Oak (dressed in Spanish moss). Two more trees the city prefers for the city to plant is the Jacaranda. Even though this is a very tropical tree it thrives in Tampa's subtropical climate. The third tree the city spreads around is the Southern Magnolia. This tree is beloved by all who live withing a few hundred miles of the gulf of Mexico, mostly throughout the South.

The one city I see getting really underrepresented in this thread though is Orlando. Orlando very much identifies with palm trees. I would imagine it is tough to do because most of the palms they flaunt (royals and coconuts) die every few years when a bad cold from comes in. Orlando works day and night to make itself a city of palms. We should give them credit!
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Old 12-02-2012, 09:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
What about Southwest Florida? Naples, Venice, Fort Myers? You don't think those are tropical? They have the same climate as Miami, but I'll tell you, it ain't tropical, love.
I'm from Naples. The folige and temperature of the southwest Florida is very much in line with a tropical climate. I think it is silly for people to say South Florida isn't tropical because it is just a couple of miles north of some imaginary line. Weather is shaped by many factors and someone drawing a line randomly across the earth doesn't dictate climate.
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